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Mock Vehicle Extrication Performed By CiTi Students

With student Jordan Gass observing, instructor Chuck Gabriel shows student Ashley Hatten how to properly break through a windshield with an ax.

With student Jordan Gass observing, instructor Chuck Gabriel shows student Ashley Hatten how to properly break through a windshield with an ax.

MEXICO, NY – Cold temperatures and a light drizzle didn’t deter students enrolled in the Public Safety and Justice Program at the Center for Instruction, Technology and Innovation from receiving a powerful vehicle extrication lesson recently in the parking lot of CiTi’s Mexico campus.

With student Jordan Gass observing, instructor Chuck Gabriel shows student Ashley Hatten how to properly break through a windshield with an ax.
With student Jordan Gass observing, instructor Chuck Gabriel shows student Ashley Hatten how to properly break through a windshield with an ax.

With the help of the Mexico Volunteer Fire Department, students received a hands-on lesson in vehicle extrication under the guidance of instructors Mark Bender and Chuck Gabriel.

Using an assortment of tools, students demonstrated how to safely remove a patient trapped inside a vehicle.

After receiving a reminder in safety protocol, students began utilizing their training in a mock crash scenario, practicing on vehicles donated by Jay’s Auto Recovery of Parish.

“Just remember, there are a lot of different options to get the patient out,” said Gabriel. “There’s a method for everything.”

The extrication began by students stabilizing the vehicle with wooden blocks and then cutting power to the vehicle’s battery.

Students were then asked to blow out the side windows and detach the windshield with an ax and glass saw.

Student Dillon DeWitt successfully breaks through a side window during a recent vehicle extrication conducted by CiTi’s Public Safety and Justice Program.
Student Dillon DeWitt successfully breaks through a side window during a recent vehicle extrication conducted by CiTi’s Public Safety and Justice Program.

Once the windows were removed, students began to remove the vehicle’s doors with a hydraulic cutter and spreader.

Students alternated turns on the powerful hydraulic tools until each door was cleanly removed from the vehicle’s frame.

“Patient safety and rescuer safety is an absolute top priority and throughout the year this is reinforced,” said Bender. “I was very happy with how the students did. They all enjoyed it and worked hard.”

The extrication ended with a little science experiment, as the instructors showed students that a piece of porcelain the size of a pencil eraser could shatter a side window.

The direct force caused by the porcelain was enough to penetrate through the glass, much to the pleasure of the students.