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County To Further Scrutinize Options For Health Care Programs

OSWEGO, NY – A resolution to initiate a request for proposals to explore alternatives for home health care in the county was sent back to the committee level at this month’s legislature meeting.

Legislators have several questions about how this will impact the county’s employees and budget.

Prior to the start of the regular meeting, Janet Clerkin, president of the Oswego County Professional Association. It’s the labor union that represents many of the middle management, supervisory staff and several departments of county government.

“We recognize and respect that the county is being forced to adapt to many economic and legislative conditions and factors that you have no control over,” she told the legislators.

New York State is no longer providing state aid reimbursements to counties for their Certified Home Health Agency (CHHA) and Long Term Care (LTC) programs, explained Phil Church, county administrator.

Last May, the Health Committee examined there options relating to the matter, discussing the advantaged and disadvantages of all of them.

The committee recognized that the phase out over two years of the state’s funding meant that the full negative impact that would have to be mitigated would not be known until the 2012 budget is developed.

The committee directed the Health Department to pursue “Option 1,” to refine its reform and efficiency plan and report back to the committee. They would continue the programs, giving the department the opportunity to make adjustments in personnel assignments, service delivery and claiming practices to minimize the net county cost.

The committee also directed the administration to examine budgetary and cost report data and prepare a draft RFP (request for proposals) to sell Oswego County’s certification to a licensed home care provider. That is a state-monitored process that can take about two years to complete. And, it requires final state approval.

These steps have been completed, the administrator pointed out.

If the county decides to sell its certificate, 18 employees would be laid off, including nurses and support staff.

However, the RFP would require they buyer to offer employment to all former county CHHA and LTC staff, so no one would become unemployed, except by choice.

The former employees would be removed from the NYS retirement system.

“Several of our members would be affected if these two programs were outsourced,” Clerkin said. “They supervise and oversee the health care of fragile and vulnerable patients in our county. Many of their functions cross over into other programs such as quality control, monitoring the Health Department emergency management function and working in public health emergencies and immunization clinics. If their jobs are eliminated, these vital programs would also be affected.”

When people fear they are going to lose their jobs, they start looking for other employment, she said, adding that when one staff person leaves, it jeopardizes the program’s ability to safely maintain patient care levels and that in turn jeopardizes the revenue that the program is able to generate.

They are also concerned about the impact on residents in the rural areas of the county who don’t have access to private sector nursing services.

She asked the legislature to give the Health Department more time to demonstrate the continued viability of the programs.

The staff members live in the county and have families here, she pointed out.

“They care for the residents of Oswego County and they spend their paychecks here in Oswego County,” she said.

Legislator Jake Mulcahey noted that the estimated amount of lost revenue had changed since the matter was discussed in committee.

“I’m just a little concerned that everything has changed,” he said.

The numbers are “continually” changing in regard to this issue, Legislator Shawn Doyle explained.

“The numbers are always changing. They’ll be different next week,” he said. “We could actually be able to see a profit. So I think it is entirely pertinent to pull this resolution until we do get a better look at the figures.”

The matter will likely be back on the committee agenda next month for further discussion.

Epilepsy Resources Available Locally for Kids and Adults

A legislative column by Assemblyman Will Barclay

Epilepsy affects one out of 100 Americans. It is a medical condition that produces seizures, which affect a variety of mental and physical functions. When a person has two or more unprovoked seizures, they are considered to have epilepsy.

In a recent New York Times article, the chairman of the Epilepsy Foundation, Dr. Brien Smith, chief of neurology at Spectrum Health in Michigan explained that his epilepsy started at a young age. In the article he states “I remember waking up as a young child with weird dreams — a kaleidoscope view of the world. In my midteens I had these feelings of kind of a brain warp that would pass. Finally as a junior in high school, I had a seizure getting out of the car in the high school parking lot.” It was later determined that he had a brain tumor, which never showed up on early scans, but was likely the cause of his seizures. Many other conditions can cause seizures and all seizures do not look alike. In the same article, he recalls what it was like to have a seizure in front of his fellow medical students and how most reacted: frozen with fear.

