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CiTi Helps Oswego Remove Blighted Houses

CiTi and the city of Oswego are teaming up to tear down dilapidated homes within the city. Pictured from left, CiTi’s Work-based Learning Coordinator Barb Rainville, Mayor Billy Barlow, CiTi’s Assistant Superintendent for Personnel Mark LaFountain, Regional Program Coordinator Marla Berlin and Business Education Liaison Garrette Weiss stand proudly in front of the first home to be demolished as part of the project.

CiTi and the city of Oswego are teaming up to tear down dilapidated homes within the city. Pictured from left, CiTi’s Work-based Learning Coordinator Barb Rainville, Mayor Billy Barlow, CiTi’s Assistant Superintendent for Personnel Mark LaFountain, Regional Program Coordinator Marla Berlin and Business Education Liaison Garrette Weiss stand proudly in front of the first home to be demolished as part of the project.

OSWEGO – Students at the Center for Instruction, Technology and Innovation are teaming up with the city of Oswego to help tear down blighted houses within the city.

CiTi and the city of Oswego are teaming up to tear down dilapidated homes within the city. Pictured from left, CiTi’s Work-based Learning Coordinator Barb Rainville, Mayor Billy Barlow, CiTi’s Assistant Superintendent for Personnel Mark LaFountain, Regional Program Coordinator Marla Berlin and Business Education Liaison Garrette Weiss stand proudly in front of the first home to be demolished as part of the project.
CiTi and the city of Oswego are teaming up to tear down dilapidated homes within the city. Pictured from left, CiTi’s Work-based Learning Coordinator Barb Rainville, Mayor Billy Barlow, CiTi’s Assistant Superintendent for Personnel Mark LaFountain, Regional Program Coordinator Marla Berlin and Business Education Liaison Garrette Weiss stand proudly in front of the first home to be demolished as part of the project.

The new partnership kicked off on Nov. 28 when students and staff from CiTi arrived at 154 E. Seneca St. to begin to demolish the building.

According to Mayor Billy Barlow, the partnership is a win-win situation.

“This partnership allows the city to remove dilapidated homes from our neighborhoods at no cost, while also giving these students the opportunity to get some hands-on training in the field,” said Barlow. “Thanks to all who helped make this partnership a reality.”

Students in the Heavy Equipment Repair and Operation program at CiTi are handling the demolish and hauling of the building, while students in the Public Safety and Justice program are providing traffic control.

Garrette Weiss, CiTi’s business education liaison, said the opportunity to demolish buildings is the ultimate example of the kind of hands-on learning CiTi offers students.

“This is as real as it gets,” Weiss said. “We are so thankful to the mayor and the city for entrusting us with this responsibility. Our students are working hard and are excited to help demolish additional homes in the city soon.”

1 Comment

  1. One of these homes is in my neighborhood. It may be remodelable, but probably not. We’ve heard rumors it was due to be knocked down. IF so, do these students have the skills to deal with what is often an older home with toxic building materials such as aesbestos and lead based paints? There are very young children in our neighborhood, and since we DO know the long-range health issues related to aesbestos, and the short-term ones relating to lead paints, what would their exposure to this be?

    I am assuming that their training includes removal of these items prior to building demolition. Also, how much insurance does the City carry for any issues with that demolition to homes adjacent or next door?

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