Go to ...
RSS Feed

September 23, 2018

Grand Jury Returns 25 Charges; Teens Arraigned Monday


OSWEGO, NY – Three teenagers accused of killing a town of Granby man were indicted by a Grand Jury Wednesday on 25 felony charges of murder, robbery and burglary.

Upon their arrest March 3 the three young men were brought before the town of Granby court and stood accused of second degree murder, a class A-1 felony, and first degree burglary, a class B felony for their alleged involvement in the death of 46-year-old Anthony Miller.

In a March 4 letter filed with the Oswego County Supreme Court clerk’s office, District Attorney Greg Oakes urged the attorneys who were appointed to represent the teenagers that it would be in everyone’s best interest to move the cases swiftly toward the next step of New York’s legal process.

“Clearly there is enough to hold the matter over for the action of a Grand Jury,” Oakes said in his letter. “I think the media would have a field day … and I don’t think any of us want all the grizzly details out for the press right now.”

On Wednesday the findings of the secret Grand Jury proceedings were revealed when three separate indictments were filed with the Oswego County court clerk containing 19 counts and 25 felony charges against the young men.

The accused teens are Michael Celi, 17, of Baldwinsville, Glenwood Carr Jr., 16, who listed an address at Baird’s Corners in Lysander, and Zachary Scott, 19, of the town of VanBuren.

They were arrested by New York State Troopers from the Fulton barracks on March 3 after a month-long investigation into Miller’s death.

In the sworn depositions of New York State Police, investigators alleged at the time of the interviews and subsequent arrests the three confessed and in part corroborated each others’ accounts of planning to burglarize, but ultimately robbing and stabbing Miller at his home on Feb. 3.

Troopers said Celi, Carr Jr. and Scott went to Miller’s trailer the night of Super Bowl Sunday to steal “an ounce of marijuana” because Miller allegedly owed Carr Jr.’s father and uncle money.

In their depositions, investigators reported that Celi told them he struck Miller in the head with a hammer and Miller ran into the 10-inch kitchen knife that Celi brought from home.

Investigators further alleged that two of the defendants stated Scott, armed with a metal pipe, and Carr Jr., armed with a butter knife, went into Miller’s home after Celi was already inside and saw him standing over a man in the hallway.

Carr Jr. and Scott then stole marijuana, a carton of cigarettes and “smoking bongs,” and fled the scene, according to the police depositions.

Carr Jr. is alleged to have told investigators he learned the next day that Miller was dead and questioned Celi about what happened.

“He thought (Miller) might die because he was bleeding all over,” the police statement said. “Celi told me he hit Tony with a hammer … during the struggle for the knife he stabbed Tony.”

After their arrest the three young men were arraigned in the town of Granby court on felony charges of second degree murder and first degree burglary.

Once remanded to jail, the matter was turned over to the Grand Jury.

Under New York state law grand juries may take various legal actions with regard to evidence presented by the prosecutor.

Among other things, a Grand Jury can direct the removal of a case to Family Court, and they can vote an indictment – a written statement charging an individual with a felony crime.

In New York state, according to Criminal Procedure Law, a youth 16-18 years old charged with a class A-1 or A-2 felony may not be treated as a youthful offender, so if Celi or Carr Jr. are convicted of an A-1 or A-2 crime they would be treated as adults, not juveniles.

Scott is 19 years old and would be treated as an adult.

In Wednesday’s Grand Jury indictments Celi, Carr Jr., and Scott each face two separate counts of second-degree murder, a class A-1 felony under Penal Law section 125.25(3).

One count of murder alleges that during the course and commission of a burglary, one of the defendants caused the death of Miller.

The other murder count alleges that during the course and commission of a robbery, one of the defendants caused the death of Miller.

Robbery and burglary are different acts and have different definitions under New York state law.

Celi’s indictment also carries a third charge of second-degree murder, a class A-1 felony under section 125.25(1) of the Penal Law as he is alleged to have intentionally caused Miller’s death.

According to New York State Penal Law sentencing guidelines, a conviction of second degree murder carries a minimum sentence of 15 years to life, and up to 25 years to life in prison.

A person convicted of a life sentence with a minimum amount of time served is not eligible for parole until the minimum sentence is served, in this example 15 to 25 years, but could remain in prison until he or she dies.

Celi, represented by attorney Anthony DiMartino, Carr Jr. by attorney Timothy Kirwan, and Scott by attorney Joseph Rodak, are scheduled to appear before Judge Donald Todd in Oswego County Court on Monday for arraignment on the Grand Jury indictments.

Meanwhile, Celi, Carr Jr. and Scott remain jailed at the Oswego County Correctional Facility without bail.

In the separate indictments filed with the Oswego County Court Clerk on Wednesday (April 2), each of the teens was charged by the Grand Jury and will be arraigned on Monday as follows.

Michael H. Celi

Michael H. Celi

Celi faces a seven-count indictment with nine charges:

  • 1st count – PL§125.25(1) murder in the 2nd degree, a class A-1 felony;
  • 2nd count – PL§140.25(2) burglary in the 2nd degree ; and PL§125.25(3) murder in the 2nd degree, a class A-1 felony;
  • 3rd Count – PL§160.05 robbery in the 1st degree, a class B felony; and PL§125.25(3) murder in the 2nd degree, a class A-1 felony;
  • 4th Count – PL§140.30(3) burglary in the 1st degree, a class B felony;
  • 5th Count – PL§140.30(2) burglary in the 1st degree, a class B felony;
  • 6th Count – PL§160.15(3) robbery in the 1st degree, a class B felony; and
  • 7th Count – PL§160.15(1) robbery in the 1st degree, a class B felony.
Glenwood E. Carr

Glenwood E. Carr

Carr Jr. in a six-count indictment faces the following eight charges:

  • 1st Count – PL§140.25(2) burglary in the 2nd degree, and PL§125.25(3) murder in the 2nd degree, a class A-1 felony;
  • 2nd Count – PL§160.05 robbery in the 1st degree, a class B felony, and PL§125.25(3) murder in the 2nd degree, a class A-1 felony;
  • 3rd Count – PL§140.30(3) burglary in the 1st degree, a class B felony;
  • 4th Count – PL§140.30(2) burglary in the 1st degree, a class B felony;
  • 5th Count – PL§160.15(3) robbery in the 1st degree, a class B felony; and
  • 6th Count – PL§160.15(1) robbery in the 1st degree, a class B felony.
Zachary M. Scott

Zachary M. Scott

Scott’s indictment mimics Carr Jr.’s. He is also charged with:

  • 1st Count – PL§140.25(2) burglary in the 2nd degree, and PL§125.25(3) murder in the 2nd degree, a class A-1 felony;
  • 2nd Count – PL§160.05 robbery in the 1st degree, a class B felony, and PL§125.25(3) murder in the 2nd degree, a class A-1 felony;
  • 3rd Count – PL§140.30(3) burglary in the 1st degree, a class B felony;
  • 4th Count – PL§140.30(2) burglary in the 1st degree, a class B felony;
  • 5th Count – PL§160.15(3) robbery in the 1st degree, a class B felony; and
  • 6th Count – PL§160.15(1) robbery in the 1st degree, a class B felony.

More Stories From Oswego Daily News

%d bloggers like this: