Go to ...
RSS Feed

September 26, 2018

CTE Programs Serve As Springboard For Future Employment


The Center for Instruction, Technology & Innovation’s Career and Technical Education programs are helping students achieve their career aspirations.

CiTi Public Safety and Justice student Tracie Murphy scales an extension ladder as part of a class activity. Murphy says her experience at CiTi has given her a solid foundation for her future.

CiTi Public Safety and Justice student Tracie Murphy scales an extension ladder as part of a class activity. Murphy says her experience at CiTi has given her a solid foundation for her future.

With an ever-changing and competitive job market, real-life experiences can make all the difference for young students who want to achieve their occupational goals.

For Pulaski Academy and Central School District junior Bailey Hilton, CTE offers the culinary expertise that will help jump start her career.

“The CTE Culinary program gives you the skills that you are going to need in the workplace, and our chefs make the kitchen a fun place,” said Hilton.

Hilton said she has always had an interest in culinary arts; her grandmother bakes wedding and birthday cakes from her home.

“With my family being in the business, cooking is something that I have always enjoyed doing growing up,” she said.

With a passion for cooking and baking, Hilton plans on attending Paul Smith’s College and majoring in culinary arts and services, which focuses on cooking and business.

She dreams of one day opening up a bar and grill.

Like Hilton, Fulton senior Tracie Murphy has already identified her career goals and aspirations.

She was introduced to the field of public safety and justice during an orientation session, and she instantly became hooked.

With a clear vision for her future, she plans on attending SUNY Oswego for psychology and working in law enforcement.

“In a regular classroom, you learn from text and books,” said Murphy. “At CiTi, you actually get to experience it firsthand.”

That kind of experiential learning is evident in the Advanced Metal Manufacturing classroom as well, where Mexico Academy and Central School District student Hunter Ouderkirk finds himself working with innovative technology on a daily basis.

His goal is to be a fabricator for Universal Metal Works in Fulton.

“I enjoy building parts,” said Ouderkirk. “I will be able to take what I learn from here and directly apply it to my job in the future.”

More Stories From Community

%d bloggers like this: