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Family And Friends Gather As St. Luke Health Services Holds Memorial Service

<p>Pictured is (left to right) St. Luke Health Services resident Elizabeth Kimball; Reverend Robert Stephenson, St. Luke Director of Pastoral Care; and Jack Woods, E.M., lighting the “Candle of Life” at a Memorial Service held recently at St. Luke.</p>

Pictured is (left to right) St. Luke Health Services resident Elizabeth Kimball; Reverend Robert Stephenson, St. Luke Director of Pastoral Care; and Jack Woods, E.M., lighting the “Candle of Life” at a Memorial Service held recently at St. Luke.

Family, friends and residents of St. Luke Health Services gathered recently to take part in a bi-annual Memorial Service held in honor of recently deceased residents.

“We invite our residents, family members and staff to join us in remembrance of those who have gone before us, and those we had the pleasure of knowing,” said Social Services Director Mike DeCirce. “These residents and families put their trust in St. Luke and we feel it fitting to celebrate their lives and also share in their loss.”

A ceremonial “Candle of Life” is lit during the ceremony representing deceased residents. Words of remembrance from family members and staff, song and prayer were all part of the meaningful experience. Contributing to the ceremony was Kathy Ziegler as soloist and song leader.

The Manor to Hold Memorial Service

The Manor at Seneca Hill will host a memorial service on Sunday, November 22 for former residents who have passed away. The event will be held between 1 and 3 p.m., with a ceremony at 1:30 p.m.

Family and friends of those residents are welcome to attend the event, which will be held in the Manor’s adult day room, located on the second floor. Those attending the service are asked to park in the upper parking lot.

The Oswego Health care system includes the Oswego Hospital, The Manor at Seneca Hill, a skilled nursing facility; Springside at Seneca Hill, a retirement living community; as well as numerous services across Oswego County. For more information, call (315) 349-5500 or visit oswegohealth.org.

City Plans Memorial For Rosemary Nesbitt

OSWEGO, NY – At Monday night’s Common Council meeting, Mercedes Niess, director of the H. Lee White Marine Museum, thanked the aldermen for the recognition the city bestowed on the late Rosemary Nesbitt.

It’s been a tough week with Mrs. Nesbitt taking ill and passing away, Niess told the councilors.

<p>Mrs. Rosemary Nesbitt.</p>

Mrs. Rosemary Nesbitt.

The 84-year-old Distinguished Teaching professor at SUNY Oswego and city historian, passed away on Aug. 2. She was also the founder and immediate past director of the Marine Museum.

“I would like to thank the city for everything that you did for Rosemary Nesbitt,” Niess said, her voice cracking with emotion.

She helped the family with the arrangements.

They knew Mrs. Nesbitt was very involved in the community. “But I don’t think they really knew the extent of the love of this community had for her,” Niess added. “So, when we saw all the flags at half-staff and the police officers at every intersection, with their heads bowed, it was an amazing tribute to a wonderful person. So, thank you very much.”

She invited the council to a memorial celebration in honor of Mrs. Nesbitt’s life to be held this Friday in Breitbeck Park at 7 p.m.

There will be some speakers, but anyone will be able to share their remembrances about Mrs. Nesbitt, she noted.

In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the H. Lee White Marine Museum, West First Street Pier, Oswego; St. Mary’s Restoration Fund, 103 W. Seventh St., Oswego; or the United Way of Greater Oswego County, 1 S. First St., Fulton.

Memory Of Pulaski Parole Officer Killed In Accident Will Be Honored Today

<br />Jeffrey Woolson.

Jeffrey Woolson.

A fallen parole officer from Pulaski will be honored today in Albany.

Jeffrey Woolson’s name will be added to the state Parole Officers Memorial in Albany, in a morning ceremony at Empire State Plaza that will feature a gathering of parole and probation officers from around the state. Gov. David Paterson will speak at the ceremony.

Woolson died in March in a car accident that happened while he was on the job. He lost control of his car on Route 11 in West Monroe, ran off the road and hit a tree.

He was 41 years old.

“Officer Woolson performed his duties with dedication and honor. His death serves as a reminder of the dangers Parole Officers face every day in their work,” interim chairman of the New York State Division of Parole, Henry Lemons said at the time.

