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NYS Police Demonstrate Meaning of ‘Man’s Best Friend’

MEXICO – With the dog days of summer quickly approaching, Public Safety and Justice students at the Center for Instruction, Technology and Innovation recently learned how important K-9 units can be in the line of duty.

New York State Trooper Kevin Conners, simulating a fleeing suspect, is quickly tracked down by patrol dog Mandin, during a K-9 unit demonstration recently held at CiTi.
New York State Trooper Kevin Conners, simulating a fleeing suspect, is quickly tracked down by patrol dog Mandin, during a K-9 unit demonstration recently held at CiTi.

Mark Bender, a Public Safety and Justice instructor and full-time New York State Trooper, brought in his patrol dog, Mandin, to show specific scenarios in which law enforcement officials may implement the help of a K-9 unit.

These scenarios include searching for narcotics and criminal tracking and apprehension.

Bender, along with fellow trooper Kevin Conners, staged several scenarios to showcase the talents of Mandin.

In one example, Conners simulated a criminal fleeing from his vehicle and was quickly chased down and apprehended by the German shepherd.

Conners also brought his patrol dog, Lynde, to simulate how K-9 units are utilized to help track a suspect.

Mark Bender, a Public Safety and Justice instructor at CiTi and a full-time New York State Trooper, brought his patrol dog, Mandin, to demonstrate specific scenarios in which a patrol dog could be utilized. Pictured, Bender and Mandin celebrate after successfully completing an exercise.
Mark Bender, a Public Safety and Justice instructor at CiTi and a full-time New York State Trooper, brought his patrol dog, Mandin, to demonstrate specific scenarios in which a patrol dog could be utilized. Pictured, Bender and Mandin celebrate after successfully completing an exercise.

Lynde is part of the New York State Police Bloodhound Team and is a trained scent-specific trailing dog.

Throughout the demonstrations, Conners and Bender continually yelled out orders to their four-legged friends, giving students the understanding that there is more to the process than simply releasing the dogs.

Regardless of the intensity each dog showed while performing a specific task, both immediately listened to instructions, showcasing the strong bond between the troopers and their patrol dogs.