We want your news! Send us: News release |Letter to the Editor | Share a picture | Newborn | Birthday | Engagement | Wedding | Other Milestone
Today









Sound Effects Key Weapon in ‘War of the Worlds’

The upcoming SUNY Oswego production of "War of the Worlds" will use sound effects and actors' reactions to create the terror and tension of a Martian invasion. In this rehearsal image, student performers (from left) Courtney Bennett, Stephanie Martinez (seated), Kate Boswell and Chris Wilson react to an off-stage horror.

The upcoming SUNY Oswego production of "War of the Worlds" will use sound effects and actors' reactions to create the terror and tension of a Martian invasion. In this rehearsal image, student performers (from left) Courtney Bennett, Stephanie Martinez (seated), Kate Boswell and Chris Wilson react to an off-stage horror.

OSWEGO — Audiences attending SUNY Oswego’s production of “War of the Worlds,” opening Oct. 14, will find sounds and storytelling designed to bring them into the action.

Sound design will be “a mix of live and recorded sound effects, meant to give the audience the opportunity to ‘be on the scene’ with the actors,” said sound designer Steve Shull of the theatre department.

Originally written for radio by Howard Koch, this adaptation of the H.G. Wells novel tells the story of a Martian invasion through documentary-style storytelling mixed with dramatic scenes.

The radio studio setting of the play offers the opportunity for the actors to become Foley artists creating live sound effects. The term dates to Jack Foley, who began his work in the silent film era in the area of sets and properties and later provided expertly detailed post-production sound effects for many productions at Universal Studios. Because of the influence of this pioneer in sound effects, his name became linked to the art of sound in radio and film.

“Sound effects in storytelling have been around since the first fisherman came home to tell everyone about the ‘big one that got away’ or the sounds that the ‘monster makes under my bed,’” Shull explained. “We have a wonderful ability to hear a sound and then decide what it must be.”
This production stretches the actors to create a believable sound effect or set of sounds to convince the audience that the scene is occurring in a kitchen, a car, a hospital or a battleground. “Audiences will be intrigued and delighted by this added dimension of theatricality,” said director Mark Cole, professor and chair of theatre at SUNY Oswego.

“The audience will be in on the secret by looking at the Foley artist make an effect, then as they listen to the actors, they connect the sound to the context,” Cole said. “This is much more than a staged reading — the language is thrilling, to be sure, but our door into the play also opens into a room where anything can happen.”

The radio studio setting for this play, designed by Tim Baumgartner, “is the pretense: the place of dreams, nightmares, the imagination and the uncanny,” Cole added. “With a mixture of sound, physical theatre and multimedia, the production promises to be a complete theatrical evening.”

In the production, a radio show is repeatedly interrupted by news bulletins regarding atmospheric disturbances on Mars, a report of a mysterious crash landing of what is thought to be a meteorite followed by reports and eyewitness accounts of a full-fledged invasion by Martian creatures.

In the 1938 script, a performance by “Ramon Raquello and His Orchestra” added to the authenticity of the breaking news bulletins and from-the-field interviews. “In our production a retelling of a local ghost story is continually interrupted by the news bulletins,” Cole noted. “The tensions escalate as the cast bounces between the radio play and the reports concerning the invasion.”

“War of the Worlds” will preview at 8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 13, with all seats $5. Regular shows have 8 p.m. curtains Oct. 14 to 17 with a 2:30 p.m. Sunday matinee Oct. 18. Tickets to the regular run cost $12 for adults ($10 for seniors or students, $7 for SUNY Oswego students).

The production is suggested for theatre-goers age 12 and above.

Tickets are available at tickets.oswego.edu or by calling Tyler box office at 312-2141. Patrons with disabilities who require assistance should call the box office to make arrangements.

SUNY Oswego Administrators Hold Tabletop Drill on H1N1 Scenario

OSWEGO — SUNY Oswego is preparing in the event that H1N1 flu, also known as swine flu, becomes widespread or severe enough to disrupt college operations.

On Monday, Patricia Egan of Oswego County’s Emergency Management Office led key college administrators in a tabletop exercise. Vice presidents and representatives of the President’s Office, Walker Health Center, Human Resources, Environmental Health and Safety, University Police and Public Affairs took part.

