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September 21, 2018

Getting Back To Normal


“Things are pretty much back to normal where I am, aside from the fact that the trains aren’t running!” Joceyln Cook said. “Last night, I decided to trek downtown to check in on a friend who is in the area of Lower Manhattan without power and had to figure out the bus system.”

A downed tree in Morningside Park, which is a few blocks over from Joceyln Cook's apartment. "Aside from a few other downed trees and some signs and awnings ripped off buildings, my area came out of Superstorm Sandy relatively unscathed," she said.

A downed tree in Morningside Park, which is a few blocks over from Joceyln Cook’s apartment. “Aside from a few other downed trees and some signs and awnings ripped off buildings, my area came out of Superstorm Sandy relatively unscathed,” she said.

“Seeing a whole section of the city mostly without power, joining in with people wandering around with flashlights, and witnessing cars slowly negotiating their way through intersections without working traffic lights, was insane!” the former OCT contributing writer added.

She said her friend was fine, just bored sitting around without electricity or much information about what was going on.

She is making her way up Wednesday to stay in Cook’s apartment until her dorm has power again, which they are saying could be days, Cook noted.

“They did announce today though that some of the trains might be running again as soon as tomorrow!” she said.

Things have also calmed down a bit for former Hannibal resident John Campbell.

Rainbows over John Campbell's house in Magnolia, Delaware.

Rainbows over John Campbell’s house in Magnolia, Delaware.

He shares this photo of a double rainbow in the aftermath of Sandy.

“It was taken over my house in Magnolia, Delaware. I went outside when the eye of the storm went by. It was just over the bay and then right over my house. Went down near the water to see how bad it was. They didn’t let anyone get too close,” he said.

“The rain was pretty hard – it stung my face. The wind was pretty strong; you had to lean into at times when you walked. Once in a while a big gust would shove you back a step or two. It was kind of like walking in Oswego during the winter in a snowstorm,” he added.

He’s heard from some friends in Southwest Oswego who said they had some damage; tree limbs down, shingles blown off and stuff, he said.

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