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Oswego County Historical Society to Dedicate Historic Marker Recognizing the Richardson Theater

The Oswego County Historical Society will host a dedication of a historic roadside marker recognizing the former Richardson Theater of the city of Oswego. It will take place May 23 at 1 p.m. in front of 120 E. First St. A presentation by will be given, including a brief history of the Richardson Theater and its importance in Oswego history. The community event is open to the public. Pictured is a vintage photograph of the Richardson Theater exterior at its former location at of the northwest corner of East First and Oneida streets.

The Oswego County Historical Society will host a dedication of a historic roadside marker recognizing the former Richardson Theater of the city of Oswego. It will take place May 23 at 1 p.m. in front of 120 E. First St. A presentation by will be given, including a brief history of the Richardson Theater and its importance in Oswego history. The community event is open to the public. Pictured is a vintage photograph of the Richardson Theater exterior at its former location at of the northwest corner of East First and Oneida streets.

OSWEGO — The Oswego County Historical Society will host a dedication of a historic roadside marker recognizing the former location of Richardson Theater in the city Oswego.

It will take place on May 23 at 1 p.m. in front of 120 E. First St.

The Oswego County Historical Society will host a dedication of a historic roadside marker recognizing the former Richardson Theater of the city of Oswego. It will take place May 23 at 1 p.m. in front of 120 E. First St. A presentation by will be given, including a brief history of the Richardson Theater and its importance in Oswego history. The community event is open to the public. Pictured is a vintage photograph of the Richardson Theater exterior at its former location at of the northwest corner of East First and Oneida streets.
The Oswego County Historical Society will host a dedication of a historic roadside marker recognizing the former Richardson Theater of the city of Oswego. It will take place May 23 at 1 p.m. in front of 120 E. First St. A presentation by will be given, including a brief history of the Richardson Theater and its importance in Oswego history. The community event is open to the public. Pictured is a vintage photograph of the Richardson Theater exterior at its former location at of the northwest corner of East First and Oneida streets.

The community related event is open to the public.

Anyone interested in the local history of Oswego is encouraged to attend.

Guest speakers will include Mayor Billy Barlow, Oswego City Historian Mark Slosek and Rick Sivers, vice president of the historical society board of trustees.

Sivers successfully applied to the William G. Pomeroy Foundation historic roadside marker grant program.

The foundation initiated the grant opportunity in 2006 to encourage community appreciation and understanding of local history, along with helping to promote heritage tourism.

Pomeroy Foundation representative Susan Hughes will share the benefits of the grant program and how it can development cultural and educational interest.

Sivers will give a brief history of Richardson Theater which opened in January of 1895.

Ground was broken on the northwest corner of East First and Oneida streets, now the parking lot of the current Education Center.

Using his own money, real estate tycoon Max Richardson, who had served twice as mayor of Oswego, set out to make the city a stop on the national theater circuit.

The four-story brick building measuring 132 feet by 118 feet was anything but plain in the interior.

The auditorium seated 1,400, was lit by both gas and electric lights with a domed ceiling 40 feet in diameter.

Boxes lined the walls on each side of the auditorium nearest the stage. That stage was 50 feet deep and 68 feet wide and rivaled any in the state.

There were 50 fly lines for scenery on a grid 60 feet above the stage. A total of 25 permanent sets were available to touring companies that came to play the Richardson.

The stage opening was 32 feet high and 40 feet across.

Opening night on Jan. 24, 1895, brought out Oswego’s finest to get a look at the new theater and see a performance of the opera “Robin Hood.”

The performance was sold out and Max Richardson was lauded by the city for his grand theater.

During the lifetime of the theater from 1895 to 1945, 5,360 performances were given in the theater, showcasing the talents of such notables as Otis Skinner, David Balasco, Ethel Barrymore, Lillian Russell, Maude Adams, George Arliss, Alfred Lunt; as well as musicians, orchestras and bands, topped off by two appearances by John Phillip Sousa and his band in 1896 and 1899.

The first silent movie shown at the Richardson was in 1897 and the first picture with sound in July 1912. Spectaculars such as “Ben Hur” played the Richardson.

But with advent of vaudeville, World War I, the Great Depression and motion pictures, the Richardson Theater was seen as too distant a location for the waning number of touring companies.

That lack of national interest in the Richardson, the proliferation of movie houses around Oswego and maintenance issues at the theater building, resulted in its eventual closing and demolition in 1945.

The Oswego County Historical Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the preservation and promotion of the rich history of the county.

The society maintains and operates the Richardson-Bates House Museum, a historic landmark listed on the National Register of Historic Places, built as the private residence of Maxwell Richardson.

The museum is open to the public Thursday, Friday and Saturday from 1-5 p.m, and other days by appointment.

For more information call the museum during regular hours at 343-1342.