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Child Advocacy Center Welcomes Jennifer Glowacki

Submitted Article

FULTON, NY – Executive Director of the Child Advocacy Center of Oswego County has announced that Jennifer Glowacki, MS has recently joined the staff as a mental health counselor.

Jennifer Glowacki has joined the staff of the Child Advocacy Center of Oswego County as a mental health counselor.  Located at 370 S. Fourth St., Fulton, the CAC is a non-profit charitable organization that provides a range of services to children who have been physically or sexually abused.
Jennifer Glowacki has joined the staff of the Child Advocacy Center of Oswego County as a mental health counselor. Located at 370 S. Fourth St., Fulton, the CAC is a non-profit charitable organization that provides a range of services to children who have been physically or sexually abused.

A native of Auburn, Glowacki received her degree in psychology from LeMoyne College in Syracuse, and her Masters in Mental Health Counseling from SUNY Oswego.

She had previously served as an intern at the CAC and is pleased to be part of the team at the CAC.

“I really enjoy working with children.  I feel a connection to them. It is very rewarding to see how much you help them and how important you can be to them,” said Glowacki.

Located at 370 S. Fourth St., the CAC of Oswego County is a non-profit charitable organization that provides a range of services to children who have been physically or sexually abused.

Working together with law enforcement investigators, child protective services, medical providers, therapeutic professionals, victim support professionals, and the district attorney’s office, the CAC looks to maintain a well-coordinated, effective approach to child abuse investigation and prosecution, and service provision to families and individuals affected by child abuse.

While Glowacki enjoys what she does, admittedly it can be a challenge at times.

“Sometimes the children, especially the adolescents, do not want to open up. They feel they are in trouble. I have to change their perspective and let them know that we are here to help them and make them feel better about themselves,” explained Glowacki.

To help the children recover and work through their problems Glowacki utilizes a number of effective techniques including expressive arts intervention, and observing their play habits.

“How they express themselves when they draw and how they interact with their toys can tell you a lot about them,” she explained.

According to Glowacki, education is also an important part of the work she does with the children.

“Many children do not know their boundaries and what the difference is between a safe touch and an unsafe touch. It can be confusing to them and when it happens they don’t realize that it is wrong. The education part of what we do here is very important.  We teach them the right and wrong, what to do and who to tell if they feel unsafe. Many children do not get this education at home as parents don’t always feel comfortable discussing sexual issues with them. We supplement that part which they may not be getting at home,” said Glowacki.

“If I can make a difference in their life and make them feel safe again and be able to express themselves and learn what they need to know to deal with their issues and function successfully as adults then I have achieved my goals,” she added.

Established in 2001, the CAC is a safe, child-friendly site for the investigation, prosecution and treatment of child abuse.

For more information on the CAC, call 592-4453.