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Fulton Library Hosts Blizzard of ’66 Program

Fultonian Virginia Messerschmidt, standing next to a Walter snowplow. The photo was taken in the days immediately following The Blizzard of ’66. The snowplow was on loan to Central New York from downstate New York and helped in the tremendous effort to clean up after the storm.

Fultonian Virginia Messerschmidt, standing next to a Walter snowplow. The photo was taken in the days immediately following The Blizzard of ’66. The snowplow was on loan to Central New York from downstate New York and helped in the tremendous effort to clean up after the storm.

FULTON, NY – When The Blizzard of ’66 barreled into Central New York, the city of Oswego got a lot of news coverage from the storm, with its 102-inch snowfall total as recorded by SUNY Oswego meteorology professor and WSGO weatherman Bob Sykes.

" data-medium-file="https://oswegocountytoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/fulton-1966-storm-Virginia.M.one_-300x216.jpg" data-large-file="https://oswegocountytoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/fulton-1966-storm-Virginia.M.one_-460x331.jpg" class="size-medium wp-image-180387" src="http://oswegocountytoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/fulton-1966-storm-Virginia.M.one_-300x216.jpg" alt="Fultonian Virginia Messerschmidt, standing next to a Walter snowplow. The photo was taken in the days immediately following The Blizzard of ’66. The snowplow was on loan to Central New York from downstate New York and helped in the tremendous effort to clean up after the storm." width="300" height="216" srcset="https://oswegocountytoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/fulton-1966-storm-Virginia.M.one_-300x216.jpg 300w, https://oswegocountytoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/fulton-1966-storm-Virginia.M.one_-150x108.jpg 150w, https://oswegocountytoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/fulton-1966-storm-Virginia.M.one_-460x331.jpg 460w, https://oswegocountytoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/fulton-1966-storm-Virginia.M.one_.jpg 1500w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" />
Fultonian Virginia Messerschmidt, standing next to a Walter snowplow. The photo was taken in the days immediately following The Blizzard of ’66. The snowplow was on loan to Central New York from downstate New York and helped in the tremendous effort to clean up after the storm.

But right down the road from the Port City, Fulton got more than its share of snow, too.

But nobody knows exactly how many inches fell in that city.

“The blinding snow and powerful winds were so severe during the blizzard that the person manning the weather observation station couldn’t even get to the site to do his daily measurements,” said Jim Farfaglia, author of a new book about the infamous weather event, Voices in the Storm: Stories from The Blizzard of ’66. “Though there are no exact figures from the four-day storm, I talked to plenty of people who were living in Fulton that assured me that their city’s snowfall was as monumental as Oswego’s.”

On November 18 at 6 p.m., the Fulton Public Library will host Farfaglia, who will share this and many other stories he collected from the more than  200 people he interviewed for his book on the blizzard and its companion volume, In Pursuit of Clouds: The Journey of Oswego’s Weatherman Bob Sykes.

“I remember hearing Bob Sykes countless times during the blizzard and wanted to include his story in my book. After interviewing his children, I realized that Bob had an amazing life as a weatherman beyond the ’66 storm, including serving his country during World War II as a meteorologist stationed in Greenland and his tenure teaching at SUNY Oswego, where he influenced many of today’s meteorologists such as Dave Eichorn, Al Roker and the Weather Channel’s Tom Niziol,” Farfaglia said.

At the library event, Farfaglia will also be debuting a PowerPoint presentation about The Blizzard and Sykes, which features photographs and weather graphics loaned to him from those he interviewed.

According to Betty Mauté, library director, “whether you remember the blizzard or just want to learn what it was to experience this storm, you won’t want to miss this event!”

The presentation will be available for local groups and organizations.

For more information about the event, contact the Fulton Library by calling (315) 592-5159.

For information about Farfaglia’s books and presentations, visit his website at www.jimfarfaglia.com