Woolson joined the state parole division in Septemberm 2006 after a time with the Oswego County Probation Department.

Below is what will be said about Woolson as his name is added to the Memorial:

“Jeffrey Woolson joined the Division’s Rochester office in 2006 as a parole officer after serving the Oswego County Probation Office for fourteen years.

While traveling to an assignment on County Route 11 in the Town of Monroe Officer Woolson lost control of his vehicle on the icy road. The vehicle left the road and struck a tree, fatally injuring him.

Officer Woolson was known as an ultimate professional. For parolees that wanted to steer their lives along a positive track, he was the parole officer you wanted. If you were a parolee who thought about absconding, Officer Woolson was not the person you wanted as your parole officer because he would make sure you returned to supervision quickly.

<br />The Parole Officers Memorial in Albany.

The Parole Officers Memorial in Albany.

The Manor To Hold Memorial Service

Submitted Article

OSWEGO, NY – The Manor at Seneca Hill will host a memorial service on Nov. 23 for former residents who have passed away.

The event will be held between 1 and 3 p.m., with a ceremony at 1:30 p.m.

Family and friends of those residents are welcome to attend the event, which will be held in the Manor’s adult day room, located on the second floor.

Those attending the service are asked to park in the upper parking lot.

The Oswego Health care system includes the Oswego Hospital, The Manor at Seneca Hill, a skilled nursing facility; Springside at Seneca Hill, a retirement living community; as well as numerous services across Oswego County.

For more information, call (315) 349-5500 or visit oswegohealth.org

Despite Funding To Oswego, Lee Continues Efforts Toward Partnership

FULTON, NY – An A. L. Lee Memorial Hospital official says that despite the state’s announcement that Oswego Hospital will receive a sizeable grant to make improvements to several of its departments, the goal of keeping Lee Memorial up and running has not changed.

This past week, New York State announced that Oswego Hospital was awarded $14.4 million in HEAL NY (Healthcare Efficiency and Affordability Law for New Yorkers) funding. The money was designated to help the hospital move its laboratory department, double the size of its radiology department and make sizeable renovations in its emergency department, among other improvements.

Richard Abbott, chairman of the Lee Memorial Hospital board of directors, said he was surprised when he learned of the grant but stressed that it does not change Lee Memorial‘s direction.

Three days before the June 30 deadline to eliminate its 67 in-patient beds, Lee Memorial learned that it was granted a one-year extension to meet criteria outlined by the Berger Commission and the State Health Department. The extension was granted to allow the Fulton hospital to pursue an affiliation with another hospital.

“Nothing has changed with respect to Lee Memorial and the Department of Health,”  Abbott said. “We are still in contact with St. Joseph’s and Crouse. We haven’t been rejected by either hospital.

“It doesn’t change our approach or strategy,” Abbott added. “We will still try to reach a partnership agreement to keep our services going. That’s what we intend to do.”

Abbott said Lee is waiting to hear back on a couple of discussion items that have exchanged with both Crouse and St. Joseph’s hospitals.

“We expect to get answers back on those discussion points without a week or so,” he said

While he declined to say what the discussion points are or with whom, Abbott said that Lee is next to initiate contact with one of the two hospitals. He said the other hospital “has the ball” on another conversation.

Regardless of Lee’s activities, Abbott said he was surprised to see Oswego receive a grant for so much money. Governor David A. Paterson announced that $280 million in grants were being awarded under HEAL NY to fund health care restructuring projects throughout New York State. The program authorizes the State to appropriate or bond up to $1 billion for projects that support the mandates of the Commission on Health Care Financing in the 21st Century (Berger Commission).

“The whole idea of Berger was to save money,” Abbott said. “Then the state comes out with this announcement that they are going to spend millions of dollars on Oswego alone.”

Abbott pointed out that Lee would be in line to receive money from the state if it made the transition to a diagnostic/outpatient treatment facility, as well.

“It is a little mind-boggling,” he said. “They created the Berger Commission under the pretense of trying to save money.”

Abbott noted that the majority of Lee Memorial’s options committee and hospital executive director Dennis Casey met with State Senator Darrel Aubertine this past week.

