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LOC Relocates Debut Of Board Game

OSWEGO, NY – The Leadership Oswego County Class of 2010 will soon unveil its History of Oswego County board game.

The very special event will take place May 5.

The event has had a change in location and will now be held at the American Foundry, 246 W. Seneca St.

Created as a tribute to Oswego City Historian Rosemary Nesbitt, the entertaining History of Oswego County board game also contains an informative fact sheet on Oswego County’s history.

The class is excited about the debut of the game and is hoping to raise enough money to produce games that they can distribute to area schools, libraries, and other organizations throughout Oswego County.

“We are looking forward to the game’s debut and hope that the community will have as much fun playing the game as we had in developing it,” said LOC class member Carolyn Handville. “It was Rosemary’s mission to research significant historical sites, the events that took place there, and the people that helped shape the history of Oswego County. She enjoyed passing that information on to others and keeping Oswego County’s history alive for generations to come. In her honor, the LOC class of 2010 wants to continue Rosemary’s mission and continue to inspire interest in the history of Oswego County.”

The LOC class invites community members to join them and celebrate the debut of the History of Oswego County game on May 5 from 6 to 9 p.m. at the American Foundry.

Those interested in being one of the first to play the History of Oswego County board game may do so by recruiting a team of 4 players and registering to reserve a spot for your team.

The fee for a team is $40.

“We invite you to come and make history with the Leadership Oswego County Class of 2010 and honor the memory of Rosemary Nesbitt,” added Handville.

To register, send a check payable to: LOC c/o Oswego College Foundation, 103 Rich Hall, Oswego, NY 13126.

For more information on the event, contact Dawn Holynski via e-mail at Dawn.Holynski@oswego.edu

Leadership Oswego County Class Makes ‘History’

OSWEGO, NY – Exciting news from Leadership Oswego County Class of 2010!

As a tribute to Oswego City Historian, Rosemary Nesbitt, the LOC class has created a board game and fact sheet on the history of Oswego County.

As a tribute to former Oswego City Historian, Rosemary Nesbitt, the Leadership Oswego County class of 2010, pictured, has developed a board game and fact sheet on the history of Oswego County. In front are: Dan Sokal, Danielle Hayden, Aaron Rowan and Valerie Walthert.  In the middle are: Karen Perwitz, Gregory Gazda, Richard Sherman, Kimberly Hyde, Michele Scardella, Mathew Seubert, Nancy DeGilormo, Mary Hoben, Tracy Doherty, and Brenda Ko. In back are: Susan Pope, Reyne Pierce, Maggie Killoran, Morgan Berry, Lisa Solazzo, Carolyn Handville, Katie Backus, Atom Avery, Tim Yager, Edward Garrow, Brian Cummings and Mary Maunder.

As a tribute to former Oswego City Historian, Rosemary Nesbitt, the Leadership Oswego County class of 2010, pictured, has developed a board game and fact sheet on the history of Oswego County. In front are: Dan Sokal, Danielle Hayden, Aaron Rowan and Valerie Walthert. In the middle are: Karen Perwitz, Gregory Gazda, Richard Sherman, Kimberly Hyde, Michele Scardella, Mathew Seubert, Nancy DeGilormo, Mary Hoben, Tracy Doherty, and Brenda Ko. In back are: Susan Pope, Reyne Pierce, Maggie Killoran, Morgan Berry, Lisa Solazzo, Carolyn Handville, Katie Backus, Atom Avery, Tim Yager, Edward Garrow, Brian Cummings and Mary Maunder.

It was Rosemary’s mission to research and inform people about all the significant historical sites, people and events that occurred in Oswego County.

To continue her legacy, LOC called upon county historians to assist in the development of the facts contained in the game.

To celebrate and debut the board game, a Game Night has been planned for May 5 from 6-9 p.m. at the Elks club.

The event is a fundraiser to help finance the production of enough games to distribute, free of charge to the schools, libraries, YMCAs, and other organizations throughout Oswego County.

If you would like to be one of the first to play the board game, recruit a team of four, register and reserve a spot for your team.

The fee for a team is $40.

Please come and make history with the Leadership Oswego County Class of 2010 in memory of Rosemary Nesbitt.

To register your team, send a check payable to: LOC c/o Oswego College Foundation, 103 Rich Hall, Oswego, NY 13126.

For more information, contact Dawn Holynski at Dawn.Holynski@oswego.edu

Great Pumpkins Abound In Port City

The third time was a charm for Alan Nesbitt. After posting a third place finish in 2007 and a second place last year, he captured the top spot at Oswego's Great Pumpkin Fest this year.

The third time was a charm for Alan Nesbitt. After posting a third place finish in 2007 and a second place last year, he captured the top spot at Oswego's Great Pumpkin Fest this year.

OSWEGO, NY – Three, two, one – winner!

After a third place finish in 2007 and runner up last year, Alan Nesbitt of Canisius (south of Rochester) won top honors Saturday at the 2009 Oswego Great Pumpkin Fest.

Casey Jansen of Geneva is visiting his grandparents in Scriba. On Saturday, he visited the Oswego Fire Department's open house and then ran into his new friend "Patches" at the Pumpkin Fest a short time later.

Casey Jansen of Geneva is visiting his grandparents in Scriba. On Saturday, he visited the Oswego Fire Department's open house and then ran into his new friend "Patches" at the Pumpkin Fest a short time later.

After a second place finish in 2007 (with a 1,149.5 pounder), Joe Pukos took home the top prize in 2008 with a 1,219.5 entry. Nesbitt was right on his heels with a 1,141-pound pumpkin.

This year, Nesbitt pulled away from the competition and won the crown with an entry that tipped the scales at 1,229.5 pounds.

Matt VerSchneider of Freeville (south of Cortland) took the top spot with a weight of 1,089 with one pumpkin left to go . . . Nesbitt’s.

He looked over at the hulk, glanced at the official weight of his entry and remarked, “There’s your winner. That’s 1,100, maybe 1,200 easily.”

The other three pumpkins to crack the 1,000-pound plateau at this year’s festival were Randy and Deb Sundstrom with 1,028 followed by Brian Staring with 1,048 and Tim Finn at 1,079.

Pumpkins were the theme of the weekend. This young man uses a pumpkin to pick up a spare at the pumpkin bowling booth.

Pumpkins were the theme of the weekend. This young man uses a pumpkin to pick up a spare at the pumpkin bowling booth.

Randy Sundstrom said he used the seeds from the pumpkin of another competitor who beat him a while back at the festival in Cooperstown (“by just 8.5 pounds!”).

“It takes a lot of patience, water and fertilizer to grow a big pumpkin,” he said. We get seeds from each other and see what works best for us.”

Finn said he only grew the one pumpkin this year.

“It took up about a third of my back yard,” he said.

“This is going to be the second place pumpkin. That one is going to be first. I’ll bet on it,” VerSchneider said pointing at Nesbitt’s pumpkin.

Nesbitt said he grew his winner from the seed of a 1,385-pound pumpkin.

“This pumpkin is just about 90 days old from the blossom,” he pointed out. “It took a lot of water, definitely a lot of fertilizer and a lot of crossing of the fingers; there is a lot of luck involved.”

The growing season was very cold and difficult and this was the only great pumpkin that he had this year.

As it turned out, he smiled, it was the only one he needed.

There were plenty of rides for children to enjoy at the 2008 Oswego Great Pumpkin Fest.

There were plenty of rides for children to enjoy at the 2008 Oswego Great Pumpkin Fest.

Christine DuRoss proved women can grow giant pumpkins just as well as men.

Her 914-pound entry placed 10th. It was a bit smaller than her 938.5 entry in 2008, which placed fourth.

“The weather was pretty tough,” she said. “You have to have just the right conditions, and a bit of luck helps, too.”

Nesbitt said he’s been doing this for 25 seasons (since he was 14) and a little bit of luck always helps out.

“We lucked out this year,” he said.

The 2008 pumpkin was his personal best. He lost one last season that weighed 1,426.

The weather plays a big part in pumpkin growing, agreed Hannibal resident Steve Westcott. He grows his organically, he added.

