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BOCES Early Childhood Education Students Write Children’s Books

MEXICO, NY -BOCES Students in Missie Nabinger’s Early Childhood Education program recently finished writing and illustrating original children’s stories.
Having completed a series of classes about the importance of reading to young children, how to select appropriate books for different ages and how to be effective storytellers, the students took the literary plunge and actually each wrote and illustrated a book of their own.

English teacher Linda Knowles came into the class and did a workshop about literary elements and the various other components that make up a story. It was then on to a brainstorming session where the prospective authors came up with possible themes for their books. Each student then developed a theme making sure the book would be age appropriate for the group he or she is currently working with at either Pulaski’s Little Luke’s Daycare Center or Lura Sharp Elementary School, also located in Pulaski.  Rough drafts were written and approved and the stories were then written into hard cover bound books. The illustrations were the next step in the process and students livened up their stories with either computer generated or hand drawn pictures.

The final step in the process will be when the books are shared with the children at Little Luke’s and Lura Sharp School. Overall, the project was a great learning experience that the students enjoyed and they look forward to sharing the final product with the youngsters helping to instill in them a love of reading.

Back row (left to right): Teacher, Missie Nabinger, Britney Moody, Kaylea Morse, Ben Diblasi, Kristina Miller, Casey Hall. Front row (left to right): Tricia Kelly, Ashley Giblin, Courtney Bartlett, Shiela Oakes, Kaylee Fisher

Oswego County BOCES Culinary Arts students make the cut

Lending a helping hand during a meat cutting demonstration in the Oswego County BOCES Culinary Arts’ kitchen was Career and Technical Education student Nicole Shepard, Hannibal. She is pictured above packaging the sliced pork liver that was prepared by special guest visitor and meat cutter Fritz Hammond.

Lending a helping hand during a meat cutting demonstration in the Oswego County BOCES Culinary Arts’ kitchen was Career and Technical Education student Nicole Shepard, Hannibal. She is pictured above packaging the sliced pork liver that was prepared by special guest visitor and meat cutter Fritz Hammond.

 
Sweet, hot, Italian, and more. Oswego County BOCES Culinary Arts students Mike Daghita, Allie Taylor (center), and Casey Henderson from the Hannibal Central School District learn about the sausage making process from guest visitor Fritz Hammond. Mr. Hammond stopped by to speak with Career and Technical Education students at OCB about the meat processing industry and gave a hands-on demonstration.

Sweet, hot, Italian, and more. Oswego County BOCES Culinary Arts students Mike Daghita, Allie Taylor (center), and Casey Henderson from the Hannibal Central School District learn about the sausage making process from guest visitor Fritz Hammond. Mr. Hammond stopped by to speak with Career and Technical Education students at OCB about the meat processing industry and gave a hands-on demonstration.

 
Oswego County BOCES Culinary Arts Lead Instructor Chef Sara Falco is pictured above getting a hands-on lesson from meat cutter Fritz Hammond on how to tie a boneless rib end pork roast. Chef Falco invited Mr. Hammond into her classroom to talk about the meat processing industry along with training, apprenticeships, and job opportunities for his profession.

Oswego County BOCES Culinary Arts Lead Instructor Chef Sara Falco is pictured above getting a hands-on lesson from meat cutter Fritz Hammond on how to tie a boneless rib end pork roast. Chef Falco invited Mr. Hammond into her classroom to talk about the meat processing industry along with training, apprenticeships, and job opportunities for his profession.

Career and Technical Education students enrolled in the Culinary Arts program at Oswego County BOCES ‘make the cut’ during a recent live demonstration. Fritz Hammond, a local meat cutter with over 40 years of experience, stopped by the Culinary Arts’ kitchen to give students a hands-on lecture on what lead instructor Chef Sara Falco calls, “The art of meat cutting.’

“It’s all in the hands,” Mr. Hammond said as demonstrated pig processing and explained the different cuts of meat from a pig’s shoulder, loin, side, and leg or ham region and the process of brining, curing, and smoking pork products. He talked about the importance of safety and shared some techniques that make processing meat more efficient and effective.

The live demonstration was a precursor to the student’s upcoming unit on the methods of cooking where they will be tasked with preparing a roast using the dry heat method. In addition Chef Falco said, “It’s important for inspiring chefs to think about where meat comes from and also learn the significance of using local and sustainable products.”

