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Fulton Based Contractor to Continue Work on Former Nestles Site

The condition of the section of the former Nestles site designated to Aldi supermarket, on the corner of Fay and S. Fourth Streets as of May 8, 2017.

The condition of the section of the former Nestles site designated to Aldi supermarket, on the corner of Fay and S. Fourth Streets as of May 8, 2017.

FULTON, NY – City officials accepted a bid from Rowlee Construction, Inc. yesterday (May 18) at a special meeting of the Common Council relative to the remaining asbestos and demolition removal at the former Nestles site.

Specifically, the Fulton based construction company will remove the debris left on the 2.2 acre parcel of the former Nestles site located at 555 S. Fourth St. that is designated for supermarket chain, Aldi.

The current condition of the 2.2 acre parcel of the former Nestles site designated for Aldi on the corner of Fay and South Fourth streets.
The current condition of the 2.2 acre parcel of the former Nestles site designated for Aldi on the corner of Fay and South Fourth streets.

The city began requesting bids after the former contractor, Infinity Enterprises, backed out of their commitment to demolish the site in its entirety earlier this month.

Before pulling out of the contract due to financial losses, 75% of the buildings on the 24 acre site had been demolished including all buildings on the blueprint for Aldi at the corner of Fay and South Fourth streets.

Infinity had agreed to demolish the site at no cost to the city but with rights to all salvageable material on site in October of 2015, nearly two years later the contract was abandoned due to substantial financial losses incurring from a $10,000 weekly payroll and a low scrap price, according to Fulton Mayor, Ronald Woodward Sr.

The new contract with Rowlee Construction is not to exceed a price of $100,000 without additional authorization from the Common Council. As soon as all channels are approved through the Department of Labor, Rowlee expressed an immediate readiness to begin the project.

Estimated to be at least a two week job according to Mayor Woodward, Rowlee will receive a daily rate of $4,627.50, including the use of a bulldozer to make work quicker. Additionally, ten wheel trucks will charge $103.50 per hour and 18-wheel trucks will charge $138 per hour.

Some members of the public, including Oswego County Legislator Frank Castigila Jr., D-Fulton, expressed worry specifically to the use of a minimum amount of trucks daily, asking to add language of this nature to the contract.

Woodward noted that Rowlee had made notion to the use of three trucks, however, the disruption in work would not come from amount of trucks but instead from delay at the land fill, Woodward said.

City officials will meet with county officials today to determine whether the project can gain priority at the land fill to lessen any delay they may encounter or to alleviate the price of tipping fees of which the city is financially responsible for.

Despite city officials reaching out to several contractors, only three bids were received by deadline.

The two other bids came in from a Phoenix based contractor bidding a flat price of $333,000 and a Hannibal based contractor bidding a daily rate of $9,250 with trucking fees at $100 per hour and $135 per hour.

“I’m going to encourage the council to do this, I’m not going to let that sit. I’ve had enough of that nonsense up there. I am not going to let anyone take advantage of the city of Fulton, it’s not going to happen,” he said.

Woodward said the city intends to pay for the contract out of the $700,000 the city recently bonded for in March for the use on demolition of city owned properties.

To complete the contract with Aldi, Woodward added that the city is working with National Contracting, a contractor that works for Aldi nationwide, to complete the prep work on site including bringing the site to grade by raising it three feet. This work would be paid for off the sale price for Aldi which currently stands at $350,000.

The city has already purchased crushed brick from the site to be used for the parking area of the Aldi site and has gravel on site to be used under the building to bring to grade.

In accordance with the Aldi contract, the city will have 90 days after closing to demolish the building that lines State Route 481 as to provide clear visibility of the store.

This, and the remaining demolition on the entire site, will be bid separately at that time.

“I’ll tell you what, now you’re going find out what it actually cost to do this stuff,” Mayor Woodward said, explaining that the city was fortunate to be able to remove the majority of the site for free.

Only one building on the 24-acre site may remain standing as Mayor Woodward deems it can be usable with some renovations.

The building, near Burt Street, was once the “bean room” of the Nestles factory, Woodward said.

