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‘Magical moments’ of Cortázar to come alive in dramatic performance

Actor and director Milton Loayza of SUNY Oswego's modern languages and literatures faculty will team with video/lighting designer Barry Steele to bring to life "magical moments of truth, horror and deliverance" in fiction writer Julio Cortázar's stories at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 30, in the Sheldon Hall ballroom.

Actor and director Milton Loayza of SUNY Oswego's modern languages and literatures faculty will team with video/lighting designer Barry Steele to bring to life "magical moments of truth, horror and deliverance" in fiction writer Julio Cortázar's stories at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 30, in the Sheldon Hall ballroom.

OSWEGO — Actor and director Milton Loayza of SUNY Oswego’s modern languages and literatures faculty will join forces with video/lighting designer Barry Steele to bring to life the stories of influential Argentine writer Julio Cortázar in a performance at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 30, in the Sheldon Hall ballroom.

Actor and director Milton Loayza of SUNY Oswego's modern languages and literatures faculty will team with video/lighting designer Barry Steele to bring to life "magical moments of truth, horror and deliverance" in fiction writer Julio Cortázar's stories at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 30, in the Sheldon Hall ballroom.
Actor and director Milton Loayza of SUNY Oswego’s modern languages and literatures faculty will team with video/lighting designer Barry Steele to bring to life “magical moments of truth, horror and deliverance” in fiction writer Julio Cortázar’s stories at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 30, in the Sheldon Hall ballroom.

In “Don’t Blame Anyone” — the presentation shares the title of one of Cortázar’s short stories — Loayza and Steele will work together to show the audience Cortázar tales that Time Magazine says “can induce the kind of chilling unease that strikes like a sound in the night.”

Loayza said the dramatic presentation will bring into focus inflections of memory, dream and perception characteristic of the author’s fiction. Steele’s video projection techniques will seek to bring to full expression the writer’s unique concept of space and time.

“In this stage adaptation, the ambiguity of a man’s experience turns into magical moments of truth, horror and deliverance,” Loayza said.

Founder and director of Autopista del Sur theatre group, Loayza has produced and performed Latin American plays at New York City’s New Perspectives Theatre and Hudson Memorial Church and at Syracuse’s Redhouse Art Center and Point of Contact Gallery. He recently appeared as Duende in the Syracuse Opera production of “Maria de Buenos Aires.”

Loayza brought “Asunción” by Ricardo Monti to the Oswego campus several years ago. He co-taught a course on Cortázar with history faculty member Christopher Mack and performer Paul Rajeckas as part of the college’s “Telling Tales” series of events.

For two decades, Steele has created the lighting, video and scenic designs for numerous opera, dance and music productions in the United States, Europe and Asia. His engagements include the San Francisco Opera Center, Ballet Stars of Moscow and Nai-Ni Chen Dance Company. Last January, he designed for “Maria de Buenos Aires” in Syracuse, and he currently is production designer for Battery Dance Company in New York City.

Tickets are $10 ($5 for children and $3 for SUNY Oswego students), available at SUNY Oswego’s Marano Campus Center box office, online at tickets.oswego.edu and by calling 315-312-3073.

Parking is included in the ticket price and is available in the employee and commuter lots across Washington Boulevard from Sheldon Hall.

Artswego, SUNY Oswego’s arts presentation organization, made a grant to help fund the production.