Sixteen-month-old Eli Prior wears a pumpkin beret to show his support of Oswego's Great Pumpkin Fest.

Sixteen-month-old Eli Prior wears a pumpkin beret to show his support of Oswego's Great Pumpkin Fest.

In 2007, Bill Bobier’s pumpkin weighed in at 1,405.5 pounds – the biggest the Oswego Great Pumpkin Fest has ever seen.

It blew past the 912.5-pounder that captured first place for Eric Gerry in 2006. And, it edged out Dave Schafer’s 1,081.5-pound entry from 2005.

Prior to 2007, the top weight was 1,100 (set seven years ago), also by Bobier.

The only thing bigger than the pumpkins was the crowd at the 2009 Oswego Great Pumpkin Fest. The warm weather brought out hundreds of people, young and old.

Aside from the pumpkin and other weigh-ins, this year’s pumpkin festival had dozens of craft and food vendors set up in East Park, including a wine and cheese tasting event, as well as a wide variety of goods, music and activities.

East Park was crowded all weekend with people enjoying good food and activities, and of course, great pumpkins.

East Park was crowded all weekend with people enjoying good food and activities, and of course, great pumpkins.

“This is a great event,” said Frank Clavelli Jr. “What a great way to fall into fall! There seems to be a much bigger crowd this year. There is so much to see and do. All the stuff they do is just great for the kids.”

The results for 2009 are in. The top ten pumpkins are:

1.    1229.5        Alan Nessbitt
2.    1089.0        Matt VerSchneider
3.    1079.5        Tim Finn, Webster, NY
4.    1048.5        Brian Staring, Waterville, NY
5.    1028.0        Deb & Randy Sundstrom, Walton, NY
6.     984.0        Tim & Christy Wolf, Little Valley, NY
7.    982.0        Steve Westcott, Oswego, NY
8.    962.0        Jeff Alberts, Memphis, NY
9.    946.5         Walt Merriam, Fayetteville, NY
10.    914.0        Christine DuRoss, Honeoye Falls, NY

Youngsters used other gourds to create festive faces on pumpkins.

Youngsters used other gourds to create festive faces on pumpkins.

Squash (3):

1.    637.0        Steve Westcott
2.    276.5        Rick Inzero, Webster, NY
3.    231.0        Cody Szatkowski, Macedon, NY

Watermelon (5):

1.    76.0        Linda Burgey, Rochester, NY
2.    75.5        Deb Sundstrom, Walton, NY
3.    46.0        Tim & Christy Wolf, Little Valley, NY
4.    27.5        Richard Burgey, Rochester, NY

Tomato (1):

1.    2.75        Steve Westcott

Longest Gourd (1):

1.     80.85”        David McMillan, Macedon, NY

The Oswego Children’s Theater to Present a Twin Bill of “Rip Van Winkle” and “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow”

The Oswego Children’s Theater next production, a twin bill of “Rip Van Winkle” and “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow”, was written by the late Oswego State Theater Professor Rosemary Nesbitt. These plays were part of a series of works written by Mrs. Nesbitt, and performed annually under her direction designed to be performed for children and in many cases by children Often these productions were first introduction to theater for many area residents.

The plays are based on the stories of early American author Washington Irving, set amongst the Dutch farmers of New York’s Hudson valley. The first play tells the tale of the affable but slightly lazy Rip Van Winkle. Rip goes off by himself into the haunted Catskill Mountains after an argument with his wife There he meets the ghostly crew of Henry Hudson’s Half Moon bowling on a mountain top, and after joining them in a drink sleeps for twenty years.

The second show relates the story of the pretentious Icabod Crane. Crane has come to the small community of Sleepy Hollow to teach school, where he quickly attracts the attention of the beautiful Katrina Van Tassel. Katrina is impressed with Icabod’s education, but her interest in the teacher arouses the jealousy of her erstwhile beau, Brom Bones. Bones tries to scare away the superstitious Icabod by telling him the tale of the Headless Horseman. The story ends with one of the first chase scenes in American literature, and leaves the audience to decide for themselves what happened to Icabod Crane.

