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September 18, 2018

Local Author Pens Memoir Of Three Good Men


Submitted Article

OSWEGO, NY – For his first two books, Dr. Harold Nash, Ed.D., chose to write about the intricacies of the human brain.

Dr. Harold Nash displays copies of his newest release, Three Good Men.  The book is a fascinating look at three gentlemen who influenced his life as he describes in vivid detail his relationship with these men and how their words and actions impressed him and helped make him what he is today.

Dr. Harold Nash displays copies of his newest release, Three Good Men. The book is a fascinating look at three gentlemen who influenced his life as he describes in vivid detail his relationship with these men and how their words and actions impressed him and helped make him what he is today.

For his third book, the local author put his brain to work as he reminisced about three gentlemen who had a profound and positive impact on his life.  His memories provide us with a fascinating look at these gentlemen as he describes in vivid detail his relationship with these men and how their words and actions impressed him and helped make him what he is today.

Nash’s latest book, Three Good Men, recently published and released by Ontariolina Publishing, is as much a tribute to these men as it is an account of the writer’s realization of how significant they were in shaping his life.

“Recently I have had the time to think about a lot of things,” said Nash. “I began thinking about my past and what has brought me to this point. I reminisced about people I met along the way who have been helpful and influential. I identified three men who I thought were the most significant in my life; my father, Harold L. Nash; a former professor, Dr. Martin H. Rogers; and my friend and colleague, Professor John J. Readling. As the memories of them came rushing back to me I began writing them down. I soon realized that I did not know soon enough in my life the consequences of my time with each of them and had not thanked them for what they did generally and particularly for me. I found this to be disappointing.”

After much contemplation and a discussion with his wife, Lorraine, Nash decided to write Three Good Men.

“I wanted to spell out my understanding now of how influential these men were in my life and how what they did was helpful to me at the time and what the consequences of their help have been and continue to be,” said Nash.

To better explain and characterize these men Nash contacted a number of sources including their relatives, friends, and former employers, as well as various city and state records.

“I hope that the reader comes away with a clear picture of who these men were and how they influenced me. It may even inspire them to think back on their own lives and remember those special people who were important to them,” added Nash.

In the book, Nash explains how each of these men influenced him at significant points in his life, his father during his formative and young adult years; Professor Rogers during his college years; and Professor Readling during his professional years and his adult life.

His memories have struck a chord with several readers.

“Three Good Men was a joy to read. It makes you stop to think about all those people who helped shape your life,” said Deana Masuicca, director of the Oswego YMCA.

“Harry lovingly and respectfully recalls the personal and professional influence of three men in his life. We should all be so fortunate and grateful,” said Bill Reilly, owner of the river’s end bookstore in Oswego.

“So often in life, we don’t realize how deeply someone has affected us until it is too late. Harry has written a beautiful tribute to the men who influenced his understanding of the world and his place in it,” said Adele DelSavio, assistant director, resource and community development with Aurora of CNY.

“It was fun writing this book. Remembering these men brought back many strong emotional responses. For different reasons, each of these men made memorable impressions on me at critical times in my life. It was interesting to note that all three of these men shared similar traits; they were bright, they were patient, they were dependable, and they were true to their word. They were good guys and I want to share my remembrances of their wonderful, helpful contributions. I have been fortunate, it was a marvelous blessing to meet and know such men. They mattered to me and I believe I mattered to them,” said Nash.

A native of Rochester, Nash received his B.A. from SUNY Brockport in 1954, his masters from Syracuse University in 1955, and his Ed. D. from the George Peabody College for Teachers in Nashville, Tenn., in 1963.

Nash retired from SUNY Oswego in 1988 and lives in Oswego with his wife.

Their son, Martin, resides in Charlestown, W.Va., with his wife, Eydie, and their two sons, Ryan and Jayson.

Their other son, Timothy, lives in Graham, NC, with his wife, Cheri, and their children, Allison and Ian.

Nash’s latest release, as well as his previous works, Our Aging Brain and Brain Views; Essays on the Brain, is available at the river’s end bookstore, 19 W. Bridge St., Oswego, or directly from him at 315-342-0178 and [email protected]

The river’s end bookstore will host a book signing with Nash in October.

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