“We talked to the senator about our need for support from the state when we reach a partnership agreement,” Abbott said. “He has been very responsive to that all along. … He has assured us that as we move forward, he will do what he can to help us continue to operate.”

“The senator remains committed to working with Lee Memorial to keep its doors open, the health care services in tact and the jobs in place,” Aubertine spokesperson Drew Mangione confirmed. “The senator has made it a priority to  maintain contact with the hospital, its board members and its staff and to do whatever he can to help out.”

McDonald Cancer Memorial Nearing October Dedication

Submitted article

</p>Construction underway on the Joyce McDonald cancer memorial.  Photo courtesy www.joycemcdonaldcancermemorial.com

Construction underway on the Joyce McDonald cancer memorial. Photo courtesy www.joycemcdonaldcancermemorial.com

The Joyce McDonald Cancer Memorial (for all cancer victims in Oswego County) will hold a meeting at 6:30 P.M., on Monday September 22nd, in the Fellowship Hall of the Bristol Hill Church. The church is located on Route #3, one mile East of Volney Center. The public is invited.

We will be planning for the October 11th dedication of the cancer memorial, and any help you could give us will be greatly appreciated.

The cancer memorial is a 50 foot cement structure in the form of a cross, with granite plaques on top with the names of all cancer victims in Oswego County. If you know of anyone who has or is suffering from cancer or any other environmental related disease or sickness, and would like their name be placed on the cross, please call 593-1114, or get an application on the www.joycemcdonaldcancermemorial.com web site.

Aubertine Kicks Off ‘Working for Us’ Tour in Fulton

FULTON, NY – State Sen. Darrel J. Aubertine, D-Cape Vincent, joined the people of Fulton and employees of A.L. Lee Memorial Hospital to announce the theme of his re-election campaign: “Working for Us.”

“Throughout this district, I meet hard working people everywhere I go and like them I am committed to working hard for families right here in Fulton and throughout Central and Northern New York,” Sen. Aubertine said. “That’s what I’ve always done in elected office and that’s what I plan to do—work for people. I understand what it’s like to worry about a job, health care and property taxes.”

State Sen. Darrel J. Aubertine met with county residents, doctors, nurses and other employees of A.L. Lee Memorial Hospital on Wednesday afternoon to express his commitment to saving the hospital and kick off his "Working for Us" tour. The crowd of about 75 people applauded the senator and stuck around afterward to thank him for his work.

State Sen. Darrel J. Aubertine met with county residents, doctors, nurses and other employees of A.L. Lee Memorial Hospital on Wednesday afternoon to express his commitment to saving the hospital and kick off his"Working for Us" tour. The crowd of about 75 people applauded the senator and stuck around afterward to thank him for his work.

A.L. Lee Memorial had been slated to close on June 30 to comply with the Berger Commission’s recommendation. Sen. Aubertine worked with the Department of Health and A.L. Lee officials to put off the closure for a year and give the hospital a framework under which it could remain open, preserving jobs and vital jobs for the Fulton area.

“During my last campaign, keeping Lee Memorial open was a key issue and as your senator I have made it a priority to protect the services and jobs here,” Sen. Aubertine said. “Today, I stand in front of this hospital and it’s still open. It took hard work to get to this point and I will continue to work with administration to protect healthcare in this region and the jobs that are so important to this city.”

From now through Election Day, the Aubertine Campaign will be traveling throughout the district to promote the work Sen. Aubertine has done in his first term and discuss jobs, taxes, healthcare and all of the issues that affect us.

“Over the next two months I will be visiting places like this, meeting with workers and talking to individuals and families whose lives are affected every day by these issues,” Sen. Aubertine said. “I look forward to these conversations and taking our issues to the senate.”

Teens Explore Medical Careers

FULTON, NY – For two days this week, A.L. Lee Memorial Hospital in Fulton opened its doors to give seven students hands-on experience in a variety of health care fields during the hospital’s seventh annual Medical Academy of Science and Health (M.A.S.H.) camp.

While several of the activities were similar to those from previous years, hospital spokesperson Betsy Copps said that several of the hospital staffers developed new activities for the group this year.

“Some of the staff wanted to freshen the program,” Copps said.

Amelia Yousey of Lacona takes a breathing test in the pulmonary lab.

