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September 23, 2018

Technology students at KMS launch water rockets


Seventh grade technology students at Kenney Middle School took advantage of the above average temperatures recently and launched water rockets outside of the school.

Stefano Perezarnold gives a thumbs up after successfully deploying his water rocket in Gregory Bailey’s technology classroom. His egg, representing an astronaut, stayed intact during its outdoor launch. Others in the class weren’t so fortunate.

Stefano Perezarnold gives a thumbs up after successfully deploying his water rocket in Gregory Bailey’s technology classroom. His egg, representing an astronaut, stayed intact during its outdoor launch. Others in the class weren’t so fortunate.

Two sections of seventh-grade technology students worked on a water rocket project over the span of two and a half weeks.

Technology education teacher Gregory Bailey assigns the problem-solving activity to his students each year.

Before construction of the rockets began, students watched “October Sky” in class and sampled Tang.

They were also asked to use Internet research to select an actual astronaut and rocket mission for their team project.

To create the rockets, students used two-liter soda bottles as engines and foam fins for stability.

They then needed to use a computer program to determine how much water their rocket needed so that it would fly to its maximum height.

Students had to collect data and convert liters and ounces.

Students were also given an egg and were expected to keep the egg safe in the water rocket by creating a cargo bay.

Seventh grade technology students Jamie Landis and Jade Holmes display their water rocket before using it in a test flight.

Seventh grade technology students Jamie Landis and Jade Holmes display their water rocket before using it in a test flight.

Members of the class were partially graded on whether or not their “eggstronaut” made it to the ground safely after being launched.

Students used insulation and bubble wrap to protect their egg.

Several rockets deployed during the test flights, including one that Bailey described as the heaviest rocket he’s ever flown.

The same rocket also featured two parachutes as part of its recovery system.

Bailey asked students to compare and contrast their experience working independently versus on a team.

The next classroom project, the Pinewood Derby, teaches technology students basic physics.

Both projects integrate many elements of the common core learning standards.

Kenney Middle School Technology teacher Gregory Bailey stands with some of his seventh grade students during a water rocket launch. Students constructed the rockets using two liter soda bottles and other basic materials.

Kenney Middle School Technology teacher Gregory Bailey stands with some of his seventh grade students during a water rocket launch. Students constructed the rockets using two liter soda bottles and other basic materials.

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