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CiTi students learn about behavioral adaptions

Students in Robyn Yorker’s Stepping Stones Day Program class recently participated in a project designed to teach both physical and behavioral adaptions.

Nick Schneider and Leland Bradberry hold a display of a small brown bat and a large brown bat, proving there is nothing to fear.
Nick Schneider and Leland Bradberry hold a display of a small brown bat and a large brown bat, proving there is nothing to fear.

The students were learning about brown bats, flying mammals popular throughout Central New York.

Yorker said studying bats is a fun way for students to absorb valuable lessons. Through the study of bats, students learned physical and behavioral adaptions, habitats, foods eaten by animals, echolocation, pollination and hibernation.

Students also learned some of the superstition that surrounds the flying critter.

Al LaFrance, a specialist in bat colony removal, was a special guest host for the students and offered insight into the world of bats.

LaFrance said the way bats are depicted in television and in movies couldn’t be further from the truth, noting that a bat would never bite a human.

Overall, Yorker said she was extremely proud of everything her class had learned on the subject.

“I was thrilled that they were so interested and retained so much information from the unit,” Yorker said. “My students showed a great deal of understanding in their written and oral presentations on the specific bats they studied.”