;

Iroquois-themed projects in the spotlight at Fairley

The Fairley Elementary School cafeteria was transformed into an Iroquois village Wednesday night as fourth-grade students showcased homemade longhouses, recipe books, a lacrosse stick and other aspects of Native American culture.

As part of the curriculum, students studied Iroquois culture in the classroom and built upon that knowledge by watching a live performance from an expert on the subject.

Fairley Elementary fourth grader Jaager Carter proudly shows off the longhouse he created from tree bark and items he found in his home. He and his classmates showcased their knowledge of the Iroquois culture during a presentation Wednesday night in the school cafeteria.
Fairley Elementary fourth grader Jaager Carter proudly shows off the longhouse he created from tree bark and items he found in his home. He and his classmates showcased their knowledge of the Iroquois culture during a presentation Wednesday night in the school cafeteria.

However, learning was not confined to the school building, as students took their knowledge home and created a variety of projects, culminating with a presentation during this week’s board of education meeting.

“I think the live performance and demonstrations helped our kids connect to the Iroquois traditions and cultures,” Fairley Principal Jody Musa said. “That is evident through these projects.”

Students used everything from store-purchased goods to natural resources to items within their own homes to create their projects.

“The Iroquois did not use paint or cardboard because they did not have paint or cardboard,” fourth grader Maria Khan said as she presented her longhouse made of tree bark.

For Musa, the presentations were a great way to wrap up the Iroquois unit and shine a spotlight on the students, their parents and teachers as well.