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Google Engineer Introduces Hannibal Students To Rewarding Career Option

HANNIBAL – To kick off this year’s Career Café at Dennis M. Kenney Middle School, nearly two dozen students recently learned about what it takes to become a Google engineer.

DMK students Darren Jamerson (left) and Christian Polhamus learn about computer coding during a Career Café presentation by Google engineer Adam Zimmerman.
DMK students Darren Jamerson (left) and Christian Polhamus learn about computer coding during a Career Café presentation by Google engineer Adam Zimmerman.

The idea behind the twice-monthly Career Café series is to introduce fifth and sixth graders to different job sectors and to encourage them to think about their future at an early age.

The initiative, launched last year, has brought in law enforcement officials, healthcare workers, licensed cosmetologists, and a variety of other people representing different sectors.

On Oct. 7, Google engineer Adam Zimmerman stopped by DMK to talk about his job and the dedication it took him to fulfill his dream working for Google.

Although Google is known for its fun and quirky job perks such as having a ball pit, a photo booth, arcade games and even a slide in the building between floors, Zimmerman noted that employees work hard to develop computer code, troubleshoot issues and design software.

Adam Zimmerman talks to Hannibal middle school students about his job as a Google engineer.
Adam Zimmerman talks to Hannibal middle school students about his job as a Google engineer.

“It is a fun job, but it is definitely hard work. We work on developing code and figuring out some pretty complex formulas every day,” Zimmerman said. “My job involves a lot of math … things I began learning at your age. The stuff you are learning now is really important later on.”

The students were captivated as Zimmerman detailed some of his daily responsibilities and the high-tech gadgets that are being developed.

They asked if there were resources they could use to explore computer coding and some students even noted that they knew about writing code from a Career Café held last year.

“Career Café is helping to create connection between the students’ passions and real-world careers,” said DMK counselor Meg Jaworski, who said she was looking forward to the additional Career Café sessions to be held throughout the school year.