;

Fairley Elementary Students Learn Internet, Personal Safety

Pam Weaver, deputy executive director of the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children’s Rochester regional office, made a stop at Fairley Elementary School to remind children of Internet and personal safety.

Clicky the yellow robot joined Weaver in relaying tips and important information about appropriate behaviors online.

In a short video presentation, Clicky and his friends discussed how the Internet is a neat place to learn new things, but sometimes other people do not behave well.

Pam Weaver, deputy executive director of the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children’s Rochester regional office, speaks to Fairley Elementary School students during an Internet and personal safety presentation. Joining her in the background are participants of The Ride for Missing Children, which took place on Sept. 25.
Pam Weaver, deputy executive director of the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children’s Rochester regional office, speaks to Fairley Elementary School students during an Internet and personal safety presentation. Joining her in the background are participants of The Ride for Missing Children, which took place on Sept. 25.

Other online safety tips include: avoid sharing personal information, do not meet people face-to-face, and do not be rude or mean.

Weaver said if someone breaks those rules, children are encouraged to tell a trusted adult: a teacher, principal, parent, grandparent, guardian, or other role model.

Personal safety is just as important as online safety, Weaver said.

She noted that children should always check with an adult before going somewhere, take a friend when going places, tell people ‘no’ if need be, and tell a trusted adult when you feel unsafe.

Clicky the yellow robot gives Fairley students high fives after an Internet and personal safety presentation, in which included a short video he was featured in.
Clicky the yellow robot gives Fairley students high fives after an Internet and personal safety presentation, in which included a short video he was featured in.

High fives and handshakes are OK, but hugs aren’t for everyone.

“You own your own body,” Weaver said.

Her presentations were broken up by grade level, with fourth graders in their own assembly.

She encouraged appropriate-aged games, websites and applications.

The presentation was made possible thanks to funds raised for The Ride for Missing Children, a 100-mile bicycle ride in and around Syracuse, which took place on Sept. 25.

Fairley Elementary School physical education teacher Lynn Halliwell was a ride participant and invited Weaver to the school.