A seizure happens when a brief, strong surge of electrical activity affects part or all of the brain, according to the Epilepsy Foundation’s website. One in 10 adults will have a seizure sometime during their life. Seizures can last from a few seconds to a few minutes. They can have many symptoms, from convulsions and loss of consciousness to some that are not always recognized as seizures by the person experiencing them or by health care professionals: blank staring, lip smacking, or jerking movements of arms and legs.

Local and national advocacy groups are banding together to change the stigma that is attached, better educate the public, and reach out to healthcare providers to educate them on the different types of seizures and possible causes. This month Syracuse hosted its first ever walk to raise awareness about epilepsy at Onondaga Lake Parkway. Local resources are available to those who experience seizures. The Epilepsy Foundation of Rochester, Syracuse and Binghamton has many resources available. They may be reached at (585) 442-4430 or visit www.epilepsy-uny.org. NY Employment Solutions also provides individualized employment solutions for individuals with epilepsy, traumatic brain injuries, and other neurological impairments. The program director in Syracuse can be contacted at (877) 214-7715 or for more information, visit www.nyemploymentsolutions.org.

Camp EAGR, which stands for Epilepsy Association of Greater Rochester, is a week-long residential camp for boys and girls, ages 8 to 17 who have epilepsy, regardless of seizure control, ambulatory and personal care needs. Camp EAGR gives kids a chance to build self-confidence, self-esteem, independence and social skills. I was able to watch a video of kids climbing rock walls, swimming and horseback riding at Camp EAGR. They sure looked like they were having fun together.

This is a great camp for kids with epilepsy. It allows campers to connect with other kids who have had similar experiences. This may be the first time that children have met other kids with epilepsy. The week-long stay is $400 and includes food, lodging and access to all camp facilities. To sign up or to find out more information, call Michael Radell at (585) 442-4430 x2702 or write to him at mradell@epilepsy-uny.org. The deadline to register is Aug. 1 and requires a non-refundable deposit of $25.

If you have any questions or comments on this or any other state issue, or if you would like to be added to my mailing list or receive my newsletter, please contact my office. My office can be reached by mail at 200 North Second Street, Fulton, New York 13069, by e-mail at barclaw@assembly.state.ny.us or by calling (315) 598-5185. You may also friend me, Assemblyman Barclay, on Facebook.

Community Member Makes Donation to Oswego Hospital in Memory of His Wife

Submitted by Oswego Health

In the photo from the left are Oswego Hospital Vice President and Chief Operating Officer Nancy Deavers, Myron E. Harbison and Oswego Health President and CEO Ann C. Gilpin.

In the photo from the left are Oswego Hospital Vice President and Chief Operating Officer Nancy Deavers, Myron E. Harbison and Oswego Health President and CEO Ann C. Gilpin.

Myron E. Harbison, an Oswego resident who is retired from the U.S. Navy, has made a significant donation to Oswego Hospital in memory of his wife, Mary A. Harbison.

“We greatly appreciate Mr. Harbison’s generous donation,” said Oswego Health President and CEO Ann C. Gilpin. “By making this donation, Mr. Harbison is ensuring the continuation of exceptional healthcare services and programs in his community.”

The Oswego Healthcare System includes Oswego Hospital, The Manor at Seneca Hill, a skilled nursing facility; Springside at Seneca Hill, a retirement living community; an urgent care center in Fulton, as well as health services centers in Mexico, Parish and Phoenix. For more information, call (315) 349-5500 or visit oswegohealth.org

Oswego County Health Department Announces Rabies Clinic in Hannibal Aug. 3

OSWEGO- The Oswego County Health Department will hold a rabies clinic Wednesday, Aug. 3, from 6to8 p.m.at the Hannibal Town Highway Garage,Cemetery Drive.

New YorkStatelaw requires that all cats, dogs, and pet ferrets be vaccinated against rabies. The first rabies vaccine should be given at three months of age. A second vaccination is required within one year of the first, and every three years thereafter.  In order for cats and dogs to receive the 3-year booster shot, owners need to show that the pet was previously vaccinated and should bring their pet’s last rabies vaccination certificate to the clinic.

The health department suggests a $5 donation per animal to help cover the cost of the rabies clinics, but no one will be turned away. Dogs should be leashed and cats and pet ferrets should be in a cage.