Richard Mosher will direct the First show, “Rip Van Winkle”. Wayne and Kelly Mosher will direct second show, “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow”. Both shows will feature large cast of area children and adults.

The Oswego Children’s Theater production of “Rip Van Winkle” and “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” will be presented on October 16, 17, 21st, 23 and 24 at 8:00 PM with matinee performances on October 18, 24 and 25 at 2:00 PM. Tickets are $10 for Adults, $8 for Seniors and $5 for Students. . For reservations call 315 342-5265

Community Invited To Nesbitt Tribute

OSWEGO, NY – The Oswego community is invited to attend a tribute in celebration of the life of Rosemary S. Nesbitt, long-time city historian, founder of the H. Lee White Marine Museum and consummate community activist.

Rosemary Nesbitt

Rosemary Nesbitt

The event will begin promptly at 7 p.m. Friday near Rosemary Nesbitt’s Recognition Monument and the Kingsford Bell in Breitbeck Park.

Those attending are encouraged to bring chairs or blankets for seating.

The public will be invited to share their remebrances of Mrs. Nesbitt as well.

A reception at the H. Lee White Marine Museum will follow the memorial service.

For more information, call 342-0480 or visit www.hleewhitemarinemuseum.com

City Plans Memorial For Rosemary Nesbitt

OSWEGO, NY – At Monday night’s Common Council meeting, Mercedes Niess, director of the H. Lee White Marine Museum, thanked the aldermen for the recognition the city bestowed on the late Rosemary Nesbitt.

It’s been a tough week with Mrs. Nesbitt taking ill and passing away, Niess told the councilors.

<p>Mrs. Rosemary Nesbitt.</p>

Mrs. Rosemary Nesbitt.

The 84-year-old Distinguished Teaching professor at SUNY Oswego and city historian, passed away on Aug. 2. She was also the founder and immediate past director of the Marine Museum.

“I would like to thank the city for everything that you did for Rosemary Nesbitt,” Niess said, her voice cracking with emotion.

She helped the family with the arrangements.

They knew Mrs. Nesbitt was very involved in the community. “But I don’t think they really knew the extent of the love of this community had for her,” Niess added. “So, when we saw all the flags at half-staff and the police officers at every intersection, with their heads bowed, it was an amazing tribute to a wonderful person. So, thank you very much.”

She invited the council to a memorial celebration in honor of Mrs. Nesbitt’s life to be held this Friday in Breitbeck Park at 7 p.m.

There will be some speakers, but anyone will be able to share their remembrances about Mrs. Nesbitt, she noted.

In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the H. Lee White Marine Museum, West First Street Pier, Oswego; St. Mary’s Restoration Fund, 103 W. Seventh St., Oswego; or the United Way of Greater Oswego County, 1 S. First St., Fulton.

Committee Approves Requests To Use Public Space

OSWEGO, NY – At its meeting Monday night, the Physical Services Committee OK’d the use of public space for a memorial service for Rosemary Nesbitt.

The flag at City Hall is at half-staff in memory of Rosemary Nesbitt.

The flag at City Hall is at half-staff in memory of Rosemary Nesbitt.

A public celebration of Rosemary’s life will be held Aug. 14 at 7 p.m. in Breitbeck Park.

In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the H. Lee White Marine Museum, West First Street Pier, Oswego; St. Mary’s Restoration Fund, 103 W. Seventh St., Oswego; or the United Way of Greater Oswego County, 1 S. First St., Fulton.

The 84-year-old Distinguished Teaching professor at SUNY Oswego and city historian, passed away on Sunday morning.

Other requests for use of public space were made by:

Daniel Enwright – the owner of a single-family dwelling at 106 E. Mohawk St. wants to construct a 9′ X 18′ open deck fronting on East Mohawk Street.

Kenneth Calkins – the owner of a commercial building (Parts Plus) at 341 W. First St. wants to place a 3′ X 2′ X 2.5′ A-frame sign between the curb and the sidewalk fronting on West First Street.

Thomas Flett – the owner of a commercial building (Port City Glass) at 195 E. First St. wants to place a 30″ X 30″ X 30″ A-frame sign between the curb and the sidewalk fronting on East First Street.