Considerations included addressing the possibility of a surge of cases on campus, immunization protocols, stockpiling supplies, communications and alerts, off-site instruction, cross-training, continuity of operations and suspension of classes, tuition reimbursement, case reporting procedures and coordinating with SUNY System Administration and the state and county health departments.

Monday’s exercise is one of a series of drills that have been held or are scheduled to take place on the campus to prepare for unexpected emergency events.

Earlier this month, five campus representatives took part in a SUNY symposium, “Facing a Public Health Challenge: H1N1,” in Syracuse to learn from other universities that have been challenged by the disease, including Carnegie Mellon, where cases spiked in August, and Cornell, where a 20-year-old student with underlying health issues died earlier this month. Representatives from the Centers for Disease Control, the American College Health Association, and the state Department of Health shared information regarding HINl.

SUNY Oswego has implemented flu-prevention measures widely on campus, beginning last spring and continuing this semester. As at colleges around the nation, Oswego has seen a number of students this semester with influenza-like illness presumed to be H1N1, and a few employees have reported that their personal physicians have diagnosed them with H1N1. All are recovered or recovering from this generally mild illness.

‘Sonorous Sonatas’ to Continue SUNY Oswego Music Faculty Series

OSWEGO — “Sonorous Sonatas,” the next installment in SUNY Oswego’s Faculty Artist Series concerts, will present a range of chamber music at 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 11, in the Campus Center auditorium.

The concert will feature SUNY Oswego faculty members Kristen Jorgensen on woodwinds and Rebecca Horning on piano joining chamber music vocalist Elizabeth Kesselstein. The concert will include pieces by Johann Sebastian Bach, 20th century American composer Robert Muczynski, French composers Gabriel Faure and Pierre Sancan and a flute trio by English composer Sir Henry Rowley Bishop.

“Sonorous Sonatas” is second in the five-concert Faculty Artist Series for 2009-10 highlighting the variety of talent in SUNY Oswego’s music department.

The concert is open to the public and costs $7 for adults and $5 for seniors, students and SUNY Oswego students. Parking is free on campus lots on evenings and weekends.

For more information, contact Rachel MacWhorter, the student music department intern, at 719-4335 or e-mail macwhort@oswego.edu.

Oswego Health Accepts Medical “Sharps” For Disposal at Several Locations

Oswego Health accepts approved containers of used needles and syringes, also known as sharps, at several of its facilities.

Sharps can be brought to the Oswego Hospital Health Services Center Suite G 50 and to the reception desk of The Manor at Seneca Hill, Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. excluding holidays.

The used needles and syringes can also be brought to the Urgent Care Center in Fulton during the hours of 9 a.m. and 9 p.m.

To participate in Oswego Health’s waste acceptance program, all needles, syringes, lancets, and other sharps must be placed in a puncture resistant, leak proof container. Sharps of any kind should not be stored in soda cans, coffee cans, milk cartons, glass bottles or in any containers that are not puncture resistant.

Bleach and laundry detergent bottles are an example of a recommended storage container for used sharps.

It is very important to never leave medical waste such as needles or syringes at the drop site unattended.

For more information on how to dispose of medical sharps, contact Oswego Hospital at 349-5635.

Oswego Healthcare system includes the Oswego Hospital, The Manor at Seneca Hill, a skilled nursing facility; Springside at Seneca Hill, a retirement living community; an urgent care center in Fulton, as well as health services centers in Mexico, Parish and now Phoenix. For more information, call (315) 349-5500 or visit oswegohealth.org.

The Manor Celebrates National Adult Day Health Services Week

In the photo from the left are Bill Battles, Kathy Cocciole, R.N., director of The Manor’s adult day health program; Joe Fuss, Oswego County Sheriff Reuel Todd, Donald Langdon, Maureen Annal, Oswego Health vice president and The Manor’s chief operating officer; and Paul Clark.

In the photo from the left are Bill Battles, Kathy Cocciole, R.N., director of The Manor’s adult day health program; Joe Fuss, Oswego County Sheriff Reuel Todd, Donald Langdon, Maureen Annal, Oswego Health vice president and The Manor’s chief operating officer; and Paul Clark.

The Manor at Seneca Hill held a reception and welcomed Oswego County Sheriff Reuel Todd as the afternoon’s guest speaker as part of the facility’s celebration of National Adult Day Health Services Week.