Any time a person or pet comes in physical contact with a bat or wild animal, especially a sick or suspicious-acting animal, the incident should be immediately reported to the County Health Department. To report a possible exposure, or for more information about rabies, call the Health Department weekdays at 349-3564 or 1-800-596-3200, ext. 3564.  In an emergency during evenings, weekends, or holidays, call the health department’s answering service at 341-0086.

Take A Walk For Health Benefits

Provided by Dr. Casey McCaffrey

OSWEGO, NY – What exercise is free, takes a minimal amount of equipment, can be done almost anywhere and has wonderful health benefits?

The answer is walking.

The weather is wonderful right now and I have had patients say that it feels so good to get outdoors and walk.

As a chiropractor, I like to hear that, because there are so many health benefits to this form of exercise such as: lowering blood pressure, burning calories, shaping and toning your legs and butt, strengthening back muscles, improving the cardio-vascular system, reducing stress, enhancing sleep and improving our mood, to mention only a few benefits.

As I have suggested earlier in my articles, walking can help arthritic joints.

It provides low-impact exercise.

As you have heard me caution you before, if you have any health condition, before you begin an exercise program, consult with your doctor. He can help you tailor it to your state of health.

Before you begin your walking program, whether it be intensive or slow-paced, make sure you have the proper shoes.

The other day I was in a local store looking for a pair of sneakers.

There are some that are pretty colorful and grab your attention from a distance, but fashion should not be your number one priority.

You want a stable sneaker that fits your foot properly.

It should provide flexibility yet cradle your foot securely.

If it pinches, feels too short or too narrow, keep on looking.

Many of us have learned the hard way that they do not stretch out and get better with time.

Get a pair that feels comfortable from the start.

Leather is the preferred material as it allows your feet to breathe.

Many of us go shopping on a Saturday morning or our day off when we have time and are rested, when our feet are rested.

The best way to get a proper fit in sneakers, however, is to go looking at the end of the day, when your feet have walked for a day, when they are swollen and tired.

That is the way to get the proper fit.

Some sneaks have wider toe boxes than others.

Some have roll bars for those of us who pronate and have a tendency to wear our shoes down on a certain side.

The list of features goes on.

Consult with an expert in the shoe department.

She/he can be invaluable.

I learned this firsthand.

Several years ago, I bought an excellent sneaker, good brand and very supportive.

It did not, however, work for me.

I later learned from a shoe expert that I had an excellent shoe; however, it was not the best for a person that pronates.

Asking questions about the shoe and the features for your foot type can save money in the long run and much discomfort.

Several patients have asked me about the new kind of sneaker that has a rocker type sole.

After that, I examined a pair in the store.

The verdict on those is not in as they are too new.

However, as a doctor, I am concerned about the lack of stability and the heightened chance of tripping or falling as a result of being off balance.

I would suggest not even considering them if you have any stability problems, spinal problems or foot problems.

I would caution people not to wear them on uneven surfaces and be especially cautious going up and down stairs.

Never wear them on a treadmill.

If you are set on getting a pair, try them out in your house first and then wear them for very short periods to get adjusted to them.

If you have never walked for exercise start out slowly – 15 minutes and when that becomes easy increase your pace and distance.

I have heard people say they have gone on walks and set a distance as their goal, only to find they were tired and the reality set in that they had to walk back.

Factor that in when you set your route.

We all, at one time or another, have set overly ambitious goals.

It can discourage us and cause us to abandon a good practice.

As with any exercise, warm up and then stretch out.

Yes, that is right. Warm up and then stretch out.

They are two different activities. It is important to warm up the entire body with special attention to the muscles you will be using. This increases flexibility and stretching helps prevents tears which can result from working cold muscles.

When walking it is important to stretch out the calf and shin muscles.

The most common way employed by many runners is the stretching negative position where you place the ball of your foot, not your toes, on the edge of a platform and lower the heels to stretch the calf. Hold that for 15-30 seconds then alternate legs.

To stretch the shins/tibial muscles, place one foot out and plantar flex/extend you foot.

To avoid back pain while walking, stand straight, look with your head level and chin parallel to the ground.

Looking down at the ground is a strain on your neck and can cause you to miss potential hazards in the surrounding environment.

Arching the back or leaning too far forward or backward puts stress on your back muscles.

Your arms should be held at 90 degrees and your hands should hang loosely. Clinching your fists for long periods is not good as it can elevate your blood pressure.

