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Maroun class teams with Texas fourth graders for Read Around the Planet

As students in the Phoenix Central School District are dealing with a relentless winter season, they learned how their peers in Texas were coping with below-average temperatures while interacting with one another during a recent Read Around the Planet videoconference.

Michael A. Maroun Elementary School students ask questions to fourth-graders from Cedar Park, Texas, during a Read Around the Planet videoconference.
Michael A. Maroun Elementary School students ask questions to fourth-graders from Cedar Park, Texas, during a Read Around the Planet videoconference.

Fourth-graders in Rachel Faulkner’s class at Michael A. Maroun Elementary and fourth-grade students at Ada Mae Faubion Elementary School in Cedar Park, Texas, learned about the differences and similarities of their home states.

Students in Texas began the videoconference by performing a skit that detailed the history, geography, weather and different animals found in their state.

Phoenix students were amazed to learn that schools in Texas even get snow days on occasion.

“We had two snow days this year, but mostly because of the cold,” a Texas student said. “But we did close when we got less than an inch of snow.”

While that statement was met with laughter by the MAM fourth-graders, the videoconference provided much more than interesting facts and skits as the classes collaborated to write a poem.

Nathaniel Garrett, a fourth-grader at Michael A. Maroun Elementary School, talks to students from Cedar Park, Texas, during a Read Around the Planet videoconference.
Nathaniel Garrett, a fourth-grader at Michael A. Maroun Elementary School, talks to students from Cedar Park, Texas, during a Read Around the Planet videoconference.

Building on an experience that the students had last year when children’s poet Kenn Nesbitt came to Phoenix, the MAM students asked their Texas peers for a list of sports and a list of foods. Using a rhyme scheme and alliteration, the classes created two poems titled “Playing with your Food.”

The videoconference was part of a distance learning offering provided by Oswego County BOCES.

The program strives to bridge the gap in educational opportunities and enhance learning experiences for students, teachers and community members by providing overall program coordination services, technical support, identification of district needs and connectivity access to school districts and educational institutions.

For more information, call 963-4298 or visit www.oswegoboces.org/web/iss/distancelearning.

1 Comment

  1. Wow, technology has come along way , This is so great teaching children about weather in different parts of the country.

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