Sheriff Todd told the program participants and their family members how they can stay safe when out in the community and in their homes.

The Manor offers an adult day health program five days a week. The program provides supervised activities, nursing care, a hot meal, and door-to-door transportation. These programs enhance the lives of seniors living at home by providing a social community, along with a broad range of elder care services in one place.

Oswego Healthcare system includes the Oswego Hospital, The Manor at Seneca Hill, a skilled nursing facility; Springside at Seneca Hill, a retirement living community; an urgent care center in Fulton, as well as health services centers in Mexico, Parish and now Phoenix. For more information, call (315) 349-5500 or visit oswegohealth.org.

Oswego Health Reception Honors Retiring Richard Fiese, DMD

In the photo from the left are Oswego Health Board Chair Pam Caraccioli, Richard Fiese, DMD, and Oswego Health President and CEO Ann C. Gilpin.

In the photo from the left are Oswego Health Board Chair Pam Caraccioli, Richard Fiese, DMD, and Oswego Health President and CEO Ann C. Gilpin.

The board members of Oswego Health and Oswego Hospital, along with the Oswego Hospital medical staff recently honored retiring Richard Fiese, DMD during a reception.

Dr. Fiese, an oral maxillofacial surgeon, had been an active medical staff member for 22 years. In addition to the care he provided his patients, Dr. Fiese was also a member of the Oswego Health Board, where he served as Chair the past two years.

Oswego Healthcare system includes the Oswego Hospital, The Manor at Seneca Hill, a skilled nursing facility; Springside at Seneca Hill, a retirement living community; an urgent care center in Fulton, as well as health services centers in Mexico, Parish and now Phoenix. For more information, call (315) 349-5500 or visit oswegohealth.org.

Sheriff’s Office: 9/30/09

On 9/20/09 at 4:39 a.m., Josiah B. Russell, 21, of 51 Jonney Cake Rd., Fulton, NY was operating a 2002 Chevrolet west on SR 104 at the intersection with Franklin Ave. in the Town of Oswego, when the vehicle reportedly left the roadway and struck mailboxes belonging to 7022 and 7024 SR 104 before striking the ditch where it came to rest. Mr. Russell was issued tickets Failure to Keep Right, Leaving the Scene of a property Damage Accident and Speed Not Reasonable and Prudent.

On 9/22/09 at 6:22 a.m., Keith A. Raymond, 24, of 302 Pumphouse Rd., Mexico, NY was operating a 2008 Toyota west on Pople Ridge Rd. in the Town of Mexico when the vehicle slid through the intersection with SR 3 and collided with a 1985 Chevrolet being operated by Jason A. Shepard, 32, of 107 Lietch St., Fulton, NY causing that vehicle to spin around and strike a utility pole backwards. Mr. Shepard was taken by ambulance to Upstate Medical Center in Syracuse. Unsafe speed and failure to yield right-of-way seem to have been contributing factors.

On 9/28/09 at 9:15 a.m., Jason A. Turner, 32, of 3194 CR 176, Oswego, NY was arrested for Aggravated Unlicensed Operation of a MV, Third Degree ( two suspensions, on 6/4/09 for pending submission to court from out of state and on 7/10/09 for failure to answer summons in the C/O Oswego) and Speed in Zone following a traffic stop on Stone Ridge Rd. in the Town of Scriba. Mr. Turner was released on UTT’s, with a return to T/O Scriba Court on 10/15/09.

On 9/29/09 at 7:39 a.m., Baubak B. Gholipour-Abbasi, 25, of 978 Cayuga St., Fulton, NY was arrested based on a warrant issued by Onondaga County Court charging him with Conspiracy, Second Degree, Criminal Possession of a Controlled Substance, Third Degree and Criminal Possession of a Controlled Substance with Intent to Sell, all class B felonies. Mr. Gholipour-Abbasi was transported to Onondaga County and turned over to an Onondaga County Sheriff’s Deputy for further processing.

On 9/29/09, Shawn M. Dimura, 38, of 254 Base Bridge Rd., Williamstown, NY was arrested at 11:45 a.m. for Endangering the Welfare of a Child, a class A misdemeanor stemming from the investigation into an incident which reportedly took place on a school bus in the APW school district where she allegedly confronted a bus driver while two students were fighting. Ms. Dimura was released on an appearance ticket, returnable to the T/O Williamstown Court on 10/20/09.