Keep your hands close to your body.

As you walk, the arm opposite the foot you are leading with will come straight forward not at a diagonal.

Walkers take smaller steps.

Their stride is longer behind their body.

This gives you more power and helps you walk more efficiently.

People that walk a lot gradually increase the number of steps per minute.

If you wish to become a dedicated walker but have never really done it, work up to it slowly.

Always be aware of your posture and form.

If you get too tired, you start compromising your posture and form and this will set you up for injuries to your neck, shoulder, back, leg muscles etc.

If you are going to begin a walking program and you have any health conditions, check with your doctor for perimeters and modifications.

I know I said this earlier in my article, but it is so important that it bears repeating.

If you have any misalignments in your spine see your chiropractor to correct these before you start your exercise program.

Enjoy your walking experience.

Dr. McCaffrey operates McCaffrey Chiropractic on 184 W. Fourth St., Suite #1, Oswego.

You may contact McCaffrey Chiropractic by calling 342-3877 or www.mccaffreychiro.com

OCO Mental Health Division Raising Awareness

FULTON, NY – It is said that there is a fear of the unknown.  As part of Oswego County Opportunities (OCO)’s recognition of May as National Mental Health Awareness Month, the agency’s Mental Health Residential Program is looking to erase the fears or misconceptions that may exist in relation to psychiatric illness by joining a nationwide effort to raise awareness of mental health and the resources that exist to aid those facing mental health issues.

Carolyn Hart, coordinator of OCO’s Mental Health Department, prepares to bake some homemade chocolate chip cookies for the Community Organizations Fair held recently at Breitbeck Park in Oswego. In the background is Peg Thompson, mental health transitional living supervisor with OCO.

Carolyn Hart, coordinator of OCO’s Mental Health Department, prepares to bake some homemade chocolate chip cookies for the Community Organizations Fair held recently at Breitbeck Park in Oswego. In the background is Peg Thompson, mental health transitional living supervisor with OCO.

Representatives from OCO’s Mental Health Transitional Living Program have made several appearances this month to distribute information regarding psychiatric illness, discussing how their program can be of assistance to those with psychiatric illness, and empowering community members to help raise the awareness of mental health by wearing the green ribbons they received and becoming familiar with the mental health resources that are available in Oswego County.

Supervisors of OCO’s Mental Health Residential Services Program, Apartment Treatment Program, Peg Thompson and Residence Supervisor, Beth Thompson, recently attended the community organizations fair at SUNY Oswego and the Mental Health Awareness event hosted by Families of those with Attention Deficit Disorder at Breitbeck Park in Oswego.

“These events were great opportunities to talk with community members and educate them about what we do and how we benefit our consumers and the communities that we serve,” said Peg Thompson. “We distributed hundreds of green ribbons, held a bake sale and discussed how community members can assist us in eliminating the stigma associated with psychiatric illness and spreading the word about the many services and program that are available for those dealing with mental health issues.”

Throughout the month of May, and the months ahead, Beth Thompson said that the Mental Health Transitional Living Program would continue to raise the awareness of mental health and work to eliminate some of the myths of mental illness.

“There are many misconceptions when it comes to psychiatric illness such as, people with schizophrenia are dangerous and unpredictable; those with post traumatic stress disorder have weak characters, and so on, the list of myths relating to mental health is endless. We are working to educate community members by educating them on the truths of mental illness and how it can be successfully addressed,” said Beth Thompson.

OCO’s Mental Health Transitional Living Program offers both a Supervised Residence and an Apartment Treatment Program.

Each are designed to help those diagnosed with a psychiatric illness meet their life goals and provide them with the tools and support they need to progress to a more independent life style.

A Family Care Home Program is also offered, for those desiring to live in a private home ‘family’ atmosphere with support and guidance of a caring family.

“Our sites provide consumers with a safe environment and a recovery based program that is person centered and focused on helping consumers achieve the goals they have established for themselves. Our consumers, who come to us on a referral basis, enjoy an open ended stay that offers them the opportunity to leave when they are ready to live independently. We provide them with rehabilitative services such as skill building that will help them transition through the program and into more independent living in the community. Once they do, we link them with community supports as needed to ensure that they will maintain successful independent living,” said Peg Thompson.