Classic banner currently across the street outside the Speedway.

Classic banner currently across the street outside the Speedway.

Steve Gioia of Oswego Speedway, wants to install a temporary 3′ X 30′ banner across East Albany Street, announcing “Classic Weekend” to be held Sept. 4-6.

Lawrence VonHoltz – the owner and occupant of a single-family dwelling at 20 Singleton St. wants to construct an 8′ X 14′ story addition over an existing storm sewer easement.

Also, Mike Smith, DPW commissioner, requested use of city property on behalf of the Oswego County Council on Alcoholism and Addictions.

The organization would like to use Washington Square Park for a “Fun Day in the Park” event to be held on Aug. 27.

The committee sent the requests to the full council for consideration.

Community Remembers Rosemary Nesbitt

OSWEGO, NY – I learned a great deal from Rosemary Nesbitt. And, the education didn’t cease over the course of more than three decades since I left the classroom.

Mrs. Nesbitt passed away peacefully on Sunday, with her family by her side.

She was a Distinguished Teaching professor at SUNY Oswego, where she will be fondly remembered as an inspiring educator.

She taught me many things besides the theater; things such as compassion, tolerance of others and the importance of giving back to the community.

Years ago, when I returned to the Port City to hone my skills as a journalist, Mrs. Nesbitt had one more lesson for me at our first interview.

I don’t recall exactly the reason for the article. But I remember as if it were yesterday Mrs. Nesbitt laying down the law.

Mrs. Rosemary Nesbitt.

Mrs. Rosemary Nesbitt.

“In your article, sir, on second reference and all subsequent references – you shall call me Mrs.,” she instructed, adding, “I worked harder for that MRS than a PhD.”

Even though she was smiling, I’m sure she was rather serious.

Mrs. Nesbitt cared about the Port City and its residents cared about her.

“Oswego has been very good to me … very good,” she said often.

At one event in June of 2001, she told of the “great outpouring of affection and concern” she received during the May 7 block fire that spring.

Her home, which is festively decorated during the holidays, was right behind the businesses that burned on West Bridge Street.

“I am very grateful for the outpouring of concern, not only for me but for my house as well,” she said. “As I was sitting on the other side of the street, watching my house and the fire, perfect strangers came up to me and asked if I was all right and if I needed a place to sleep that night.”

One comment, she added, was extra touching.

“A little girl, who was walking past with her mother, stopped and said, ‘you can’t let anything happen to the Christmas house,’” Mrs. Nesbitt said. “That really touched me.”

Mrs. Nesbitt’s father played a big part why she was so involved in her community.

“When we were growing up, he told us, ‘you must remember, if you accept all the benefits of a democratic society, you must give something back. You can’t take it for granted,’” she said.

That is why she continued to volunteer.

Among the causes and organizations she has been involved with over the years are the United Way, Harborfest, St. Mary’s Church and the H. Lee White Marine Museum.

The first inkling I had that something might be wrong was the Friday of Harborfest’s annual Children’s Parade.

Mrs. Nesbitt was to be the grand marshal and ride along in a horse-drawn carriage. She was to receive a special recognition at the end of the parade.

However, she never arrived and no one had an explanation.

It wasn’t until more than a week later that we learned she had taken a turn for the worst.

Everywhere you went today (Aug. 3), it was easy to find someone with a memory to share of how Mrs. Nesbitt touched their lives.

In 1988, she was appointed by Mayor Terry Hammill to chair the Sesquicentennial celebration to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the chartering of the city of Oswego.

As city historian Mrs. Nesbitt was responsible for the oversight of historic development within the city including the preservation of the Oswego West Pierhead Lighthouse.

“I, like a great many other people in our city, thought of Rosemary as one of the most positive parts of the image we enjoy in Central New York,” Hammill said. “Oswego would have been a lesser place without her, and her service to all of us was without equal.”

“I first met Mrs. Nesbitt when I was in elementary school, when I was in sixth grade. She directed the school play at St. Mary’s School and treated it like a major production,” recalls Bill Foley. “She really sparked my interest in performing and theatre. In college she was my performance teacher and her creativity and ability to inspire was amazing.”