On 9/29/09 at 10:20 a.m., Jason W. Clark, 34, of 406 Park Ave., Fulton, NY was arrested in the Town of West Monroe based on an arrest warrant issued by the New York State Police and the Oswego County Probation Department. Mr. Clark was turned over to the New York State Police for further processing.

On 9/29/09 at 11:22 a.m., David A. Bryant, 28, of 2961 East Main Street, Parish, NY was arrested at his residence based on a bench warrant issued by the Town of Parish Court charging him with Criminal Mischief, Fourth Degree. Mr. Bryant was arraigned in the Town of Hastings Court and ROR’d with a return to the T/O Parish Court on 10/13/09.

On 9/29/09 at 9:33 p.m., Shawn D. Doyle, 34, of Hannibal St. Bldg# 855, Fulton, NY was arrested for Aggravated Unlicensed Operation of a MV, 3rd degree and Inadequate Stop Lamps following a traffic stop at the intersection of SR 264 and Besaw Rd. in the Town of Palermo. Mr. Doyle was issued UTT’s, returnable to the T/O Palermo Court on 10/19/09.

On 9/29/09, John A. Orr, 43, of 1887 CR 7, Oswego, NY was arrested at 8:25 p.m. for Aggravated Unlicensed Operation of a MV, Second Degree and Failure to Keep Right following a traffic stop on CR 7 in the Town of Oswego. Mr. Orr was issued UTT’s, returnable to the Town of Oswego Court on 10/19/09.

[Editor's Note: The arrest report that had appeared here has been removed.  The District Attorney's office dropped all charges in this case in November, 2009, according to the court clerk's office of the town in which the initial incident occurred. This removal is in line with our policy of removing items where charges are dropped or a finding of not guilty after trial occurs. We do not remove items where there is an arrangement of Adjourned in Contemplation of Dismissal.  Such a finding does not mean the person is not guilty of the charges. And though an ACD will eventually result in a sealed court record, the record of the initial arrest will remain in police databases.  Additionally, such records may remain in the subscriber-only databases of large news services or aggregators.]

On 9/30/09 at 1:00 a.m., Mitchell D. Smith, 24, of 1302 Cloister Court, Liverpool, NY was arrested at the Oswego County Correctional Facility for Burglary, 2nd degree, a class C felony and Criminal Contempt, First Degree, a class E felony stemming from the investigation into an incident which reportedly occurred on 9/27/09 when he allegedly stole a vehicle from a T/O Hastings residence after violating a stay away order of protection of which the resident has against him. Mr. Smith was remanded back to the Oswego County Correctional Facility and will answer the charges on 10/5/09 in the T/O Hastings Court.

High Blood Pressure Is A Silent Killer; 203,946 Adults Diagnosed in CNY

SYRACUSE, NY – About one in four adults in the Central New York Region has been diagnosed with high blood pressure, a condition that if left uncontrolled can lead to crippling health problems such as strokes and heart attacks, according to a new Excellus BlueCross BlueShield report.

“We are concerned that the increasing obesity rate and the aging of our population will exacerbate this health problem in upstate New York,” said Arthur Vercillo, M.D., Excellus BlueCross BlueShield regional president. “It is important that people have their blood pressure checked and do what they can to prevent
or manage this condition.”

According to the report, High Blood Pressure Among Upstate New York Adults:

  • More than 200,000 adults in the eight-county Central New York Region have been diagnosed with high blood pressure.
  • Among the five upstate New York regions studied, high blood pressure prevalence was lowest in Central New York adults.
  • It costs about $56 million annually to treat Central New York adults who have been diagnosed with high blood pressure.

A blood pressure reading of at least 140/90 mm/Hg is high. High blood pressure can lead to a stroke, heart attack, heart or kidney failure and other health problems. Seventy-four percent of upstate New York adults with high blood pressure, for example, also have heart disease. But 27 percent of adults without high blood pressure have heart disease, according to the report.

“High blood pressure is often called the ‘silent killer’ because there are no symptoms and studies have shown that about one-third of people with this condition are unaware of it,” Vercillo said. “Having your blood pressure checked regularly is the only way to determine whether you suffer from this condition.”

