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September 26, 2018

American Bikers Aimed Toward Education Highlight Motorcycle Safety


OSWEGO, NY – SUNY Oswego Police Lieutenant Kevin Velzy welcomed ABATE Vice President Bruce Le Porte and President Jim Waterman to present a moving and informativeĀ  program on motorcycle safety.

The presentation was two fold: safer motorist behavior keeps motorcyclists safer.

From left are: Lt. Kevin Velzy, SUNY Police Department; Sandy Mensch, ABATE education officer; Bruce LePorte, ABATE vice president and presenter; and Jim Waterman, ABATE president.

From left are: Lt. Kevin Velzy, SUNY Police Department; Sandy Mensch, ABATE education officer; Bruce LePorte, ABATE vice president and presenter; and Jim Waterman, ABATE president.

LePorte explained that a motorist making a left turn was the most common way motorcyclists are hurt or killed.

To punctuate the point, several videos were shown that illustrated the deadly behaviors of motorists and distracted diving.

Motorcycles are at an extreme disadvantage when it comes to a collision with a car or truck.

Motorists mistakenly believe that motorcycles can stop on a dime, can always maneuver around debris and potholes, and do not need as much room as they would give another car – cars often follow too close, deny motorcycles the right of way and when an accident occurs, often say “I didn’t see the motorcycle.”

The audience was treated to slides that showed “motion induced blindness.”

When we look at movement and background, our eyes send the wrong signal to our brains and create a blind spot.

Looking twice and staying alert is the only way to engage the brain to actually see the motorcycle.

Just like we learned in kindergarten, “look left – right – left” to make sure our brain is taking in all the information it needs about what is around us.

Distracted driving, cell phones, texting, daydreaming, or just other passengers can all be deadly to the motorcyclist caught in a collision with a car.

“In a crash with a car, the motorcyclist is going to the hospital – no question,” explained Waterman who narrowly survived a crash 10 years ago.

Questions from the audience concluded with a fact that surprised everyone who attended – that eight teenagers die everyday in an alcohol related crashes.

ABATE’s message is clear, don’t drink and drive, pay attention to driving and “Look Twice For Motorcycles.”

Join ABATE’s Facebook page for more information on motorcycling, to book a safety presentation, and find out about upcoming events this motorcycle season.

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