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Fulton Sixth Graders Study Rocket Science

Sixth grade teacher John Mercer and his students watch a rocket soar into the air as part of a culminating activity covering Newton’s Laws of Motion.

Sixth grade teacher John Mercer and his students watch a rocket soar into the air as part of a culminating activity covering Newton’s Laws of Motion.

FULTON – Fairgrieve Elementary School students became NASA engineers as they launched hand-crafted rockets during a recent lesson.

Sixth grader Angel Goodman is all smiles as she successfully launches the rocket she made during a recent lesson.
Sixth grader Angel Goodman is all smiles as she successfully launches the rocket she made during a recent lesson.

Sixth graders studied Newton’s Laws of Motion then took their learning to new heights with a hands-on learning experience inspired by the famed physicist.

The three sixth grade classes collaborated on the lesson using kits to assemble the rockets and prepare them for liftoff.

With ideal weather conditions recently, the students prepared for the launch.

Sixth grade teacher John Mercer and his students watch a rocket soar into the air as part of a culminating activity covering Newton’s Laws of Motion.
Sixth grade teacher John Mercer and his students watch a rocket soar into the air as part of a culminating activity covering Newton’s Laws of Motion.

One-by-one, each student placed their rocket on the launch pad and counted down from five, clapping and cheering with excitement as the rocket was propelled into the air.

“This was so much fun,” said sixth grader Kayla McCraith. “We learned about Newton’s Laws and how rockets work. We weren’t only learning; we were having fun at the same time.”

In addition to the project-based learning activity outdoors, students spent time in the classroom researching historic space shuttles and wrote research summaries about the Laws of Motion.

Fairgrieve students react to a successful rocket launch to cap off a science lesson.
Fairgrieve students react to a successful rocket launch to cap off a science lesson.