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September 25, 2018

SUNY Oswego Grants Support Faculty, Student Scholarly and Creative Activity


OSWEGO — In keeping with SUNY Oswego’s support of faculty and undergraduate scholarship and creativity, the college’s Office of Provost recently announced 31 grants for faculty-student collaborative research and faculty studies and creative projects, plus four awards for faculty development of innovative courses.

SUNY Oswego recently announced 2017-18 campus scholarly and creative activity grants grants, including the Faculty-Student Challenge Grants, also known as Summer Scholars. In this photo, then-senior math major Amy Hannahan (left) discusses her scholarly poster with college President Deborah F. Stanley in September 2015 at the Summer Scholars Symposium in Sheldon Hall ballroom.

SUNY Oswego recently announced 2017-18 campus scholarly and creative activity grants grants, including the Faculty-Student Challenge Grants, also known as Summer Scholars. In this photo, then-senior math major Amy Hannahan (left) discusses her scholarly poster with college President Deborah F. Stanley in September 2015 at the Summer Scholars Symposium in Sheldon Hall ballroom.

The Provost’s Scholarly and Creative Activity Committee awards the grants for the collaborative program known as “Summer Scholars” — opportunities for faculty members and students to work together on research — and for faculty research studies and creative projects. The college’s Committee on Learning and Teaching approves Curriculum Innovation Grants for faculty developing groundbreaking courses.

The scholarly and creative work spans a broad spectrum of academic interest, from invasive crop pests to latent fingerprints, from media bias in the 2016 presidential campaign to bioinformatics in breast cancer research.

Between augmented reality in radiology during surgery, mathematical symmetries in music, measuring parental neglect, the projects only hint at the array of faculty and undergraduate work arising from SUNY Oswego’s more than110 programs of study.

Faculty-Student Challenge Grants (Summer Scholars):

Biological sciences: Poongodi Geetha-Loganathan and students Jessica Gibbons and Jerome Job, “Identifying the Source of Fungal Pathogens Threatening Snapping Turtles;” Peter Newell and student Gabrielle Solomon, “Microbiota of the Invasive Crop Pest Drosophila Suzukii;” Jennifer Olori and Samuel Rodgers, “Is Ranavirus Transmission Sexually Mediated?” and Michael Schummer and student Kayla Eason, “Influence of Wetland Restoration and Management on Density and Diversity of Aquatic Macorovertebrates.”

Chemistry: Matthew Baker and student Cory Ludwig, “Design and Synthesis of Ladder Forming Signal-responsive Polymers;” Fehmi Damkaci and students Francesco Papa and Brittney Colon, “N-Phenyl Picolinic Amide Ligand in Aryl Cyanation;” Shokouh Haddadi and student Kate Bailie, “Investigating the Effect of Gender on Chemical Composition of Latent Fingerprints” and Julia Koeppe and student Veronica Singh, “Expression of Complement Component 2 in Yeast and E. Coli.”

Communication studies: Arvind Diddi and students Jamie Aranoff and Elena Kilgore, “Assessing News Media Bias in the 2016 Presidential Campaign;” computer science: Isabelle Bichindaritz and students Joseph Harkness and Ekaterina Cole, “Role of WAVE Complex in Breast Cancer through Bioinformatics Analyses” and Damian Schofield, Jolanda Tromp and Isabelle Bichindaritz and student Christopher Bartlett, “Applying Augmented Reality Technologies to Interventional Radiology during Surgery;” counseling and psychological services: Laura Spenceley and student Marisa Valentino, “Predicting the Extended Time Necessary for Equal Access.”

Electrical and computer engineering: Marianne Hromalik and student Christopher Wells, “High Speed Oscillator-based Data Transfer Interface for X-ray Pixel Array Detectors;” mathematics: Elizabeth Wilcox and student S. Mia Tomassetti, “Symmetries in Music;” physics: Shashi Kanbur and student Christopher Wells, “A Binary Event Broker for the Large Synaptic Survey Telescope;” and psychology: Matthew Dykas and student Caitlyn Carlisle, ” Advancing the Measurement of Parental Neglect.”

Faculty Scholarly and Creative Activity Grants:

Biological sciences: David Dunn, “Genome Editing of Growth-related Genes in Mouse and Pig Cell Lines as a Model for Animal Experimentation;” Kamal Mohamed and Anthony Contento, “Genetic Differences in the African Striga Asiatica Species Group and Their Relation to the Indian S. Asiatica;” Karen Sime, “Oviposition Patterns and Parasitism of the Bog Buckmoth” and Sofia Windstam, “Is Ranavirus Transmission Sexually Mediated?”

Anthropology: Douglas Pippin, “William Twiss and the American Revolution in Canada: An Archaelogical Perspective;” chemistry: Julia Koeppe, “Expression of Complement Component 2 in Yeast and E. Coli;” English: Neelika Jayawardane, “Comrades with Cameras: The Afrapix Photographers Agency and the South African Anti-Apartheid Movement;” mathematics: Sarah Hanusch, “Improving Student Proof Productions via Written Feedback in Undergraduate Mathematics Courses;” music: Todd Graber, “Professional Recording of Schubert’s ‘Winterreise;'” philosophy: Craig Delancey, “Personal Identity and Emotional Disposition;” political science: Cristina Dragomir, “At the Crossfire of Marginalization: How Gypsy Women in India and Romania Access Healthcare” and public justice: Jeremy Shifton, “How Race and Gender Impact Juror Perceptions of Evidence in Criminal Trials.”

Curriculum Innovation Grants:

English and creative writing: Joshua Adams and Bennet Schaber, “Drone Theory, Drone Vision;” communication studies: Jenny Rosenberg and Jessica Reeher, “Communicating with Diverse Identities;” economics: Lyudmyla Ardan, “Economics of Education” and mathematics: Mark Baker and Scott Preston, “Data Mining and Predictive Analytics.”

For more information on SUNY Oswego and its programs, visit oswego.edu/academics.

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