Amelia Yousey of Lacona takes a breathing test in the pulmonary lab.

Citing examples, Copps said that the laboratory portion of the camp this year focused on how lab work could solve a mystery.

“It was kind of a twist on a CSI show, like a murder mystery,” Copps said. “The group started out in the morgue to hear the beginning of the story and there was crime scene tape; things like that. … The students were able to rule out suspects through blood type analysis using the blood typing technology. It was a lot of fun.”

In another new activity, Copps said the campers took part in a “virtual knee replacement” online.

Copps said some of the regular activities that have been favorites among the students were included, as well, such as wheel chair races, a mock “code blue” exercise, a visit to surgery and the chance to X-ray an action figure using the hospital’s digital X-ray technology.

“They were able to see what it is like to shock a person and intubate,” she said. “The students also did CPR hand compressions.”

Copps said that the students were given a chance to meet with the hospital’s volunteer coordinator and also received a book to detail all of the hospital’s different departments.

“There is no way that they could possibly experience everything in the two days,” she said. “They are given the book to show them the wide variety of careers available in health care.”

Copps noted that Lee Memorial was one of the first hospitals to conduct a M.A.S.H. camp.

“It really is great,” she said. “We’ve had a couple of M.A.S.H.-ers go on to explore health care opportunities. The group of New Vision students that just graduated had a former M.A.S.H. camper. As the years go by, it is nice to see that this may have made a difference.”

Copps said that the program gives the students a chance to explore the fields they are interested in, or even unaware of.

“They are able to see what they like and what they might not like at a young age,” she said.

Maria Rice of Sandy Creek is hooked up to a machine that is used to help people clear mucus from their lungs.

Maria Rice of Sandy Creek is hooked up to a machine that is used to help people clear mucus from their lungs.

Nikki King of Fulton, who is going into the eighth grade this fall, said she was impressed with her first experience at M.A.S.H. camp. Her favorite department during the two days, she said, was surgery.

“It was the thing that was most interesting to me,” King said. “It is something I am thinking about going into.”

King said that M.A.S.H. camp sounded interesting but taking part in the camp was better.

“I would recommend it,” she said.

Allison Sheets of New Haven agreed. Sheets will enter the ninth grade this fall at Mexico High School and said this was her second time taking part in M.A.S.H. camp.

“I did it last year at Oswego Hospital,” she said. “I really enjoyed it.”

Sheets said she is considering a career in pediatrics. While pediatrics are not part of the Fulton camp, she said she enjoyed taking part in the various activities.

“I saw a lot of new things this year,” Sheets said. “It was also different from hospital to hospital.”

Deanna Buley of Lacona, who is going into ninth grade in the Sandy Creek school district this fall, said that she is considering a career in veterinary medicine.

“I really want to start in the veterinary field but wanted to know more about what is available (in health care),” Buley said. “I really liked the (operating room) and the lab the most. The lab had experiments and tests. In the O.R., I saw what it was like to work in there.”

After two days at M.A.S.H. camp, Buley said she is still interested in becoming a veterinarian but may also be considering a second option.

“I am considering working in a lab,” she said. “I really enjoyed that.”

Buley said she would tell anyone considering M.A.S.H. camp to try it out.

Deanna Buley from Lacona practices lifting a gurney with an EMT from Menter ambulance during one of several “rotations” the students experienced at M.A.S.H. camp.

Deanna Buley from Lacona practices lifting a gurney with an EMT from Menter ambulance during one of several “rotations” the students experienced at M.A.S.H. camp.

“It is such a good way for you to learn hands-on about these professions instead of just reading about things in a text book,” Buley said.

Also new to the program this year was registered nurse Becki Bettinger, the patient and community educator at Lee Memorial who worked with the teens for the entire program.

“M.A.S.H. camp is a great experience,” Bettinger said. “We bring in eighth and ninth graders who get to learn about the different areas of health care. They see that it is so much more than nursing or medicine. There are so many things they can do.”

Bettinger noted that the staff who took part in the program went “above and beyond” to give the students an interesting experience. At the end of the program, she said that the students were asked to critique the program through evaluations.

“We will take that information and find out what they were happy with and how we can do things better next year,” Bettinger said. “I am looking forward to next year already. It was a lot of fun.”

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