Should old acquaintance be forgot…

OSWEGO – In a couple more hours, we will greet 2019 with champagne, kisses and singing at midnight.

One song in particular is a standard on New Year’s Eve.

But, if you’re like most people, you probably don’t know for sure just what you’re singing about when you join the crowd at the stroke of midnight and sing “Auld Lang Syne,” even if the only words you know are part of the chours.

So, what do those lyrics actually mean?

Originally, “Auld Lang Syne” was a Scottish poem.

Somewhere along the way, someone thought it would be a good idea to set it to music and sing on special occasions, like New Year’s Eve.

Auld lang syne translates literally to “old long since” in English and means something akin to “times gone by.”

In case you’d like to sing the complete song tonight, here are the full lyrics, translated from the original Scottish into English:

Should old acquaintance be forgot,
and never brought to mind?
Should old acquaintance be forgot,
and old lang syne?

CHORUS:
For auld lang syne, my dear,
for auld lang syne,
we’ll take a cup of kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.

And surely you’ll buy your pint cup!
and surely I’ll buy mine!
And we’ll take a cup o’ kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.

CHORUS

We two have run about the slopes,
and picked the daisies fine;
But we’ve wandered many a weary foot,
since auld lang syne.

CHORUS

We two have paddled in the stream,
from morning sun till dine;
But seas between us broad have roared
since auld lang syne.

CHORUS

And there’s a hand my trusty friend!
And give me a hand o’ thine!
And we’ll take a right good-will draught,
for auld lang syne.

CHORUS