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September 23, 2018

Heritage Foundation Applauds Those Who Preserve History


OSWEGO, NY – The Heritage Foundation of Oswego County recently recognized the efforts of county residents on a dozen projects.

The foundation is a non-profit group dedicated to the preservation and promotion of the county’s historic, architectural and environmental resources, according to Justin White, the night’s MC.

More than three dozen people filled the community room at the Oswego Public Library for the awards ceremony.

James Livingston was cited for preservation of his 19th century Italianate style residence at 212 E. Seventh St., Oswego.

James Livingston was cited for preservation of his 19th century Italianate style residence at 212 E. Seventh St., Oswego.

The first award was presented to Trinity Episcopal Church, 1492 Route 49, Constantia for the exterior restoration and overall preservation of an early 19th century Gothic style church.

The church is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

James Livingston was cited for preservation of exterior architectural elements through repair and paint of his 19th century Italianate style residence at 212 E. Seventh St., Oswego.

“It’s been my passion for five years,” Livingston said. “If you ever see me out and want to come in and just snoop around, suit yourself, it’s not a problem. The door’s always open.”

Mary Winslow Stephano, 89 E. Mohawk St., Oswego, was recognized for the repair and restoration of the side porch of her 19th century Italianate style residence.

Recognition was also given for repairs to wood siding, shutters and paint job of exterior.

David and Deb Deeb were honored for the preservation of exterior through repair and paint of their 19th century Queen Anne style resident located in Washington Square Historic District, 113 E. Third St., Oswego.

“The project preserved the unique mixture of wood clapboards, shingle siding, decorative windows, ornate trim and front porch,” according to White.

The home is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Sharon Manning, 62 E. Utica St., was cited for preservation of ornate cornice and trim through repair and paint of the 19th century Italianate style residence.

The project preserved wood clapboards, window surrounds and the distinctive wrap around porch.

Tom Ciappa, Conlee Shannon and Mary Ciappa were honored for extensive restoration of exterior architectural elements through repair and paint of a 19th century brick business block (169 W. First St., Oswego).

Tom Ciappa, Conlee Shannon and Mary Ciappa were honored for extensive restoration of a 19th century brick business block (169 W. First St., Oswego).

Tom Ciappa, Conlee Shannon and Mary Ciappa were honored for extensive restoration of a 19th century brick business block (169 W. First St., Oswego).

Their project restored the original appearance of this historic building through the addition of traditional commercial architectural, including the upper story windows and hoods.

“At one time, it was one building, four stories,” Tom pointed out. “The fourth floor was removed (on the right) after a fire.”

Currently, they are trying to turn the upper two floors into loft apartments, he added.

James Tesoriero was cited for preservation of ornate exterior architectural elements through repair and paint of the neighboring 19th century brick business block located in the historic downtown district.

This project, 167 W. First St., Oswego, involved special attention to the stabilization of the elaborate cornice that surrounds the top of the building.

Chris Tombolillo and Pam Knox, 70 W. Bridge St., Oswego, were honored for extensive restoration of the ornate exterior architectural elements through repair and paint of this 19th century Queen Anne style residence located in the Franklin Square Historic District.

This project included special attention to the restoration of the front porch, entranceway and overall details including clapboard, shingles, chimneys and decorative signs.

It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The West Baptist Church at West Third and Mohawk streets in Oswego was recognized for complete restoration of the original 1867 pipe organ of this Romanesque style church.

“The congregation has shown tremendous dedication towards ongoing overall preservation of this historic church structure,” White added.

Sam Diak and Susan Patrick, 249 W. Fifth St., Oswego, were cited for extensive overall renovation and preservation of exterior architectural elements through repair and paint of a 19th century brick Italianate commercial block.

The project preserved the traditional elements of this style including the windows, hoods, cornice, trim and metal roof.

The village of Parish, 2398 E. Main St., was honored for extensive restructuring of the roofline of an early 20th century building to adapt to the climate conditions and maintain overall structural integrity.

This former community gym has been successfully readapted to serve as a town and village hall.

It demonstrates an excellent example of adaptive reuse that maintains and preserves the community’s architectural heritage, White pointed out.

Vince Lobdell, Healthway Home Products, 3420 Maple Ave., Pulaski, was recognized for major restoration of a former foundry building known as Ontario Iron Works.

It is an excellent example of adaptive reuse of a previously abandoned building now remodeled into a contemporary business.

Careful attention to detail preserved the historic and architectural appearance of this landmark.

The Volunteer Appreciation Award was presented to the Leadership Oswego County Class of 2010.

Recognition was given to this group for its dedication to promoting the county’s rich historic past by creating a fun and interesting way to educate and inspire the local youth by developing the ‘History of Oswego County’ board game.

The project was done in memory of the late Oswego historian Rosemary Nesbitt, explained class advisor Jeff Grimshaw.

“Each year, every class has to have a project. They started out with this idea, ‘we are going to do a board game.’ I said, ‘OK, have at it,’” he said. “It took a lot of time and energy from this group and I am very, very proud of them.”

“This project did start out as a vision,” agreed project coordinator Tim Yeager.

They had a debut event for the game and expected about 50 to 75 people. They wound up with more than 100, more than a dozen teams.

Mary Winslow Stephano, 89 E. Mohawk St., Oswego, was recognized for restoration of her 19th century Italianate style residence.

Mary Winslow Stephano, 89 E. Mohawk St., Oswego, was recognized for restoration of her 19th century Italianate style residence.

In the 1960s, when urban renewal led to the demolition of numerous historic business blocks in the city of Oswego, citizens recognized the need for an organization to advocate for the preservation of Oswego County’s rich and historic past, White explained.

Since that time, the foundation has sponsored programs that stress the importance of historic preservation.

Historic buildings create a sense of place and without a memory of the past, it is difficult to chart the future, White noted.

The foundation supports and sponsors projects that continue to educate individuals and communities on the importance of preservation.

Technical assistance support and educational programs on preservation projects and issues are available through the foundation.

The Heritage Foundation may be contacted at (PO Box 405) 143 W. Third St., Oswego.

For more information, call 342-3354 or visit www.oswegocountyheritage.org

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