In late summer, she would share local lore and ghost stories during the annual Tales of the Haunted Harbor.

“My daughters really enjoyed her storytelling. She brought their imagination to life especially her Halloween tales,” Foley said.

For many years, Rosemary Nesbitt participated in most of the major events in the Port City. She is seen here at the ribbon cutting ceremony last November re-opening the Bridge Street Bridge.

For many years, Rosemary Nesbitt participated in most of the major events in the Port City. She is seen here at the ribbon cutting ceremony last November re-opening the Bridge Street Bridge.

“She was such a great supporter of education,” said Oswego Schools Superintendent Bill Crist. “She is going to be missed; she just pulled so many things together, culturally and educationally. She was tireless.”

“One of our most remarkable faculty members, Rosemary Nesbitt was the very model of community engagement. Whether spearheading the development of the H. Lee White Marine Museum, benefiting the community through leading United Way drives, or telling spellbinding tales of local history to children of all ages, Rosemary left a resonating, long-lasting and far-ranging impact on us all,” SUNY Oswego President Deborah F. Stanley said upon learning of the passing of the Distinguished Professor of Theatre. “She was a tireless community advocate who cared passionately for Oswego and put a lifetime of energy into letting people know what a special community Oswego is. Rosemary herself played a large role in making Oswego the special place that it is today.”

Whenever she was acknowledged for her efforts, Mrs. Nesbitt would always point out she didn’t do everything alone.

“It’s nice to receive an award,” Mrs. Nesbitt said.

But, she would add, the best part for her was seeing all the friends who came out to share her special occasions.

Ever humble and gracious, she would always share an accolade “with everyone who helped me achieve it.”

“Oswego lost a very valuable and special person in Rosemary Nesbitt. She was very passionate in her beliefs and she lived them,” said Oswego County Legislator Paul Santore. “She took on the persona of Dr. Mary Walker and was a staunch advocate for woman’s rights and equality and was forever teaching us all. She will be sorely missed.”

“Rosemary always found the good in Oswego,” Bill Reily pointed out. “She epitomized it.”

“She was a local treasure,” Foley added.

A public funeral will be held on Wednesday at 11 a.m. in St. Mary of The Assumption Roman Catholic Church, Oswego.

There are no calling hours and internment will be private.

A public celebration of Rosemary’s life will be held Aug. 14 at 7 p.m. in Breitbeck Park.

In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the H. Lee White Marine Museum, West First Street Pier, Oswego; St. Mary’s Restoration Fund, 103 W. Seventh St., Oswego; or the United Way of Greater Oswego County, 1 S. First St., Fulton.

Oswego’s Historian Dies: Rosemary Nesbitt, 84

The woman who brought history alive in Oswego for decades has died.

Rosemary Nesbitt died Sunday, 84 years old, ending a life of documenting Oswego’s history and spreading those stories to others through theater, books and talks.

Enjoy this slideshow of Rosemary in action:

Rosemary S. Nesbitt, 84, 08/02/2009

OSWEGO, NY – Rosemary S. Nesbitt, 84 of Oswego, passed away peacefully on Sunday Aug. 2, 2009, with her family by her side.

Mrs. Nesbitt was born on Oct. 12, 1924, in Baldwinsville, NY, to the late Matthew and Mary Louise Sinnett.

She was educated in the Baldwinsville schools as a child, and was a proud graduate of Syracuse University with a major in theater graduating Magna Cum Laude in 1947.

<p>Mrs. Rosemary Nesbitt.</p>

Mrs. Rosemary Nesbitt.

Mrs. Nesbitt was a college professor for more than 40 years, educating students at Wells College, Syracuse University, and SUNY Oswego.

In 1955, Mrs. Nesbitt married George R. Nesbitt Sr., who predeceased her in 1971.

In 1959, Mrs. Nesbitt adopted Oswego as her home, and worked tirelessly to bring to life the rich history of the Oswego area.

She was a Distinguished Teaching professor at the State University of New York at Oswego where she will be fondly remembered as an inspiring educator and as the director of the Oswego children’s theater.

