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Mayor Barlow Announces Reopening of State Route 48

Mayor Billy Barlow, center, snips the ribbon today to officially reopen a section of Route 48 near Munn Street that has been closed since February 2016.

Mayor Billy Barlow, center, snips the ribbon today (Nov. 20) to officially reopen a section of Route 48 near Munn Street that has been closed since February 2016.

OSWEGO – Standing near the intersection of Route 48 and Munn Street, Mayor Billy Barlow, joined by Seventh Ward Councilor Robert Corradino, other city employees and NYSDOT Personnel cut the ribbon to official reopen the stretch of roadway that has been closed for more than 21 months.

Mayor Billy Barlow, center, snips the ribbon today to officially reopen a section of Route 48 near Munn Street that has been closed since February 2016.
Mayor Billy Barlow, center, snips the ribbon today (Nov. 20) to officially reopen a section of Route 48 near Munn Street that has been closed since February 2016.

State Route 48 suffered a major road collapse in February of 2016.

Construction of the $1.7 million project started in late August of 2017.

The project has been completed and Route 48 is set to open slightly ahead of schedule as the initial timeline indicated a completion date of December 1.

The road had been temporarily closed but re-opened as a one-way only, southbound street for the summer of 2016.

The road had been closed since the middle of August when construction on the approximately $1.7 million project started.

Once the collapse happened, the city considered its funding choices for the “major job,” the mayor said.

Initially, the repair and reconstruction of State Route 48 may have been the responsibility of the city because although Route 48 is a State road, the collapse was within the city of Oswego limits.

“Initially, we were thinking the city would have to fund the entire job that was estimated at around $2 million,” he said. “Turns out, the final project came in at about $1.7 million.”

With the help of the NYS Department of Transportation, they were able to identify funding that allowed the city to be responsible for only five percent of the project costs, he said.

However, the city would have to hold off until the funds were available and the work would start in the late summer of 2017, he added.

“That was quite an easy decision as the city of Oswego simply couldn’t afford to allocate an unexpected $1.7 million for such a job,” the mayor said. “So, the wait was, I believe, well worth it. It was the right decision, the right thing to do.”

The mayor recognized the state DOT for its help. He also cited the staff of Barton and Logudice and the city employees and Malone Trucking who facilitated the project.

“I applaud the New York State Department of Transportation and Director of Planning and Management Mark Frechette for helping the city of Oswego secure funding for this project and the significant amount of assistance they provided us throughout this entire project. We worked hard to mitigate the effects and inconveniences caused by this unexpected road collapsed and I appreciate the cooperation of all those involved in this project, including the Oswego Country Club,” Barlow said.

“But most importantly, I want to thank the city of Oswego residents who had to deal with this detour for quite some time. I appreciate their cooperation and their patience,” Mayor Barlow added. “I hope that they agree with me that as inconvenient as it was, it was worth the wait to not have to fund a $1.7 million unexpected project. I’m thrilled to get this project done ahead of schedule and finally be able to safely open the road to vehicular traffic again.”

Seventh Ward Councilor Robert Corradino thanked the mayor for his leadership during the project.

He also recognized Bob Johnson in the Engineering Department and DPW Commissioner Tom Kells for their efforts.

“Those are my ‘remarks’ as a city councilor,” he said. “But as a city resident, I live around the corner, we’d be so pleased when this opens and the traffic comes this way (instead of the detour). I know a lot of my neighbors will be very, very pleased as well! So, on behalf of the entire Seventh Ward, thank you everyone for this new road.”

“I very much appreciate the patience of the Seventh Ward residents throughout this lengthy project. We experienced more vehicles and larger vehicles through our neighborhoods and the residents overall were very understanding,” the councilor added. “We are pleased to see this project completed and I applaud all those involved in making this project happen and saving the city a considerable amount of money while doing so.”

2 Comments

  1. It’s great they fixed the road but I live on 9th and Cayuga and when it rains the road flood’s out and in the winter it’s a ice skating rink they paved over the summer about 10 feet from the main problem spot but when u call or ask when there going to fix it u get no response but there trucks go up and down all day the mayor needs to get around and see the bad spots thru out the city and not keep giving money to his buddies to fix there places up downtown it’s there property not the city’s time to wake up and help the people that live and work here

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