In addition to these local efforts, Peg Thompson, who is also a on the board of directors for the Oswego County Mental Health Association, traveled with Beth Thompson to Albany to attend Association of Community Living’s Lobby Day. Together with staff members and several OCO MHTL consumers, they met with Assemblyman Will Barclay and Sen. Patti Ritchie to share their concerns regarding legislation and funding issues affecting mental health issues.

“It was a worthwhile experience. Assemblyman Barclay and Sen. Ritchie welcomed the input of the consumers that made the trip with, and allowed staff the opportunity to advocate on their behalf,” said Peg Thompson.

In addition to its consumers, Thompson added that OCO’s Mental Health Transitional Living Program also benefits its community.

“This program helps to decrease individuals reliance on hospitalization as the only avenue for assistance, which is very costly. It also helps to addresses the issue of homelessness and makes the community stronger by empowering individuals and engaging them to become active members of their community,” she said.

For more information, call Carolyn Hart, program coordinator, at 598-9110 or visit www.oco.org

OCO Breast Health Program Participates In Race For The Cure

OSWEGO, NY – Oswego County Opportunities’ Breast Health Program joined more than 10,000 runners, walkers and survivors at the New York State Fairgrounds for one of Central New York’s largest fundraisers, the 17th Annual Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure, held May 14 at the NYS Fairgrounds in Syracuse.

Carolyn Handville and her team show their support for a cure for breast cancer at the annual Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure. In the back row from left are: Diane Blasczienski, Sheila Crandall, Allen Wert, Danielle Wert and Alicia Handville holding baby Marley. In the middle row from left are: Stephanie Guido, Jody Guido, Julia Smith, Sharon Margensey, Katie Batchelor, Ellen Holst and Heather Buckley. Front row from left are: Carolyn Handville holding baby Chase, Isaiah Williams, and Cheyanne Huller. Absent from the photo are team members, Kelly Baldwin, Jennifer Truax, Muriel Clark, Corte Spencer, Tricia Clark, Jane Peter, and Rick Smith.

Carolyn Handville and her team show their support for a cure for breast cancer at the annual Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure. In the back row from left are: Diane Blasczienski, Sheila Crandall, Allen Wert, Danielle Wert and Alicia Handville holding baby Marley. In the middle row from left are: Stephanie Guido, Jody Guido, Julia Smith, Sharon Margensey, Katie Batchelor, Ellen Holst and Heather Buckley. Front row from left are: Carolyn Handville holding baby Chase, Isaiah Williams, and Cheyanne Huller. Absent from the photo are team members, Kelly Baldwin, Jennifer Truax, Muriel Clark, Corte Spencer, Tricia Clark, Jane Peter, and Rick Smith.

According to organizers for the Komen race, this year’s attendance and donations surpassed $800,000, which is more than last year.

As the program director for OCO’s Breast Health Program, Carolyn Handville knows all too well just how important this event is for her community.

Up to 75 percent of net proceeds from this event are used for local programs and 25 percent is used to fund breast cancer research.

“OCO is a grant recipient of the Susan G. Komen CNY Foundation. The funds we receive from Komen enable us to screen more community members each year for breast cancer,” she said.

“Cancer touches so many lives. This particular event is so inspiring for me and motivates me to continue our efforts in Oswego County, educating men and women in our community on the importance of annual cancer screenings. We will screen more than 700 community members this year alone for breast cancer and provide breast health education to over 2,000 community members. I look forward to seeing that number increase next year by inspiring people to take charge of their health and receive the cancer screenings they need on a regular basis,” Handville added.

The race may be over, but people can still send in donations until June 15.

Visit the Komen website to donate to the OCO Breast Health Program team at www.race-komencny.org, or call Handville at 315-342-0888 ext.1455 for more details.

Rural Health Network Asks How Does Tobacco Look On You?

OSWEGO, NY – Working in collaboration with the Tobacco Free Network of Oswego County and the Oswego County Health Department, The Rural Health Network of Oswego County is stepping up the effort to decrease point of sale advertising and to raise awareness of tobacco advertising and promotional materials aimed at the target population of women between the ages of 14 to 24.