She held this position for 20 years, during which time she authored 15 plays for children.

Mrs. Nesbitt’s devotion to children is also revealed in the two historical novels she wrote for children: The Great Rope and Colonel Meacham’s Giant Cheese.

In addition to her professional activities, she also was very active in civic affairs and volunteerism.

She was the founder and director of the H. Lee White Marine Museum, retiring from the directorship in 2008.

Mrs. Nesbitt served as the first and only female chairperson of the Port of Oswego Authority for 10 years.

For eight years she served as campaign chair for the United Way.

Mrs. Nesbitt spearheaded the establishment of several historical monuments in Oswego.

A monument to the women and children of the northern frontier was erected during the Bicentennial followed by a monument honoring the American war dead from the Battle of Oswego in 1814.

Mrs. Nesbitt along with a group of local visionary’s created a summer festival in 1987 called Oswegofest.

The festival grew into what is now known as Harborfest.

In 1988, she was appointed by Mayor Terry Hammill to chair the Sesquicentennial celebration to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the chartering of the city of Oswego.

One of Mrs. Nesbitt’s proudest accomplishments was a yearlong research project which secured Dr. Mary Edwards Walker a position in the National Women’s Hall of Fame.

As city historian Mrs. Nesbitt was responsible for the oversight of historic development within the city including the preservation of the Oswego West Pierhead Lighthouse.

Some of Mrs. Nesbitt’s  many other accomplishments include: Women of The Year in Cultural Development (Post Standard) 1971, State University of NY’s Chancellor’s award for Excellence in teaching 1972-1973, “Citizen of The Year” Oswego Jaycees 1974, George R. Arents Pioneer medal for Achievement in Education (Syracuse University) 1975, Freedoms Foundation of Valley Forge George Washington Honors Medal 1975, Oswego Zonta Woman of the Year Amelia Earhart award 1994, “Woman of Distinction” NY State Senate 2002, and many more.

Mrs. Nesbitt is also listed in: Who’s Who in America, Dictionary of American Authors, Contemporary Leaders of America, and 2000 Outstanding Women of the World.

On a personal note, Mrs. Nesbitt  took part in many adventures including, an extensive bicycle trip across Europe after World War II,  witnessing the Coronation of  Queen Elizabeth II, crossing the Atlantic on the QE II during a hurricane, treating her sister to a graduation trip to Mexico in 1950, and taking her 4 children on camping trips across the United States.

Mrs. Nesbitt is survived by her brother, John (Joan) Sinnett of Syracuse; son, George (Dianna Benson) Nesbitt; three daughters, Mary (Jonathan) Kamelhar of Pennsylvania, Anne (Lynn) Babcock and Elizabeth (Victor) Martin of Oswego; six grandchildren, Elizabeth, Brian, Alexandra, Emily, Devlin and Chloe; and many nieces and nephews.

She was predeceased by her sister, Patricia Flammer.

A public funeral will be held on Wednesday at 11 a.m. in St. Mary of The Assumption Roman Catholic Church, Oswego.

There are no calling hours and internment will be private.

A public celebration of Rosemary’s life will be held Aug. 14 at 7 p.m. in Breitbeck Park.

In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the H. Lee White Marine Museum, West First Street Pier, Oswego; St. Mary’s Restoration Fund, 103 W. Seventh St., Oswego; or the United Way of Greater Oswego County, 1 S. First St., Fulton.

The family wishes to thank, doctors Ram, Alcasid, Duggan, Mandanas and Thotambilu and the ICU, and third floor staff of Oswego Hospital for their loving care of our mother.

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Registration opens for CNY Arts Center Annual Arts Fest

CNY Arts Center announces vendor registration is open for the fourth annual Arts Fest June 14 from 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. at the Fulton Community Center Ice Rink on West Broadway in Fulton. The event brings artists and crafters together with handmade original art on display for sale along with food vendors, and hands on art.

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Early Release Day for Pre-K, Elementary Students April 25

On April 25, there will be an early dismissal day for students in grades Pre-K through 6 in the Fulton City School District for parent-teacher conferences.

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