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Mexico Boys Learn to Give After Receiving

  Biagia “Bessie” McCoy, of Oswego, enjoys her gift bag from the Hadcock family, of Mexico, a few days before Christmas. Pictured with McCoy are Josh and Jacob (in the foreground) Hadcock, who delivered gift bags along with a Wii gaming system to Oswego Hospital. The boys’ parents wanted their sons to learn about giving after they received 50,000 Christmas cards following a bogus story circulating on the Internet.
Biagia “Bessie” McCoy, of Oswego, enjoys her gift bag from the Hadcock family, of Mexico, a few days before Christmas. Pictured with McCoy are Josh and Jacob (in the foreground) Hadcock, who delivered gift bags along with a Wii gaming system to Oswego Hospital. The boys’ parents wanted their sons to learn about giving after they received 50,000 Christmas cards following a bogus story circulating on the Internet.

What started as a bogus post on the Internet, a Mexico family turned into a lesson on the importance of giving during this holiday season.

Ron and Amie Hadcock’s son, Jacob, began receiving Christmas cards in the mail in late November after a false post on the web said he was dying and all he wanted for Christmas was cards. Soon cards from throughout the world began appearing in the family’s mailbox, and to date more than 50,000 cards have been delivered to the house. Some of the cards contained money, all wished Jacob and his family a happy holiday.

As the cards piled up, the family decided to turn the situation into a lifelong lesson. “I wanted to teach the boys with the holiday season that it’s not all about receiving, it’s about giving,” Ron said. Jacob has a seven, year-old brother, Josh, who is a second grader at the Mexico Elementary School. “People have been very generous to us, which we appreciated, but we also felt it was important to give back to those who are sick during the holidays.”

So several days before Christmas, the family arrived at Oswego Hospital with gift bags full of presents to be given to patients that would spend the holiday in the hospital. They also brought along a Wii gaming system to be used by pediatric and older patients.

Carrie Kangah, R.N., BSN, clinical nurse manager of Oswego Hospital’s third floor, was very grateful for the gifts and the lesson taught. “It was a good way to pay it forward,” she said referring to the act of facilitating goodwill through one random deed of kindness at a time. “Our patients will certainly appreciate the generosity of this family. The use of the Wii will help our patients improve their mobility and will also help entertain our pediatric patients while they are hospitalized. The family included some great useful items in the gift bags that our patients can use both here and at home.”

Among the patients who received a gift courtesy of the family was Biagia “Bessie” McCoy, of Oswego. Her gift bag included a fleece blanket, candy, puzzle books and other items. “What these kids did was just beautiful,” she said.

That bogus post on the web began after Jacob told Santa during a Polar Express train ride that he wanted cards for Christmas. While Jacob is sick with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, also known as ALL, his parents say he is undergoing treatment and is doing very well.

Oswego Healthcare system includes the Oswego Hospital, The Manor at Seneca Hill, a skilled nursing facility; Springside at Seneca Hill, a retirement living community; an urgent care center in Fulton, as well as health services centers in Mexico, Parish and now Phoenix. For more information, call (315) 349-5500 or visit oswegohealth.org.