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School District Votes To Appeal Dismissal Of Nuke Plant Pact Challenge

OSWEGO, NY – Following some lengthy committee meetings and another debate regarding the 2011-12 budget Tuesday night, the Oswego City School District board of education members convened for a brief meeting.

There were three items on the agenda.

Board members voted 6-0-1 on the first – a decision to appeal the state Supreme Court ruling that dismissed the district’s petition challenging the tax agreement with Nine Mile Point Unit I.

Board president Dave White was absent.

In early March, State Supreme Court Justice Hugh Gilbert dismissed the district’s petition.

According to Kevin C. Caraccioli, the town’s attorney, Justice Gilbert dismissed the petition stating, “It should not have been filed as a challenge to the assessment set by the Scriba Board of Assessment Review.”

The assessment can be challenged only in a tax grievance petition, the judge ruled.

The school district can’t use this procedure to challenge the assessment, he said, adding that only the property owner (Scriba) can file a tax grievance.

According to the district’s resolution, the board of education disagrees with Gilbert’s decision and authorizes its outside counsel, Paul T. Sheppard, “to file a notice of appeal.”

Last summer, the county, Scriba and the district negotiated a one-year tax deal Constellation Nuclear Energy Group, the owners of the power plant.

Scriba and the county approved it; the school district didn’t.

The district began the challenge in an attempt to receive more tax revenue from the plant than it would receive under the deal.

The Scriba Board of Assessment Review assessed the nuclear power plant at $280 million.

The school district claimed the plant’s assessed value was $600 million, according to a New Hampshire firm that specializes in appraising nuclear power plants.

The other two agenda items, both of which were approved Tuesday night, were filing of the budget for the school year 2011 – 2012 and proposition #1 (the 2011 – 2012 tentative budget) for the May 17 budget vote.

The budget proposal is $74, 744,748 and contains a  zero percent tax levy increase.

Oswego School District’s Challenge Of Nuclear Plant Tax Pact Is Dismissed

OSWEGO, NY – The Oswego City School District’s challenge regarding the tax agreement Oswego County and the town of Scriba have with Nine Mile Point Unit I was dismissed last week in state Supreme Court.

According to Kevin C. Caraccioli, the town’s attorney, Justice Hugh Gilbert dismissed the district’s petition stating, “It should not have been filed as a challenge to the assessment set by the Scriba Board of Assessment Review.”

“I am pleased with Justice Gilbert’s decision,” said Scriba Supervisor Kenneth Burdick. “I always felt that the actions of the Town of Scriba were justified. This decision confirms my belief. I hope the parties can get back to negotiating a comprehensive agreement that will benefit the entire community.”

In his ruling, dated Friday, Gilbert said the assessment only can be challenged in a tax grievance petition.

The school district can’t use this procedure to challenge the assessment, he continued.

Only the property owner (Scriba) can file a tax grievance.

“We just received (the decision) from our attorney,” Oswego School Superintendent Bill Crist said Monday afternoon. “Until our attorney and the board of education goes over it, there will be no comment from the district.”

Last summer, the county, Scriba and the district negotiated a one-year tax deal Constellation Nuclear Energy Group, the owners of the power plant.

Scriba and the county approved it; the school district didn’t.

The district began the challenge in an attempt to receive more tax revenue from the plant than it would receive under the deal.

Oswego School Board Hires Binghamton Attorney To Sue Over NiMi I Tax Deal

OSWEGO, NY – Following an executive session Monday night, the Oswego City School District board of education voted 6-1 to sue over the tax agreement for Nine Mile Point Unit I.

They hired Binghamton real estate and assessment attorney Paul Sheppard.

According to the resolution, he will be paid an hourly rate. The rate hasn’t been established yet.

The resolution reads: “…the Oswego City School District Board of Education approve the appointment of Paul Sheppard to move forward with legal responsibilities relating to litigation in relation to the Tax Assessment Agreement for Nine Mile Point Nuclear Power Station Number One. Sheppard will be reimbursed on an agreed hourly rate.”

The motion was made by Fran Hoefer and seconded by Sam Tripp.

Earlier this spring, the district, town of Scriba and Oswego County negotiated a tentative one-year tax deal with Constellation Energy Nuclear Group, owners of Nine Mile Point Unit I.

The agreement had to be approved by all three taxing entities; the school district, however, was the only one to not approve the pact.

