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September 25, 2018

Students teach in ‘Real World’ opportunity


Students at Sandy Creek High School participated in a recent project that gave them an opportunity to experience what parenting is all about – teaching.

Kendra Valley, a senior in the Sandy Creek Central School District, teaches Universal Pre-Kindergarten student Madilyn Norton how to make homemade play dough during a recent school day. Seniors in the Real World class at the school district planned and organized the teaching activity as part of the parenting unit in the class.

Kendra Valley, a senior in the Sandy Creek Central School District, teaches Universal Pre-Kindergarten student Madilyn Norton how to make homemade play dough during a recent school day. Seniors in the Real World class at the school district planned and organized the teaching activity as part of the parenting unit in the class.

Family and Consumer Science Teacher Marsha Maxon paired seniors in her Real World class with students in the district’s Universal Pre-Kindergarten program for a play dough-making lesson.

While fun and engaging for the young UPK students, the unique activity gave Real World students an opportunity to see two very different perspectives – that of a parent or teacher and that of a student or child.

Students experienced the pre-planning and preparation that goes into organizing an activity as well as gained a greater understanding of how to communicate and relate to young children.

Sandy Creek High School student Tyler Reff and Universal Pre-Kindergarten student Emily Woods share a laugh together as they make fun shapes out of play dough. Reff and his classmates in the Real World class were paired with students in the District’s UPK program for an activity that gave the high school students an opportunity to experience what parenting is all about – teaching.

Sandy Creek High School student Tyler Reff and Universal Pre-Kindergarten student Emily Woods share a laugh together as they make fun shapes out of play dough. Reff and his classmates in the Real World class were paired with students in the District’s UPK program for an activity that gave the high school students an opportunity to experience what parenting is all about – teaching.

As a follow-up to the activity each Real World student was asked to write a reflective paragraph on the experience and their observations.

Many of the students’ reflections talked about the importance of patience and communication when dealing with children, but Tyler Reff summed up the activity best by saying: “While you’re working with children you have to have patience. You can’t get mad at them for going slow or doing something wrong. You have to teach them so they know how to do it right.”

The play dough activity was coordinated as part of a parenting unit in the Real World class.

Sandy Creek Universal Pre-Kindergarten student Lyndi Fitzgerald and high school student Alexis Donohoe crafted a heart out of the homemade play dough that they made together during a recent activity in the district’s Real World class. The activity was coordinated in conjunction with a parenting unit in the Real World class, giving high school seniors an opportunity to see two very different perspectives - that of a parent or teacher and that of a student or child.

Sandy Creek Universal Pre-Kindergarten student Lyndi Fitzgerald and high school student Alexis Donohoe crafted a heart out of the homemade play dough that they made together during a recent activity in the district’s Real World class. The activity was coordinated in conjunction with a parenting unit in the Real World class, giving high school seniors an opportunity to see two very different perspectives – that of a parent or teacher and that of a student or child.

During this unit the students study key foundations of parenting and the role of serving as a child’s most important and life-long teacher.

Students participate in classroom discussions and activities that cover topics such as parent-child communication, dealing with feelings of anger or frustration, disciplinary alternatives as well as modeling virtues of respect, honesty, and responsibility.

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