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History Comes Alive At Fairley’s Ole Fashion Day

A decades-long tradition at Fairley Elementary School continued recently as fourth graders, decked out in period costumes, took a step back in time during Ole Fashion Day.

" data-medium-file="https://oswegocountytoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/dancing-300x200.jpg" data-large-file="https://oswegocountytoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/dancing-460x307.jpg" class="size-medium wp-image-211853" src="http://oswegocountytoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/dancing-300x200.jpg" alt="Students participate in square dancing during Ole Fashion Day." width="300" height="200" srcset="https://oswegocountytoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/dancing-300x200.jpg 300w, https://oswegocountytoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/dancing-150x100.jpg 150w, https://oswegocountytoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/dancing-460x307.jpg 460w, https://oswegocountytoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/dancing.jpg 864w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" />
Students participate in square dancing during Ole Fashion Day.

The annual event corresponds with the social studies unit on Colonial America, where students learn about patriots, loyalists and the Revolutionary War.

Classrooms were set up with different activities that helped define the Colonial era.

Students learned from a one-room school house, writing sentences on chalkboards and pretending to fetch firewood to keep the room heated.

Members of the Hannibal Historical Society joined Fairley students March 9 for Ole Fashion Day. From left, are fourth graders Tristen Van Norman and Kailey Cappelletti; Barbara Miano, of the historical society; and Morgan Coats.
Members of the Hannibal Historical Society joined Fairley students March 9 for Ole Fashion Day. From left, are fourth graders Tristen Van Norman and Kailey Cappelletti; Barbara Miano, of the historical society; and Morgan Coats.

“Ole Fashion Day is a celebration of what our students have been learning in English language arts, social studies and math,” said fourth grade teacher Carol Cook. “They learned about artisans in our ELA modules and the jobs that were common during that time.”

Fourth graders simulated those jobs while building a project in the carpentry-themed classroom.

Other activities included games, crafts, square dancing and a museum full of antiques.

“This is a great, authentic learning experience for the kids,” Cook said. “The authenticity of going back in time and acting out what they’ve been studying helps reinforce the concepts they learned in the classroom.”