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September 19, 2018

Food for thought: Agricultural Literacy Week in spotlight at Maroun Elementary


Second graders at Michael A. Maroun Elementary School learned about fruits, vegetables and farming during Agricultural Literacy Week on Tuesday.

Michael A. Maroun second graders Matthew Froio and Brycen LaRobardiere (from left) snack on baby carrots while they learn about vegetables Tuesday as part of Agricultural Literacy Week.

Michael A. Maroun second graders Matthew Froio and Brycen LaRobardiere (from left) snack on baby carrots while they learn about vegetables Tuesday as part of Agricultural Literacy Week.

Jan Smith, of Cornell Cooperative Extension, offered the students some food for thought as she read “Who Grew My Soup.”

The story highlights a boy’s journey to meet every single farmer who grew the vegetables used in his mom’s homemade soup.

Along the way, the boy learns how vegetables are grown and he is no longer hesitant to indulge in the homemade soup.

In addition to the story, students snacked on baby carrots and participated in an activity where they created their own soup using paper cutouts of vegetables and other farm-fresh ingredients.

“Even if you don’t like soup there are plenty of other ways to get your vegetables,” Smith told the students as she stressed the importance of following the nutrition guidelines outlined in MyPlate – the mechanism that replaced the traditional food pyramid in 2011.

Kaylen Lamphere, a second grader at Michael A. Maroun Elementary School, adds ingredients to the soup she and her classmates created during an activity held during Agricultural Literacy week.

Kaylen Lamphere, a second grader at Michael A. Maroun Elementary School, adds ingredients to the soup she and her classmates created during an activity held during Agricultural Literacy week.

For teacher Patty Lazarz, Agriculture Literacy Week always provides students with a different educational experience.

“(Smith) has come to talk to us about maple syrup production, honey, chickens and gardening,” Lazarz said. “It usually has something to do with nature and the students learn a lot.”

All lessons, activities and extensions are aligned to New York State and Common Core Learning Standards.

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