The Culinary Arts program provides high school students with a solid foundation for food preparation and cooking methods, food-handling techniques, and sanitation procedures. For information about the Culinary Arts program or other Career and Technical Education offerings at Oswego County BOCES, call 315-963-4251 or visit the website at www.OswegoBOCES.org.

Students at Oswego County BOCES participate in second career-focused workshop

Paula Annesi, High School Coordinator for Bryant & Stratton College, talks with Oswego County BOCES Culinary Arts students Donna D’Orazio (Fulton), Sarah Shoults (Hannibal), Adam Coe (Fulton), and Nicole Shepard (Hannibal) about building a résumé that highlights their strengths, abilities, and skills. This résumé workshop was one in a series aimed at preparing students for careers beyond high school.

Paula Annesi, High School Coordinator for Bryant & Stratton College, talks with Oswego County BOCES Culinary Arts students Donna D’Orazio (Fulton), Sarah Shoults (Hannibal), Adam Coe (Fulton), and Nicole Shepard (Hannibal) about building a resume that highlights their strengths, abilities, and skills. This resume workshop was one in a series aimed at preparing students for careers beyond high school.

Bryant & Stratton College hosted the second in a series of career-focused workshops for students enrolled in Career and Technical Education (CTE) classes at Oswego County BOCES (OCB).

Paula Annesi, High School Coordinator for Byrant & Stratton, talked to students during the first workshop about choosing a career by examining themselves in four areas: skills, interests, personality and motivations. She gave them questions to consider when looking at career opportunities such as: “What are you good at?” “What are your best subjects in school?” “Are you an introvert or an extrovert?” and “How do you define success?” and gave them a quick, unofficial personality test to help them determine which careers best match with their personalities.

During her second and most recent visit, Annesi talked about building effective and functional resumes. She asked the students to be mindful of the purpose of a resume and said, “You’re not writing a resume to get a job, you’re writing a resume to get an interview.” She urged the students to perform a self-assessment to create a skills-based resume that focuses on featuring abilities and strengths that appeal to employers. Annesi pointed out that OCB’s CTE students have a “leg up” on other high school students because the programs at OCB allow real world work experience where students gain both ‘hard’ or technical skills related to a profession and ‘soft’ skills such as responsibility, integrity, organization, and critical thinking.

She went on to discuss the significance of a cover letter to introduce themselves and generate the interest of potential employers and stressed the importance of accuracy and grammar. Tied to this she spoke about the importance of image and perception including what is portrayed online because many employers today ‘google’ their applicants before they consider setting up an interview.

The third component to this workshop was one that she says many job-seekers overlook. The thank you note. “Taking the time to hand-write and deliver a thank you note is a nice gesture that shows employers you are serious and interested in the position being offered,” she said to the students.

The next Bryant and Stratton career-focused workshop hosted by Annesi will focus on the interview process. Students will be given an opportunity to present their cover letters and skills-based resumes to Annesi and a panel of professionals and then participate in mock job interviews.

Bryant & Stratton incidentally awards ten $1,000 scholarships each June to students enrolled in Career and Technical Education programs at Oswego County BOCES. For more information about the CTE programs at OCB visit www.OswegoBOCES.org.

Oswego County BOCES Public Information Meetings Scheduled

The public is welcome to attend the following informational meetings about the proposed Oswego County BOCES (OCB) renovation project:

  • Thursday, January 27, 2011 at 7:00 p.m. in the district office board room of the Sandy Creek Central School District.
  • Wednesday, February 9, 2011 at 6:30 p.m. in the district office board room of the Hannibal Central School District.
  • Wednesday, February 9, 2011 at 7:00 p.m. at Mexico Elementary School.
  • Tuesday, February 15, 2011 at 7:00 p.m. in the library media center of John C. Birdlebough High School in the Phoenix Central School District.
  • Wednesday, February 16, 2011 at 5:30 p.m. at Oswego County BOCES.
  • Thursday, February 17, 2011 at 6:30 p.m. in the cafeteria of Lura Sharp Elementary School in the Pulaski Academy and Central School District.
  • Tuesday, February 22, 2011 at 7:30 p.m. in the Fourth Street School board room of the Fulton City School District.

OCB representatives will present information and be available to answer questions during each of the meeting dates above. For information about the proposed Oswego County BOCES renovation project including voting information and polling locations, visit www.OswegoBOCES.org or call (315) 963-4222.

Paul Gugel Named Director Of Adult And Migrant Education At Oswego County BOCES

MEXICO, NY -  At their December meeting, the members of the Oswego County BOCES Board of Education approved the appointment of Paul Gugel in the newly created position of  Director of Adult & Migrant Education. Formerly the full time Director of Migrant Education, Gugel will now split his time fifty-fifty between the two areas.

The appointment seems almost meant to be for Gugel as he found himself feeling ready for a new type of challenge just before the position opened up. Having worked at BOCES since 1990 in the Migrant Education program, he feels strongly that the many similarities between the two programs make it a win-win situation for both. Much of Gugel’s background includes time spent working with entire migrant families including a lot of literacy type programming for the adults which is a big piece of what the adult education program is all about. He is familiar with the GED program and has extensive ties with many community partners who deal with job training and employment issues on a regular basis.

Another similarity Gugel sees is the respect he already has for the adult education students. “I find myself working with many students I’d consider heroes in the migrant program and adult education students are giving me a whole new set of people to look up to,” said Gugel. “I have the utmost respect for the effort and sacrifices required to make it all work, often times juggling family, job and classes all at the same time to further one’s opportunities,” he stated.

Gugel is also excited about learning the career side of things in Adult Education. “It is such a tangible process when you are able to see someone complete a program here at BOCES and immediately move into a whole new profession. It’s very rewarding to see such positive changes in a person’s life made possible through our programming,” he said.

Looking forward, Gugel plans to build on and strengthen the Adult Education Program working with employers, the Department of Labor, the Department of Employment and Training, VESID and other community partners to ensure that the services provided are of high quality and in line with industry standards and expectations.

Gugel is confident that the veteran staff already in place in both departments, as well as program consistency will keep things running smoothly even as he divides his time. “I have seen the staff in both offices consistently go above and beyond and we are all dedicated to the students we serve,” stated Gugel.

To contact Gugel with questions about Adult Education, call (315) 963-4256. To reach him about Migrant Education, call (315) 963-4265. His email address for both programs is pgugel@oswegoboces.org .

Paul Gugel takes on new challenges and duties at Oswego County BOCES as he is named Director of Adult & Migrant Education

Oswego County BOCES New Vision Information Night Scheduled Feb. 2

New Vision Information Night has been scheduled for Feb. 2, beginning at 6:30 p.m. at the Oswego County BOCES campus, 179 County Route 64 in Mexico. Students and their parents are invited to attend the informational evening to gather details about the New Vision classes offered through OCB.

Oswego County BOCES and SUNY Oswego’s School of Education have developed a partnership to host the New Vision Education Program in Sheldon Hall on the SUNY Oswego campus. This partnership envelopes the ideal of the New Vision concept, which encourages immersion-based opportunities for students in their chosen fields of study. The curriculum integrates English 12 Honors, Social Studies 12 Honors, and provides diverse rotations to allow students to experience all aspects of their chosen career pathway. In addition, students have the ability to obtain twelve college credits from SUNY Oswego: Psychology 100 “Principles of Human Behavior,” Education 210 “History of Education Since 1865,” and English 101 and 102 “English Composition I and English Composition II.” Oswego County BOCES will be providing the books for all classes as part of the New Vision experience. Students will spend three weekday afternoons in a traditional classroom setting on the campus. The remaining two days, students will explore diverse rotations throughout Oswego County focusing on careers in the educational field. New Vision students will also have access to various seminars and workshops designed specifically for them as well as access to many opportunities offered to SUNY Oswego college students.

New Vision – Allied Health has provided more than 300 Oswego County students the opportunity to enhance their college applications by experiencing various, exciting health care settings. Students are held to strict standards of confidentiality, professionalism, and academic performance. This college preparatory program is an excellent way for the ambitious high school student to obtain realistic experience and insightful knowledge while gaining independence and confidence.

Students spend half of the school day with New Vision – Allied Health, three days in the classroom for social studies, English or biology and two days on rotations in various health care settings. New Vision – Allied Health currently has 54 different sites in which our students observe the delivery of health care and offers twelve college credits through SUNY Oswego (6 credits of English and 6 credits of related science). Honors level Social Studies 12, English 12, and two credits of Health Occupations electives are integrated into the curriculum.

Oswego County BOCES and SUNY Oswego’s School of Education have also developed a partnership to host the New Vision Law and Government Program in Sheldon Hall on the SUNY Oswego campus. The curriculum integrates English 12 Honors, Social Studies 12 Honors, and provides diverse rotations to allow students to experience all aspects of their chosen career pathway. In addition, students have the ability to obtain twelve college credits from SUNY Oswego: Psychology 100 “Principles of Human Behavior,” Public Justice 102 “Introduction to Human Services,” and English 101 and 102 “English Composition I and English Composition II.” Oswego County BOCES will be providing the books for all classes as part of the New Vision experience. Students will spend three weekday mornings in a traditional classroom setting on the campus. The remaining two days, students will explore diverse rotations throughout Oswego County focusing on careers in the law, government, and public safety fields. New Vision students will also have access to various seminars and workshops designed specifically for them as well as access to many opportunities offered to SUNY Oswego college students.

Students must apply in their junior year for acceptance in their senior year into the New Vision programs and meet stringent requirements to be considered. Included in the requirements are a qualifying GPA, an interview process, two writing samples, and letters of reference.

For more information about New Vision courses or other Career and Technical Education classes at Oswego County BOCES, contact Ronald Camp, Director of CTE at 963-4433.

OCB students and staff collect paper products for Francis House

Students and staff at OCB collected paper products for Francis House, on Michaels Avenue in Syracuse. Francis House provides a home and a supportive extended family to people with terminal illnesses with a prognosis of six months or less to live. Pictured with the paper products is Marian Becker (left), fellow OCB teacher, Barb Kickbush and student helper Mike Buffett.

Francis House, on Michaels Avenue in Syracuse provides a home and a supportive extended family to people with terminal illnesses with a prognosis of six months or less to live. Staff and volunteers function as an extended family offering physical, emotional and spiritual support. 24-hour medical supervision is provided by licensed home health care agencies. The house runs completely on donations and there is no charge to its residents.

Marian Becker, a special education teacher at Oswego County BOCES, volunteers at Francis House and asked if there was something she could do to provide some needed resources to help those who run the special house. Two items are always in demand, she was told: paper towels and bath tissue. She decided to ask if her students at OCB and fellow staff members would like to help with a collection of these items. The results were 240 rolls of bath tissue and 76 rolls of paper towels. The paper products created a small mountain in one area of her classroom. Becker will deliver the products to Francis House early in the New Year.

Francis House was created in 1991 by the sisters of St. Francis and since that time the home has served over 1,000 residents with terminal illnesses. The values of Francis House are to accept each resident unconditionally and ensure that they are treated with dignity, respect and compassion.

For more information about Francis House, visit their website at www.francishouseny.org.

OCB Staff Unite to Support Local Migrant Families

Migrant Education Outreach Program Coordinator Paul Gugel (left) stands amid a sea of boxes being prepared for delivery to families in the migrant program during the holiday season. Helping to coordinate the annual drive and also pictured are Claudia Cook (center) and Jen Bradford (right) with some of the many items collected. Employees at Oswego County BOCES contributed items or provided financial support to the program, which delivered over 34 boxes to help provide a happy holiday to many families who are particularly hard hit during the winter months.

Each year the Oswego County BOCES (OCB) Migrant Education Outreach Program (MEOP) works to provide Holiday Baskets to the migrant students and families they serve, and the OCB staff responds with generous support. Paul Gugel, Migrant Education Coordinator spoke of the response by employees saying, “People are really generous. We are very thankful for the strong, ongoing support that we have received from BOCES’ employees for this project and other efforts to assist our students and their families.  It is a pleasure working with such a terrific group of people.”

The baskets contained family-specific items including familiar food items from their native culture, and a gift item such as art supplies, games, gloves, mittens, hats, etc. for each member of the migrant family.

This time of year is often very difficult for these families whose income is dependent on agriculture, and approximately 34 boxes were distributed to those assisted by the Migrant Education Outreach Program, helping to brighten their holidays.

For more information about how you can assist the MEOP and their outreach programs, contact Paul Gugel at Oswego County BOCES, at (315) 963-4251.

OCB Deaf and Hard of Hearing Club Supports Local Animal Shelter

Oswego County BOCES Deaf and Hard of Hearing Club members (left to right) Courtney Foster (Fulton), Amira Ragab (Pulaski), Char Purchas (Mexico), and Tonaya Gorton (Mexico) are pictured with some of the items they collected to benefit the dogs, cats, and other animals fostered at the Oswego Animal Shelter. Absent at the time of the photo was club members Jonathan Roll (Canastota), Kyle Lynch (Fulton), Heidi Brown (Sandy Creek), Brianna Gillette (Mexico), and Josh LaCelle (Mexico).

Oswego County BOCES Deaf and Hard of Hearing Club members (left to right) Courtney Foster (Fulton), Amira Ragab (Pulaski), Char Purchas (Mexico), and Tonaya Gorton (Mexico) are pictured with some of the items they collected to benefit the dogs, cats, and other animals fostered at the Oswego Animal Shelter. Absent at the time of the photo was club members Jonathan Roll (Canastota), Kyle Lynch (Fulton), Heidi Brown (Sandy Creek), Brianna Gillette (Mexico), and Josh LaCelle (Mexico).

The Oswego County BOCES (OCB) Deaf/Hard of Hearing Club took on a community service project that was aimed at helping homeless and abandoned animals in Oswego County. Starting in November student club members made it their mission to collect supplies for the dogs, cats, and other household pets currently awaiting adoption at the Oswego Animal Shelter. The students decorated boxes for the donation drive and went to some of their local communities and schools with a list of the new and gently used items they were looking to collect for the local sheltering program.

The outpouring of support surpassed the club’s goal and the students were able to donate and personally deliver hundreds of items including stuffed animals, blankets, food, toys, grooming supplies, cleaning products and supplies, and more for local animals in need.

The OCB Deaf and/or Hard of Hearing Educational Program provides comprehensive educational services to children through teachers of the deaf, interpreters, itinerant teachers, speech/language therapists, counselors, audiologists, notetakers, and more. In the fall of this year, OCB started the Deaf/Hard of Hearing Club for students in grades 5 through 12 and their parents.

The club meets on a monthly basis and provides students with an opportunity to socialize with their peers, organize projects that benefit their local communities, and participate in fun and educational-based learning activities. For parents, the club gives them an opportunity to engage in open conversations about the joys, successes, and challenges of raising a child who is deaf and/or hard of hearing. OCB staff members provide professional support and conduct roundtable discussions where the parents share advice and resources with each other and talk about how they answer their child’s tough questions like “Why me?”

For more information about the Oswego County BOCES Deaf/Hard of Hearing Club, contact Tammy Seymour at (315) 591-0657 or Kathy Titman at (315) 591-5292.

Oswego County BOCES Students ‘Believe’ In Make-A-Wish Foundation

Arriving directly from the North Pole, Santa Claus stopped by Oswego County BOCES to pose for a picture with SkillsUSA members and the many letters to Santa written by OCB students to benefit the Make-A-Wish Foundation. SkillsUSA members above include the 2010-2011 elected officers from the morning Career and Technical Education programs: President Bethany Blount, Central Square, (standing, left); Reporter Sara Bartlett, Fulton, (standing, right); Treasurer Elizabeth King, Central Square, (seated, left); and Parliamentarian Sarah Fox, Oswego.

Arriving directly from the North Pole, Santa Claus stopped by Oswego County BOCES to pose for a picture with SkillsUSA members and the many letters to Santa written by OCB students to benefit the Make-A-Wish Foundation. SkillsUSA members above include the 2010-2011 elected officers from the morning Career and Technical Education programs: President Bethany Blount, Central Square, (standing, left); Reporter Sara Bartlett, Fulton, (standing, right); Treasurer Elizabeth King, Central Square, (seated, left); and Parliamentarian Sarah Fox, Oswego.

Students at Oswego County BOCES (OCB) embraced the magic of the holiday season by rallying to support the Central New York chapter of the Make-A-Wish Foundation. In late November OCB students took on a community service project and began writing letters for Macy’s annual a million reasons to believe campaign. For each letter received, the department store donates $1 to the Make-A-Wish Foundation, up to $1 million dollars, to help grant the wishes of children between the ages of 2-1/2 and 18 who are living with life-threatening medical conditions.

It didn’t take long for the believe campaign to become contagious at OCB and for students to show their overwhelming support in the power of a wish to help spread joy and hope this holiday season. Within just a few short weeks the believe mailbox at OCB was filled with 281 letter submissions.

All money raised locally, from locally submitted letters, stays in the Central New York region; so the students at OCB are helping grant the wishes of children living in their own communities. Historically, well over 1,000 local children have had their wishes granted through the Central New York chapter of the Make-A-Wish Foundation.

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Cop Logs: Sheriff’s Office 08/27/2014

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