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Ancient Egypt in the spotlight at Granby Elementary

A social studies unit on ancient civilizations culminated with presentations and a hallway display of projects for Granby Elementary School sixth-graders.

Students in Joe McNamara’s class studied ancient Egypt and spent nearly three weeks creating projects that depicted various aspects of Egyptian culture.

Students in Joe McNamara’s sixth grade class at Granby Elementary School display the projects they created depicting various aspects of ancient Egyptian culture. In the front row, from left, are Nathaniel Archer, Annaliese Archer and April Cardenas. In the back row, from left, are Conner Billings, Savannah Dishaw, Caleb Mount Pleasant and Emily Porter.
Students in Joe McNamara’s sixth grade class at Granby Elementary School display the projects they created depicting various aspects of ancient Egyptian culture. In the front row, from left, are Nathaniel Archer, Annaliese Archer and April Cardenas. In the back row, from left, are Conner Billings, Savannah Dishaw, Caleb Mount Pleasant and Emily Porter.

They learned about pyramids, mummification, religion and geography.

“My hope is that they took away a better understanding of how ancient Egyptians lived their daily life and what their cultural beliefs were,” McNamara said. “I was also happy to see the interest they took in understanding this ancient civilization.”

As for the actual projects, students made pyramids, maps and canopic jars.

 

 

“Many projects met and exceeded my expectations,” McNamara said. “Many students and staff were impressed as they came by to view them. I could not be more proud of my students.”

Granby Elementary School sixth graders Lei Ji Yeh, Leah O'Hanlon, Jade Schneider and Sierra Vanmeter display their ancient Egypt projects they created in connection with a social studies unit in Joe McNamara’s class.
Granby Elementary School sixth graders Lei Ji Yeh, Leah O’Hanlon, Jade Schneider and Sierra Vanmeter display their ancient Egypt projects they created in connection with a social studies unit in Joe McNamara’s class.

For McNamara, the projects – which incorporated a research component and an oral presentation – were crucial in educating students about the evolution of society.

“I think it is extremely important to learn about history because there is a connection to the world we live in today,” McNamara said. “The students are making connections from ancient cultures and how it is represented in present-day living.”