“That building is in pretty good shape and it doesn’t take up a lot of the property. I thought it would be nice if we could put a little bit of money in it to fix it up and make some type of museum with that Nestles stuff, so that people don’t forget what was there,” he said.

For now, the continued focus will remain on the intended Aldi site. A representative from Aldi confirmed after the former contractor backed out that the Fulton store will prevail, though a time line for construction was not readily available.

However, Tully Division Vice President, Aaron Sumida noted that Aldi was intending on a late fall grand opening.

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16 Comments

  1. Its great to have a paid contractor finishing the job. If I am reading this right part of the financing will be by a preapproved bond from the C.C. .That bond was for other items, how can that be used for the Aldi’s site. Also I am concerned about financing the demolition of the remaining buildings . Aldi gives us 90 days but the C.C. still has to come up with rhe funding. Anyway lets hope for the best.

  2. Hi, Paul. To answer your question, the $700,000 bonded by the Common Council in March was for the demolition of city owned properties, this is not specific to houses but any property the city owns such as the former Nestles site.

  3. Thankyou Mayor Woodward for a very positive actions. Moving forward with the project is what everyone’s wants. Thankyou,

  4. just a thought,maybe build a high class r.v. park for all of us glampers ,looks like a place or two i saw during a tour in the marines,good luck.

  5. Thanks to the mayor and Rowlee Const.The work will finally get done now and us on the Eastside have a place to to go get a few food items.Been way to long playing silly games with that other const Co.

  6. Isn’t it odd that the Department of Labor approval was needed for a city to clear land that it owned?
    As can be seen from this debacle, government doesn’t do many things very well.

  7. The city should have gone with the paid contractor from the start. Rowlee Construction is an excellent company. Fulton city government thought they were getting a bargain with Infinity. You get what you pay for… Nothing is ever free in life. It truly makes me wonder if we have adults running the city.

  8. “I’m going to encourage the council to do this, I’m not going to let that sit. I’ve had enough of that nonsense up there. I am not going to let anyone take advantage of the city of Fulton, it’s not going to happen,” he said.
    Pay no attention to the Fire Department, Police Department contracts or the D.P.W. budget and the condition of our roads. The end of his term can’t come soon enough.

  9. Words are always very nice to hear and read. Actions speak louder that words. “I’m not going to let anyone take advantage of the City” It has happened twice at the Nestle site. I truly don’t think Rowlee construction will take advantage of the city. The point is that closing the barn door after the horse has gotten out twice is rather lame. One has to ask how much and how many more times will this happen before the taxpayers say “enough is enough”.

  10. what is going on here,sat.morning and we are paying the crews to do lawn maint.really guys,why dont we fix the AMERICAN FLAGS,in the city that are flying at every angle but correct,i love my country,not my city,caint wait to be gone or rid of this pollitical b.s.happing here

  11. A reputable company should have been hired to do the demolishing in the first place. It’s about time someone made a intelligent decision for this poor city. Just goes to prove you get what you pay for.

  12. How about part of the property going to the Fulton Kiwanis Little league program (South east Corner)

  13. Not there…and have no proof…But sounds to me like original contractor went in…scrapped everything of value…then said…OK I’m out of here…Leaving nothing of value…….was there anyone watching the material taken out. And where it was taken to.

  14. John C , No one will admit it but you more than likely hit the nail on the head. He claims to have lost hundreds of thousands of dollars. Very doubtful..City again with it’s head up it’s you know what. Then they say they won’t let anyone take advantage of the city. Fools running a ship of Fools…keep electing them…

  15. That demo wasn’t FREE. The city paid for the equipment, then paid the contractor $300k for the crushed brick. The contractor scrapped everything they could, got paid the $300k then bolted. They weren’t even paying prevailing wage rates so their payroll was minimal. What a joke. Not to mention how they handled the asbestos.
    Then they give it to Rowlee with an open ended agreement. Fulton can’t afford to line peoples pockets.
    Looks like Castiglia continues to be either the only one with a brain or the only one not being paid off.

  16. So why is the City allowing a contractor that left us a mess to clean up to store his equipment on city property. Maybe we’re charging him rent. Just another way someone is getting something for nothing. Maybe the city is on the hook for the trucks that are still stored there. That wouldn’t surprise me either.

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