The following healthy behaviors can help you control or reduce high blood pressure: exercising; maintaining a healthy weight; eating a diet rich in produce and low in saturated and total fat; reducing your salt intake; and limiting the amount of alcohol you consume.

To access the report, go to www.excellusbcbs.com and click on “Policy and Research.” The eight-county Central New York Region includes Cayuga, Cortland, Jefferson, Lewis, Onondaga, Oswego, Tompkins and St. Lawrence Counties.

Early Goals Sink Oswego State Women’s Soccer In 3-0 Loss At RIT

The Oswego State women’s soccer team was unable to overcome an early 2-0 deficit as the Lakers lost to RIT 3-0 on a chilly Tuesday afternoon in Rochester. The Tigers scored in the ninth and 17th minutes to improve to 3-3-3, while Oswego State dropped to 4-5-0 overall.

RIT’s Kristen Denninger scored at the 8:06 mark with a low shot that Laker goalkeeper Holly Lyndaker (Sr., Copenhagen, N.Y.) was unable to reach. Ashley Pezze gave the Tigers a 2-0 advantage when her shot from 18 yards out found the back of the net eight minutes later.

RIT tacked on another goal in the 65th minute when Kasey Dobrodziej scored on a corner kick play with assists going to Chelsea Shoemaker and Pezze.

In the contest, Oswego State was outshot 12-6 and only took one corner kick compared to the six taken by the Tigers. Lyndaker posted five saves in the game for the Lakers, while RIT’s Ashley Valenti and Alyssa Henkel combined to make two saves for the shutout.

Oswego State resumes SUNYAC play on Friday when it hosts Plattsburgh at 4 p.m.

Box Score: http://www.oswego.edu/athletics/teams/womens_soccer/statistics/09statistics/0929.htm

Health Educator Visits Fairgrieve Elementary

Diane Oldenberg, a Heath Educator for the Oswego County Health Department visited Fairgrieve Elementary’s Morning Express where she demonstrated to the students, using a spray bottle with water in it, how germs are spread if you don't cover your mouth when you sneeze.

Diane Oldenberg, a Heath Educator for the Oswego County Health Department visited Fairgrieve Elementary’s Morning Express where she demonstrated to the students, using a spray bottle with water in it, how germs are spread if you don't cover your mouth when you sneeze.

Diane Oldenberg, a Heath Educator for the Oswego County Health Department visited Fairgrieve Elementary’s Morning Express program recently. She talked about ways to help students and staff stay healthy – good hand washing and appropriate ways to sneeze (into your elbow or a tissue). She demonstrated to the students, using a spray bottle with water in it, how germs are spread if you don’t cover your mouth when you sneeze.

Other precautions should be taken to ensure that the spread of germs is eliminated such as washing hands often with soap and warm water for at least 20 seconds which is as long as it takes to sing Happy Birthday twice. Germs are spread through contact with the eyes, nose and mouth, so avoid touching those areas to help decrease the spread of germs. If you do get sick students should stay home from school. Do not return to school until you remain free from a fever for at least 24 hours without the use of fever-reducing medications.

Search Our Archives:

Brennan Wright

Brennan Wright was born in Oswego Hospital on April 11, 2014.

Continue reading


Zoe Marie Smith

Zoe Marie Smith was born in Oswego Hospital on April 10, 2014.

Continue reading


Karlie Anne Wardhaugh

Karlie Anne Wardhaugh was born in Oswego Hospital on April 10, 2014.

Continue reading


Local Organizations donate $3,600 to the Child Advocacy Center

Hosted by Delta Kappa Kappa, in collaboration with SUNY Oswego’s Men’s Varsity Ice Hockey team, the ‘For the Kids’ fundraiser was the culmination of a campaign created by students Denvol Haye, president of DKK, and Eli Kim Swallow, a forward on the hockey team, to raise money for the CAC and to help raise awareness of child abuse.

Continue reading


Volunteers at St. Luke Health Services Rock!

Volunteers of all ages gathered recently for a celebration in their honor at St. Luke Health Services. The theme of this year’s luncheon event, “Volunteers Rock,” transformed the Riverview Room at St. Luke into a 1950s diner.

Continue reading



v3_2012_64