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Students, Teachers In Hannibal Benefiting From iPad Instruction

In an effort to keep up with new age technology and promote education gain, both students and teachers in the Hannibal Central School District are learning how to properly utilize iPads.

Technology integration specialist Amy Spath has been providing lessons throughout the district to help guide students and district personnel on how to properly make use of iPads.

As a way to bring the district up to speed with new age technologies, technology integration specialist Amy Spath has been working with students and instructors within the Hannibal Central School District on how to properly use iPads. Spath and first grade student Alison Griffin have some fun while practicing on an iPad.
As a way to bring the district up to speed with new age technologies, technology integration specialist Amy Spath has been working with students and instructors within the Hannibal Central School District on how to properly use iPads. Spath and first grade student Alison Griffin have some fun while practicing on an iPad.

According to Spath, the tablets are providing students with valuable lessons that can translate to the classroom.

“This technology is out there and available, and these students are getting an opportunity to use it at a very young age,” Spath said. “It gives them a real life experience. Now they can go home and help their parents use iPads.”

Spath said she has been teaching students both basic and advanced lessons on the iPads, depending on a student’s experience level with the technology.

Recently, Spath instructed five second-grade students to create a project on Puppet Pals, an app that allows users to create animated movies based on a photo they took with the iPad’s camera.

For the project, students had to take a photo, choose a backdrop the app provided to represent the movie’s setting, zoom in and rotate the photo by sliding their fingers on the iPad screen and record audio to represent the movie’s narration.

After meeting all the requirements of the project, the students returned to their classroom and explained to their classmates what they learned.

Spath then showed each movie, much to the amazement of the class and their teacher, Rhoda Koskowski.

In terms of instructing teachers throughout the district, Spath said the key is to get teachers comfortable enough to incorporate the iPads into their lesson plans.

“I think some teachers get nervous to use technology. And if a teacher is nervous, then they’re not going to want to get in front of their class,” Spath said. “So helping teachers gives them that little boost that they need.”