In Oswego County, the most recent statistics show that 75% of women in the Prenatal Care Assistance Program smoke, and 28% of mothers smoke during pregnancy, a figure that is the highest in this region and more than double that of the state average.

Danielle Wert (left), coordinator of the Rural Health Network of Oswego County, meets with Diane Oldenburg, senior public health educator (center), and Abby Jenkins, program coordinator for the Tobacco Free Network of Oswego County, to discuss the agency’s agenda to address the issue of tobacco use among women ages 14 to 24 in Oswego County.

Danielle Wert (left), coordinator of the Rural Health Network of Oswego County, meets with Diane Oldenburg, senior public health educator (center), and Abby Jenkins, program coordinator for the Tobacco Free Network of Oswego County, to discuss the agency’s agenda to address the issue of tobacco use among women ages 14 to 24 in Oswego County.

According to Abby Jenkins, program coordinator with the Tobacco Free Network of Oswego County, smoking among women 14 to 24 is of epic proportions and needs to be addressed for the health of our county.

“Tobacco use is the number one most preventable cause of death. Thanks to the NYS Clean Indoor Air Act and the federal Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act we have come along way in addressing tobacco use, but we have a lot of work ahead of us. The tobacco industry spends more than $12 billion annually on advertising and promotional materials, the biggest contributor to youth engaging in tobacco use. The tobacco industry will not stop trying to sell their products. Because of this, we need to continue our efforts to reduce the use of tobacco,” said Jenkins.

Diane Oldenburg, senior public health educator with the Oswego County Health Department, echoed those thoughts and is happy to partner with the Tobacco Free Network and the Rural Health Network in addressing the issue of tobacco use in Oswego County.

“According to the 2010-2013 Oswego County Community Health Assessment, Lung cancer rates for women in Oswego County during 2001-2005 were 82.2 per 100,000 people as opposed to the 53.8 per 100,000 New York State incidence rate. According to NYS Department of Health data, 17.9% of the adult population in the US smoked in 2009, 18% smoked in NYS and an astounding 24.7% were smoking in Oswego County. This project will help raise awareness and provide resources to women ages 14 to 24 and will decrease that extremely high percentage,” said Oldenburg.

She added that participation in the project reflects the department’s commitment to address the three health issues that they are currently focusing on:  chronic disease, physical activity and nutrition and reducing tobacco use.

To help accomplish their goal of decreasing point of sale advertising and to raise awareness of tobacco advertising and promotional materials aimed at the target population of women between the ages of 14 to 24 the Rural Health Network, the Tobacco Free Network and the Oswego County Health Department have established a precise plan of attack.

Danielle Wert, coordinator of the Rural Heath Network explains, “We have outlined a number of projects for the upcoming months that educate and empower women ages 14 to 24 to develop a healthier lifestyle by avoiding tobacco use. These projects include:

The use of pamphlets, posters and electronic media to educate women on the physical effects of tobacco use during pregnancy and on their appearance.

Enhancing the use of the NYS Smokers’ Quit Line that provides telephone counseling for those wishing to cease tobacco use.

Bringing women in the target group together to socialize with other women and learn new, healthier activities.

Outreach to the target group through monthly events to raise awareness of the negative affects of tobacco use.

Presentations to non-profit organizations, and other community groups to educate and empower them to assist in addressing the problem of tobacco use by this target group in Oswego County.

Reaching out to health care providers and human service organizations in an effort to engage them and their staff in our mission.”

“To ensure the effectiveness of these projects we will be using a technique called the 5A’s (Ask, Advise, Assess, Assist, and Arrange follow-up), as a brief intervention technique for tobacco control whenever possible during interactions with women,” Wert added.

One project that the Wert and her partners are especially excited about is the use of state-of-art progression software that will show the physical affects of tobacco over time.

“Research has shown that verbal warnings regarding future health problems caused by tobacco use not very effective with youth. However, being able to actually show someone how his or her appearance changes as a result of tobacco use will have a far greater impact. We will have this software with us at our presentations and at our appearances at various community events over the next five months. The software also has the capability to display the affects of obesity and sun exposure,” said Wert.

The collaborating agencies will also draw upon the strong relationships that they have fostered with numerous other organizations and health care providers throughout Oswego County that have direct access to the target audience of women age 14 to 24.

