CiTi e-NABLE Group Builds Hand for Foreigner Who Lost Limb

Team leader Tracy Fleming, at left, demonstrates a technique used in the hand-building process during a recent e-NABLE meeting at the Center for Instruction, Technology & Innovation in Mexico. From left is Fleming, student Chris Dewey, and e-NABLE team members Jay-Nel Mera and Barb Kickbush.

MEXICO — A prosthetic hand printed and meticulously assembled by a digital humanitarian group of Center for Instruction, Technology & Innovation staff will soon help a man in another country live a better quality of life.

Members of the Oswego County e-NABLE team work with a CiTi STRIVE student to assemble a 3D printed prosthetic hand during school recently. From left is student Dom Harrington and CiTi staff members Tammy Cummings and Lisa Carney.

As an official e-NABLE chapter, the group works as part of an online global community of volunteers from throughout the world that’s using 3D printers to produce free and low-cost hands and arms for children and adults in need.

“Amazing impacts for individuals in need can be made through a little dedicated effort and the desire and willingness to help others,” said Tracy Fleming, who helped organize and found the group.

The local e-NABLE group, hosted by the Oswego BOCES Teachers Association, consists of Fleming, Jay-Nel Mera, Barb Kickbush, Lisa Carney, Dave Eastman and Tammy Cummings ¬¬¬— all staff members at CiTi.

A 22-year-old man from the Dominican Republic who lost his hand in a work accident will be the first to benefit from Oswego County’s e-NABLE group.

The team in late 2019 produced the hand for a peer chapter in Maine and the Portland Rotary Club who will deliver dozens of hands to the Caribbean nation in late January.

Fleming noted the group officially formed several months ago, adding a number of team members are already certified through e-NABLE in building and threading a hand.

While learning the process, Fleming created a unique tool that helps ensure the hand stays at a 30-degree angle during threading, a critical step in the process.

Team leader Tracy Fleming, at left, demonstrates a technique used in the hand-building process during a recent e-NABLE meeting at the Center for Instruction, Technology & Innovation in Mexico. From left is Fleming, student Chris Dewey, and e-NABLE team members Jay-Nel Mera and Barb Kickbush.

In recent weeks the group has started including some students from the CiTi STRIVE program, teaching them about the methodology and process while assembling replica hands.

Carney, who recently brought students from her algebra course to work with the group, said the hope is to get more pupils involved in the 3D printing and building process. Some students may even become certified in the process through e-NABLE, she added.

Fleming thanked those who have made financial donations to help purchase materials for the effort. Donations can be made to the group via GoFundMe at: https://www.gofundme.com/f/CiTiTeachersAssociationE-NABLE

The group also noted they are happy to provide interactive demos for students and adults locally, introducing the concepts of 3D printing to make a difference in the world. To schedule a demonstration, contact the group at [email protected]

1 Comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*