Under the proposed deal, the district would have received $6,358,000 from Nine Mile Point I for the 2010-2011 school year; $4 million more than it received this past school year under the PILOT.

Based on the one-year assessment for the plant of $280 million set by the Scriba board of assessment review, the district will receive about $6,031,200.

The board voted against the proposed agreement because, as board vice president John Dunsmoor put it, “There is too much money left on the table.

The majority of the board believes they are entitled to more money and by making the plant “pay its fair share,” they will receive more.

Board president Dave White referred all questions to the superintendent.

“At this time, we are investigating the proper vehicle for challenging the tax assessment agreement regarding the Nine Mile Point No. 1 facility,” explained Bill Crist, superintendent.

At the board’s meeting, it voted to retain counsel on an hourly fee basis in accordance with (Mr. Sheppard’s) firm’s standard retainer agreement, Crist said. Obviously, the fee is dependent on the hours ultimately expended in connection with the matter, he added.

“The goal, in any tax assessment proceeding, is to arrive at an accurate value for the property at issue, such that the property owner pays its fair share of property taxes to all taxing jurisdictions,” Crist said. “Fictional values designed to reach a particular end are unfair to other taxpayers, and side agreements which divert funds from one taxing jurisdiction to another are likewise inappropriate.”

“Obviously multiple interests and issues converge here and I don’t minimize their complexity.  There is a shared history of past agreements and disagreements in the quest for equity on the part of all concerned,” according to  Jim Tschudy, the only board member to vote against hiring the lawyer. “I believe the more promising way of proceeding toward ultimate objectives turns on productive discussion and resolution as opposed to the adversarial route the Board majority has chosen.”

Solutions driven by adversarial initiatives often yield or perpetuate legacies of recrimination and antagonism, he added.

“Agreement inevitably involves compromise, requires patience and persistence as well discerning where the path to mutually equitable benefit leads,” Tschudy noted. “Good people have often disagreed over which route best served their interests.”

He referred specific questions to the superintendent of schools.

Negotiations will soon get under way for a new deal with NiMi I and II.

The PILOT agreement for Unit I expires at the end of this year; Unit II’s expires in December 2011.

County Approves One-Year PILOT With Constellation

OSWEGO, NY – Two out of three are onboard.

The Oswego County Legislature voted 23-0-2 Thursday night to join the town of Scriba in accepting a one-year PILOT (Payment In Lieu Of Taxes) agreement with Constellation (owner of the Nine Mile Point Unit I nuclear power plant).

Legislators Mike Kunzwiler and Jim Oldenburg, both Constellation employees, abstained from the vote.

Kevin Caraccioli ... favors agreement

Kevin Caraccioli ... favors agreement

Fran Hoefer ... opposes agreement

Fran Hoefer ... opposes agreement

Of the three entities involved, the town of Scriba voted to accept the deal while the Oswego City District Board of Education voted against it.

An amendment to Thursday’s resolution allowed the county to move forward with the town on the PILOT, without the school district.

Kevin Caraccioli, the town of Scriba’s attorney, addressed the legislature, encouraging them to support the agreement.

“I want to give you the assurance that the town of Scriba will be standing committed to honor the agreement that was struck with Constellation, for Nine Mile Point Unit I,” he told the legislators.

It is important to understand, that under New York State law, the municipality in which the property is located sets the assessment, he pointed out.

“The town of Scriba is host to three nuclear power plants. As such, we are the assessor, we set the assessed value,” he said.

There is strength in numbers, he said explaining Scriba’s desire to partner with the county and school district for “such a significant, and I dare say historic agreement such as a nuclear tax agreement.”

The power plant will be paying approximately 275 percent more in taxes next year, going from $4 million to $11 million, he said.

Caraccioli described the deal as “a temporary one-year bridge, this is not a five-year deal that everybody is locked into. It continues our negotiations in good faith with a company that is well-received in this community and is a part of this community.”

There is a lot of benefit in negotiating with Constellation, he added.

The best thing would be for all three entities to join in a deal with Constellation.

But if that’s not the case, the attorney said Scriba will exercise its authority, as the assessing unit, and enter into an agreement with the county that will fix a payment for the town and the county and establish an assessed value that will realize as close as possible the tax payment that the school district would otherwise receive – $4 million more than their budgeted figure that has already been passed.

