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Be Alert for Aluminum Flares on Lake Ontario Shoreline

Anyone who finds an 18 ½-inch aluminum cylinder along the Lake Ontario shore should leave it alone and call 911. Oswego County Fire Coordinator Donald Forbes said the cylinders are unspent military flares and can be extremely combustible. The flares are sometimes used by the Canadian Navy and can float for long distances if they are not activated.

Anyone who finds an 18 ½-inch aluminum cylinder along the Lake Ontario shore should leave it alone and call 911. Oswego County Fire Coordinator Donald Forbes said the cylinders are unspent military flares and can be extremely combustible. The flares are sometimes used by the Canadian Navy and can float for long distances if they are not activated.

OSWEGO – Oswego County Fire Coordinator Donald Forbes reminds people who walk along the Lake Ontario beaches to be alert for military signal flares, contained in an 18 ½-inch aluminum cylinder, that sometimes wash up on the shoreline and wetland areas.

Anyone who finds an 18 ½-inch aluminum cylinder along the Lake Ontario shore should leave it alone and call 911. Oswego County Fire Coordinator Donald Forbes said the cylinders are unspent military flares and can be extremely combustible. The flares are sometimes used by the Canadian Navy and can float for long distances if they are not activated.
Anyone who finds an 18 ½-inch aluminum cylinder along the Lake Ontario shore should leave it alone and call 911. Oswego County Fire Coordinator Donald Forbes said the cylinders are unspent military flares and can be extremely combustible. The flares are sometimes used by the Canadian Navy and can float for long distances if they are not activated.

“Spent and live Canadian signal flares that wash up on the shore of Lake Ontario and the associated wetlands are a dangerous material,” said Forbes. “They have labels warning people to notify the military or police. The flares should be left in place until a knowledgeable, qualified individual can examine and remove the device.”

The flares are used by the Canadian Navy during training exercises and may be combustible.

Although not an everyday occurrence, if the flares are not completely activated they will continue to float and may wash up on shore.

Anyone who finds one should leave it alone and call 911.

Untrained persons should not handle the flares.

The flares are aluminum-colored, 18 ½-inches long and three inches in diameter.

They contain a warning label in English and French that states: “Hazardous Material WARNING Contact Police or Military.”