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September 22, 2018

Wilcox/Glenister family continues to fight EEE


OSWEGO, NY – As the heats up, so does The Maggie Sue Glenister Wilcox Foundation’s efforts to battle Eastern Equine Encephalitis.

In June the organization held The MSGW Bug Run Field Days and marked the second Bug Run event organized and attended by members of The Oswego County Comets Riding Club, as well as many other motorcycle enthusiasts from around the county.

Members of the Oswego County Comets Motorcycle Riding Club present a donation to the Maggie Sue Glenister Wilcox Foundation after this year's Bug Run, which will now be an annual fundraising event for the foundation and the Comets. From left are: Tom Reep, Jim Kosbob, Jeff Beardslee (president of the Comets), Pastor Vivian Summerville, Barb Wilcox, Donna Wilcox, Brenda Krutchman and Fran Moshier (vice president of the Comets).

Members of the Oswego County Comets Motorcycle Riding Club present a donation to the Maggie Sue Glenister Wilcox Foundation after this year’s Bug Run, which will now be an annual fundraising event for the foundation and the Comets. From left are: Tom Reep, Jim Kosbob, Jeff Beardslee (president of the Comets), Pastor Vivian Summerville, Barb Wilcox, Donna Wilcox, Brenda Krutchman and Fran Moshier (vice president of the Comets).

The event was held to assist in the fundraising efforts of the MSGW Foundation, Inc., a not-for-profit corporation organized in late 2012 by the Wilcox/Glenister family of New Haven.

Its mission is to spread awareness of and push to procure funding for the research and development of a human vaccine for Eastern Equine Encephalitis, more commonly referred to as EEE.

The deadly virus took the life of the foundation’s Maggie Sue in the fall of 2011.

“At the first fundraiser in March, well over $15,000 was raised through very generous donations,” according to Donna Wilcox, Maggie’s aunt. “Members of the Comets, at their regular monthly meeting on June 18 at Hazzy’s Tavern in New Haven, presented the MSGW Foundation with a sizeable donation that they raised throughout the course of the Bug  Run. It helped to bring the total donations received by the foundation for that day to more than $2,000.”

The Oswego County Comets, formed in 2005 to keep the spirit of motorcycling alive in Oswego County, was based on the original 1939 membership of returning war veterans, which was defunct by 1978.

The credo of the Comets is to promote brother and sisterhood  of motorcycling  while working on civic-minded community events, benefits and rides and in “Keeping the Ride Alive” for motorcycle enthusiasts of all ages.

The MSGW Foundation, in working  from information provided by Congressman Dan Maffei’s office, will donate the net proceeds from all fundraising efforts that have thus far been held into a fund in Maggie Sue’s name, which is overseen by The National Institute of Health  in Bethesda, Md., in conjunction with the Department of Defense, towards realizing the goal of a human vaccine for EEE.

All funds provided to the NIH will be utilized solely by that entity for EEE vaccine research currently under way by those two government agencies.

Through the tremendous generosity and support of our friends and neighbors, the initial funding to be provided by the foundation will be an amount of more than $10,000.

The Oswego County Comets  meets at Hazzy’s Tavern in New Haven on the third Tuesday of every month and membership is open to all those interested in joining an organization supportive of community fellowship and growth.

Both The MSGW Foundation and the Oswego County Comets Motorcycle Riding Club can be found on Facebook.

The family wants to make sure the public is educated about EEE, so that no other family has to go through what they have. The ultimate goal is to one day have a vaccine available to the general public.

Eastern Equine Encephalitis is an inflammation of the brain, the symptoms of which are the sudden onset of a debilitating headache, high fever, chills and vomiting progressing into disorientation, seizures, coma and death.

This illness has no cure.

One in three children or adults who become infected will die and those who may survive typically suffer severe, irreversible and devastating brain damage.

Those most at risk for contracting this virus are children under the age of 15 and adults over the age of 50.

The Maggie Sue Glenister Wilcox Foundation, is a 501c (3) not-for-profit corporation. It’s a solely volunteer based corporation that was organized by Maggie Sue’s family after her sudden and tragic death on August 14, 2011.

For more information or to make a donation, contact the foundation at: Post Office Box 236, New Haven, NY 13121 or 315-592-1033.
Facebook: beawarecauseitsrare Fight Triple E
Email: [email protected]

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