“Women have been extensively targeted in tobacco marketing,” added Jenkins. “Such marketing is dominated by themes of an association between social desirability, independence, and smoking messages conveyed through advertisements featuring slim, attractive, and athletic models. As early as the 1920s, tobacco advertising geared toward women included messages such as ‘Reach for a Lucky instead of a sweet’ to establish an association between smoking and slimness. The positioning of Lucky Strike as an aid to weight control led to a greater than 300% increase in sales for this brand in the first year of the advertising campaign. These types of marketing tactics have continually been furthered by brands such as Virginia Slims. Addressing this issue and altering the way women perceive tobacco use is a challenge, but it is one that we are dedicated to achieving.”

The How Does Tobacco Look on You? initiative will begin in May in recognition of World No Tobacco Day, May 31.

Established by the World Health Organization, the directing and coordinating authority for health within the United Nations system, whose initiatives include controlling the epidemic of tobacco among women with particular attention to the need to protect women and girls from the harmful effects of tobacco marketing.

For more information on the How Does Tobacco Look on You? initiative, or to schedule a presentation for your group or organization, contact Wert at 315-342-0888 ext. 1457.

Health Department Announces Clinic Schedule For Week Of May 2

OSWEGO, NY – The Oswego County Health Department offers a variety of services to all residents of Oswego County, including preventive health services, certified home health care, long-term home health care, certified hospice, and a maternal and child health program.

The following services will be offered during the week of May 2 at the Nick Sterio Public Health Clinic, 70 Bunner St., Oswego and the H. Douglas Barclay Courthouse, Pulaski.

Those who are covered by Medicaid or Medicare Part B should bring their cards to the clinic.

OSWEGO:

HIV Testing: May 2, 9 to 11:30 a.m., and May 3, 1 to 3 p.m., appointment needed.

Immunization Clinic: May 6, 12:30 to 3:30 p.m., walk-in clinic.

Pregnancy Testing: Free pregnancy testing is available. Call 349-3391 for appointment.

Sexually Transmitted Disease Testing and Treatment Services: Call 349-3547 for more information or to schedule an appointment.

PULASKI:

Immunization Clinic: May 6, 9 to 11 a.m., walk-in clinic.

VOLNEY:

Rabies Clinic: May, 4, 6 to 8 p.m. Bristol Hill Solid Waste Facilities, NYS Route 3.

Dogs must be leashed and cats and ferrets must be confined in a crate.

The health department suggests a $5 donation per animal to help cover the cost of the clinic.

Bring your pet’s last rabies certificate to the clinic.

For more information on public health services or to make an appointment, contact the County Health Department, weekdays, phone 349-3547 or 1-800-596-3200, ext. 3547.

Health Department Announces Clinic Schedule For Week of April 25

OSWEGO, NY – The Oswego County Health Department offers a variety of services to all residents of Oswego County, including preventive health services, certified home health care, long-term home health care, certified hospice, and a maternal and child health program.

The following services will be offered during the week of April 25 at the Nick Sterio Public Health Clinic, 70 Bunner St., Oswego.

OSWEGO:

HIV Testing: April 25, 9 to 11:30 a.m., and April 26, 1 to 3 p.m., appointment needed.

Immunization Clinic: April 29, 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. walk-in clinic.

Pregnancy Testing: Free pregnancy testing is available. Call 349-3391 for appointment.

Sexually Transmitted Disease Testing and Treatment Services: Appointment needed.

For more information on public health services or to make an appointment, contact the County Health Department, weekdays, phone 349-3547 or 1-800-596-3200, ext. 3547.

Those who are covered by Medicaid or Medicare Part B should bring their cards to the clinic.

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Thank You For Supporting Golf Classic

The United Way of Oswego County extends a sincere thank you to the many volunteers and sponsors whose commitment to the United Way 2014 Golf Classic again made the event an outstanding success. This year’s golf tournament, which featured morning and afternoon flights, hosted 46 teams and raised more than $29,000.

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Coleman submits family court judge petitions, launches campaign website

On Thursday morning (July 24), representatives of family court judge candidate Lou Anne Rucynski Coleman filed her nominating petitions for the November 4 general election. “We submitted more than double the number of signatures required,” said campaign coordinator Jake Mulcahey, calling the support the campaign has received from the community “enthusiastic.”

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