Legislator Kunzwiler praised the bipartisan manner in which the county conducted the negotiation process.

Legislator Mike Kunzwiler, standing center, makes a point regarding the tentative agreement prior to the legislature’s vote Thursday night. Looking on, from left in foreground, are legislators Terry Wilbur and Morris Sorbello. In background from left are Jacob Mulcahey and Fred Beardsley.

Legislator Mike Kunzwiler, standing center, makes a point regarding the tentative agreement prior to the legislature’s vote Thursday night. Looking on, from left in foreground, are legislators Terry Wilbur and Morris Sorbello. In background from left are Jacob Mulcahey and Fred Beardsley.

“Any information we needed was given to us in a timely manner. It was a transparent process. I think that it’s wrong for people to use scare tactics and say things are being done behind closed doors,” he said referring to Oswego school board member (and former county legislator) Fran Hoefer’s remarks at the public hearing prior to the legislature meeting.

“I would have agreed with (Hoefer) 10 years ago. But, I can’t agree with him today,” Kunzwiler said. “Negotiations were not done openly with the legislature during the last agreement. This time it was.”

“This whole PILOT thing is a backroom deal cloaked in secrecy,” Hoefer said at the public hearing on the agreement. He was the only speaker

During the meeting, when Legislator Barb Brown sought information about the plant and spent fuel rods, Legislator Doug Malone interrupted.

“Point of order, Mr. Chairman. This ain’t got nothing to do about nothing. Now, step up to the plate and let’s go,” he said.

“A PILOT, to the school district leadership, is a big chunk of free cash,” Hoefer said. “A PILOT means the school district can go on a spending spree and the taxpayers get screwed! A PILOT, to the school district, means $4 million more in the bank, right in the middle of administrators’ salary negotiations!”

“Quite frankly, how the school district handles their portion of the money when they get it is none of our business. Whether they give their superintendent a raise or not is none of our concern,” Legislator Fred Beardsley pointed out.

“If the power plants go on the tax levy, the entire taxable value of this county goes up and everyone’s taxes go down!”

“It is extremely important that the public realize that irregardless of whether this plant goes on the tax rolls or in a PILOT agreement, the dollar value to the county taxpayers will be exactly the same,” Beardsley pointed out. “So, there is no dollar advantage for taking this one way or the other.”

“We need this money for next year’s budget. I know it’s not going to pay down my taxes 12 percent, I understand that,” Malone said. “This is just a stepping stone to get going, it’s been a fair process and I thank everybody for that.”

The county might be able to lower taxes next year, Oswego County Legislature Chairman Barry Leemann said, prompting Malone to respond, “Wanna bet lunch on that?”

“This is a one-year agreement that is setting the stage for the more important agreement which would follow; the agreement regarding Nine Mile II and the FitzPatrick plant,” Legislator Jack Proud said. “It is important that we maintain our trust. Something that’s negotiate din good faith, up front by all the entitles involved with a chance to ask questions, question information and do all those things and then is agreed up in good faith by all the entities is very important.”

If the county is going to be negotiating bigger agreements later, there has to be an element of trust and confidence, Proud said.

For a number of years, there has been conjecture about the possibility of a Nine Mile III.

“I pose the question, would any corporation want to come to Oswego County to build Nine Mile III when they can’t trust the word of the people who negotiate the contract with them?” Proud asked. “I maintain that they probably would look somewhere else. We need to establish the reputation of standing up for what we’ve signed.”

Public Hearing Set On County Nuke Deal

The Nine Mile Point nuclear station, with Nine Mile 1 on the left and Nine Mile 2 and its signature cooling tower on the right. Photo © Constellation Energy Group, Inc. 2008

The Nine Mile Point nuclear station, with Nine Mile 1 on the left and Nine Mile 2 and its signature cooling tower on the right. Photo © Constellation Energy Group, Inc. 2008

OSWEGO, NY – At its meeting Tuesday, the Oswego County Legislature’s Nuclear Plant Tax Status Committee approved two resolutions dealing with Nine Mile Point Unit I.

The first: Adopting County of Oswego Local Law Number 3 of 2010 “A Local Law Granting an Exemption from Taxation Provided for Under Real Property Tax Law §485 and §490 Regarding Nine Mile Point, Unit I, A Nuclear Powered Electric Generating Facility.”

The second: Authorizing the Chairman to Execute a Tax Agreement on Certain Terms with Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station, LLC Pursuant to Real Property Tax Law §485.

They also approved granting flexibility to allow the town of Scriba and the county to negotiate an agreement with Constellation (owner of Unit I) even if the Oswego City School District Board of Education continues to oppose the agreement.

The school district, the third party in the taxing arrangement, voted against the one-year PILOT deal last month.

Scriba’s town board unanimously passed the tentative agreement about a week before that.

A public hearing regarding the tentative agreement will be held at 7 p.m. Thursday, prior to the Oswego County Legislature’s regular meeting.

Prior to Tuesday’s vote, Oswego County Administrator Phil Church described three possible scenarios the county could be facing.

One was all three entities approving (should the school district reverse itself) the deal and being treated equally; each receiving 275 percent more than what they currently get from Unit I.

This would also avoid the expense of tax litigation and possible court-ordered refunds, he pointed out.

The agreement would have the facility assessed at $600 million, up from the current $187 million.

“That places the county, the Oswego school district, the town of Scriba and the Mexico School District in good negotiation position going forward on negotiations with Nine Mile 1 for next year and the more valuable plants, Nine Mile II and FitzPatrick,” he told the committee.

The second scenario considers that all three entities voted against the PILOT.

That would place the facility back on the tax rolls at $600 million.

However, Church pointed out, Constellation has filed a grievance claiming Unit I’s value is $19 million.

”So, we would end up in a tax certiorari proceeding,” Church said; all the while negotiations continued between all of the parties.

Oswego County Attorney Dick Mitchell wouldn’t put a price tag on the litigations.

But, he said, the cost would be “considerable” and could go on for “several years.”

The refunds by law are entitled to a rate of interest set by law; it’s much higher than what market interest is, he informed the committee.

“That’s an additional payment over and above the tax refund,” he said.

The town and county would temporarily receive the same amount of money as proposed in scenario one, according to Church, adding that the school district would temporarily see an increase.

All three entities might be forced to pay for the certiorari proceedings, Church said, adding if the court rules in favor of Constellation, they would have to return a portion of the money.

Of the three, the school district would likely bear the largest portion of the litigation and refund expenses, he said.

This would also place everyone in a poor negotiating position, he added.

The third scenario is the current situation with the school district as the lone opposition.

If things play out that way, Scriba and the county would receive the same as with the first scenario. They have the authority to enter into an agreement with Constellation on their own, Church noted.

“So what we’re talking about is a scenario where the plant is tax exempt for town and county but still taxable for the school district,” Church explained.

The school district would receive “the same or less,” Church said.

Also, the state could assign its own value to the plant and skew the equalization rates so that the district and parts of the county may not receive tax cuts they expected, he warned.

“In each scenario, if played out logically here, there is very little chance that the school district can end up with more money than they seem to feel they are going to have,” he added.

The best thing, for all parties involved, he said, would be accepting the deal.

Kevin Caraccioli, town of Scriba’s attorney, told the committee, “We’re still prepared to work and convince the school district that scenario one is the most beneficial scenario that we can all join; it’s the most benefit to the entire community. We’re prepared to work with the county and the school district to come up with the best plan.”

School District To Hold Two Public Hearings

OSWEGO, NY – The Oswego City School District Board of Education will conduct two public hearings tonight (May 18)  at the Education Center Board Rooms.

The regular meeting will be called to order at 5 p.m. with the board members adjourning to executive session to discuss negotiations and possible litigation.

One hour later the board will return to the Board Room in the terrace level of the Education Center for two public hearings.

Both public hearings will focus on the status of Nine Mile Point Unit 1.

At 6 p.m. the first public hearing will be to consider the issue of exempting the nuclear powered electric generating facility from taxation, special ad valorem levies and special assessments.

Immediately following will be a second public hearing, tentatively scheduled for 6:15 p.m., which will address the consideration of a tax agreement with the owner of Nine Mile Point Unit 1.

At the conclusion of the public hearings the board will convene for its regular meeting.

Students will be recognized for their success in science endeavors and the county-wide “Battle of the Books.”

The board will then turn to regular business to address resolutions relating to the board of education, personnel and finance.

Public Hearings Set on Tentative Tax Pact

OSWEGO, NY – The residents of the Oswego City School District and town of Scriba will have the opportunity to comment on the tentative tax agreement between local school – government officials and the Nine Mile Point I nuclear facility.

Late Tuesday night, the school board voted to hold a couple public hearings on the situation. At a brief meeting Wednesday evening, Scriba scheduled its public hearing.

The school district’s hearing will be May 18, the town’s May 19.

The county will also schedule a public hearing.

The agreement, for one year only, nearly triples the amount paid by the facility. Details made public Tuesday afternoon by Oswego County and the town of Scriba show that the nuclear plant will pay $11 million in taxes this year, up from $4 million.

“Certainly, to jump from $4 million to $11 million is a significant jump,” Kevin C. Caraccioli, the town’s attorney, said Wednesday. “We’re just looking for them to pay their fair share and this is a good start in that direction.”

Tuesday night, after a lengthy executive session, the Oswego school board returned to public session and voted on the following resolution to conduct a pair of public hearings on May 18.

WHEREAS, Sections 485 and 490 of the Real Property Tax Law of the State of New York, allows the School District to exempt nuclear powered electric generating facilities located within the district from taxation, special ad valorem levies and special assessments and to enter into Tax Agreements with the owners of said facilities; and

WHEREAS, the Board of Education wishes to consider adoption of a resolution which would grant, as permitted by Real Property Tax Law Section 485 and Section 490, an exemption to a nuclear powered electric generating facility located within the district from taxation, special ad valorem levies, and special assessments, specifically Nine Mile Point Unit No. 1 Nuclear Generating Station (tax parcels 079.00-02-03 and 079.00-02-03.01) (hereinafter Nine Mile Point Unit No. 1); and

WHEREAS, the Board of Education also wishes to review a proposed Tax Agreement for the 2010-2011 fiscal year only.

NOW, THEREFORE, upon presentation and recommendation of William W. Crist, Superintendent of Schools, motion made by Francis Hoefer and seconded by Thomas DeCastro

1)  That the Board of Education shall hold a public hearing on the issue of exempting the nuclear powered electric generating facility Nine Mile Point Unit No. 1 located within the District from taxation, special ad valorem levies and special assessments, as authorized and provided for by Real Property Tax Law, Section 485 and Section 490; said public hearing to be held the 18th day of May, 2010 at 6 p.m., at the Education Center, 120 E. First St., Oswego, New York.

2)  That a public hearing shall also be held to consider a Tax Agreement with the owner of the nuclear powered electric generating facility located in the Town of Scriba, and commonly known as Nine Mile Point Unit 1, said public hearing to also be held on the 18th day of May, 2010 at the Education Center at 6:15 p.m.

3)  That the Clerk is hereby directed to publish notice of said public hearing and to post said notice as required by law.

ADOPTED: 5-1-1
(John Dunsmoor voted “No”; Dave White was not present)

Meeting Set On Tentative Tax Agreement

OSWEGO, NY – A tentative tax agreement is reportedly in place between local school – government officials and the Nine Mile Point I nuclear facility.

It nearly triples the amount paid by the facility. Details made public  Tuesday afternoon by Oswego County and the town of Scriba show that the nuclear plant will pay $11 million in taxes this year, up from $4 million.

The agreement is for one year only.

The Scriba Town Board has scheduled a special meeting for 6 p.m. Wednesday in the Municipal Building to discuss the matter.  The details of the agreement were discussed Monday night at a special meeting in Scriba among the town, county, and Oswego City School District.

“This tentative agreement allows the parties to move forward productively with discussions during the coming year, while at the same time providing the tax jurisdictions with additional revenues to assist them in providing essential services to the public,” said Sam Belcher, a vice president at Nine Mile I, in a news release announcing the deal.

In 2001, the county enacted a local law granted nuclear power electric generating facilities in Oswego County exemptions from taxation, special ad valorem levies and special assignments until 2016.

Earlier this spring, the legislature terminated that law.

The amendment passed by the legislators changes the local law’s exemptions so that they expire with the current tax agreement, rather than 2016, explained Legislator Jack Proud.

“This changes that window from 2016 to 2010. It preserves (the taxing jurisdictions’) option of placing the facilities back on the tax rolls if we so deem it necessary, if a new fair tax agreement can’t be reached.”

Negotiations were being held to see whether the power plants would receive a new PILOT (Payment In Lieu Of Taxes) agreement or be returned to the county tax rolls.

Wednesday’s meeting should be rather quick, according to Kevin C. Caraccioli, the town’s attorney.

The purpose of the meeting is to establish a date for a public hearing, likely May 19, he said.

“Any tax agreement is subject to a public hearing. And we have to give enough notice prior to the hearing,” he explained.

Then, the three boards (Scriba, county and Oswego City School District) will each vote on the proposal.

The final agreement must be in place before July; that is when the final assessment rolls are announced.

“This is a one-year deal, with Unit I, that allows for continued negotiations,” Caraccioli, said. “We are looking for a more long-term, comprehensive agreement. This deal would nearly triple Unit I’s payments from a base of about $4 million to about $11 million.”

The PILOT for Unit I expires this year; Unit II expires in 2011.

There is some interest in exploring the possibility of negotiating a comprehensive agreement that includes both units.  Discussions continue with the owners of the FitzPatrick nuclear plant, Entergy, but no deal has been reached.

County Amends Law Regarding Nuclear Tax Pact

OSWEGO, NY – At a special meeting of the Oswego County Legislature on Thursday evening, lawmakers amended Local Law No. 4 of 2001.

In 2001, the local law granted nuclear power electric generating facilities in Oswego County exemptions from taxation, special ad valorem levies and special assignments until 2016, according to Phil Church, county administrator.

“The amendment changes those exemptions so that they expire with the current tax agreement, rather than 2016,” Legislator Jack Proud explained. “This changes the window from 2016 to 2010. It preserves (the taxing jurisdictions’) option of placing the facilities back on the tax rolls if we so deem it necessary, if a new fair tax agreement can’t be reached.”

The resolution passed 20-0-2. Legislators Mike Kunzwiler and Jim Oldenburg, employees of the plants, abstained.

Three legislators, Margaret Kastler, Milferd Potter and Shawn Doyle were absent. Doyle was attending a meeting in Henderson regarding the wind farms; and as an employee at Nine Mile, he would also have abstained from voting.

The county, as well as the town of Scriba and the Oswego City School District, are negotiating with Entergy and Constellation regarding the tax status of the nuclear power plants.

The county now has the option of agreeing on a new Payment In Lieu Of Taxes pact, or placing the plants back on the tax rolls.

Legislators had also considered passing two resolutions, one in support of Fort Ontario and the other supporting Selkirk Shores.

However, according to Barry Leemann, chair of the legislature, they were unable to do so.

Thursday was a special meeting, called to deal with the local law issue. Under the rules of the legislature, he explained, only what’s on the agenda for a special meeting can be acted on.

The county will vote on the resolutions at its March meeting, he said.

County Sets Public Hearings On Nuke Tax Plan, Raises

OSWEGO, NY – The Oswego County Legislature approved amending Local Law No. 4 of 2001.

Legislators also set a public hearing on the proposed changed.

The county, as well as the town of Scriba and the Oswego City School District, are negotiating with Entergy and Constellation regarding the tax status of the nuclear power plants.

In 2001, the local law granted nuclear power electric generating facilities in Oswego County exemptions from taxation, special ad valorem levies and special assignments until 2016, according to Phil Church, county administrator.

“The amendment would change those exemptions so that they would expire with the current tax agreement, rather than 2016,” Legislator Jack Proud said as he offered the resolution for consideration by the legislature. “This will change that window from 2016 to 2010. It preserves (the taxing jurisdictions’) option of placing the facilities back on the tax rolls if we so deem it necessary, if a new fair tax agreement can’t be reached.”

The town of Scriba and the Mexico School District also adopted exemptions in 2001 and are taking similar actions this month to expire those exemptions with the current tax agreement, Church added.

The resolution was approved unanimously with the legislators employed by those corporations abstaining from the vote.

The public hearing will be Feb. 25 at 7 p.m. in the Legislative Chambers.

Hearing Planned On Raises

The county will conduct a public hearing at 2 p.m. March 11 in the Legislative Chambers regarding salary increases for three officials.

The raises would hike the pay of the county clerk, treasurer and sheriff.

The salary for the clerk and treasurer would increase three percent (73,995 to $76,215).

The increase for the sheriff would be four percent ($81,284 to $84,536).

The salary adjustments, if approved, would be retroactive to Jan. 1.

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