;

Career Day Introduces Phoenix Students To Different Job Sectors

Clarence Bullis tries to lift the SWAT vest of Oswego County Sheriff’s Deputy Joseph Taylor. The deputy talked to students during career day about the different gear worn by law enforcement in different situations.

Clarence Bullis tries to lift the SWAT vest of Oswego County Sheriff’s Deputy Joseph Taylor. The deputy talked to students during career day about the different gear worn by law enforcement in different situations.

PHOENIX – Emerson J. Dillon Middle School classrooms transformed into a job fair during a career exploration event today ( Nov. 16).

Clarence Bullis tries to lift the SWAT vest of Oswego County Sheriff’s Deputy Joseph Taylor. The deputy talked to students during career day about the different gear worn by law enforcement in different situations.
Clarence Bullis tries to lift the SWAT vest of Oswego County Sheriff’s Deputy Joseph Taylor. The deputy talked to students during career day about the different gear worn by law enforcement in different situations.

Phoenix students in fifth through eighth grades had the opportunity to attend three separate career day sessions where they met with employees and experts from a variety of fields.

Representatives from healthcare, law enforcement, arts, business, architecture, technology, engineering, automotive and other job sectors were available to provide first-hand insight and advice to the students as they prepare for the future.

Michael Neil learns what it takes to be an emergency medical technician during the school’s annual career day.
Michael Neil learns what it takes to be an emergency medical technician during the school’s annual career day.

“We have more than 40 people representing as many career fields as we can,” said EJD counselor Andrew Quirk. “For our fifth and sixth graders, this serves as the foundation of their exploratory search, and our seventh and eighth graders can build on their already established skills and interests.”

The event enabled students to ask questions about specific jobs and learn more about the education and skills required of certain positions.

Alyssa Kasten (left) and Kenidee Grover create artwork in a unique way after artist Dennis Pullen showed students how he paints with his mouth due to his paralysis.
Alyssa Kasten (left) and Kenidee Grover create artwork in a unique way after artist Dennis Pullen showed students how he paints with his mouth due to his paralysis.

The format of the event also allowed students to gain a thorough understanding of their desired career paths, whether it be a blue-collar or white-collar position.

“We think outside of the box and really try to bring in as many CiTi BOCES programs and local connections as we can,” Quirk said. “It’s great having current and former students come in and talk about their own experiences.”