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Hotter Than Average, But No Record – It Just Feels That Way!

OSWEGO, NY – It wasn’t quite a record on Tuesday, but it still was a lot hotter than average for July.

" data-medium-file="https://oswegocountytoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/102-degrees-300x483.jpg" data-large-file="https://oswegocountytoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/102-degrees-460x740.jpg" class="size-medium wp-image-92643" title="102 degrees" src="http://oswegocountytoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/102-degrees-300x483.jpg" alt="OK - maybe it is "unofficial." But, it sure didn't feel unofficial around 3 p.m. Tuesday in Scriba." width="300" height="483" srcset="https://oswegocountytoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/102-degrees-300x483.jpg 300w, https://oswegocountytoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/102-degrees-150x241.jpg 150w, https://oswegocountytoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/102-degrees-460x740.jpg 460w, https://oswegocountytoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/102-degrees-186x300.jpg 186w, https://oswegocountytoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/102-degrees.jpg 800w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" />
OK – maybe it is “unofficial.” But, it sure didn’t feel unofficial around 3 p.m. Tuesday in Scriba.

The temperature hit 93 degrees during the afternoon; the record for July 17, however, is 98 set in 1876.

It was the first 90 degree or warmer day since May 29, 2012, when it reached 90 degrees.

Meanwhile, just down the road in Fulton, the mercury reached 97 degrees at 1:54 p.m. as recorded at the Oswego County Airport.

And, six hours later hit the high for the day – 98 degrees.

The heat really isn’t the problem, health officials point out. It’s the humidity.

Last summer saw five days with 90-degree readings or higher with the highest being 95 degrees on July 21. And the summer of 2010 had three days where it hit 90 degrees (one of them was in September), and one day (also in September) where it reached 91 degrees.

Watch for signs of heat-related illness.

These signs include fainting, dizziness, headache, nausea, flushed appearance, increased heart rate, muscle cramps, vomiting and body temperature of 103 degrees or higher.

Drink lots of fluids. Avoid beverages with alcohol or caffeine.

Three-year-old Tanner Shear enjoys a swim in Lake Ontario's cool water on Tuesday afternoon.
Three-year-old Tanner Shear enjoys a swim in Lake Ontario’s cool water on Tuesday afternoon.

Wear light colored, loose fitting clothing, a hat, and waterproof sunscreen.

When taking prescription drugs, check with your physician before any prolonged exposure to the sun.

Heat-related illnesses such as heatstroke and heat exhaustion occur when your body is unable to keep itself cool. As the air temperature rises, your body stays cool through the evaporation of sweat.

When humidity is high, you feel uncomfortable because the increased moisture in the air slows the evaporation of sweat. When your body cannot cool itself, your temperature rises and you may become ill.

It took a little more coaxing to get Griffen Shear to test the waters. He finally decided to take the plunge, right in front of his "lifeguard."
It took a little more coaxing to get Griffen Shear to test the waters. He finally decided to take the plunge, right in front of his “lifeguard.”

If you experience any of the above symptoms, stop all activity immediately and go to a shady, cooler area. Remove any excess clothing and sponge your body with lukewarm water. Slowly sip water or other fluids.

If you experience any of the following symptoms, get medical help immediately:

Red, hot, dry (not sweaty) skin,

Confusion or loss of consciousness,

Frequent vomiting,

Shortness of breath/trouble breathing,

Or rapid pulse.

Forecasters are predicting July will go out with a warm spell. Temperatures in the mid to upper 80s are forecast for the remainder of this week.

Next Monday could be back in the 90s and the humidity might just stick around through Harborfest weekend.

Some didn't have to travel to the lake. Madison-Mae Wilder enjoys her pool at home in Pulaski in the hot weather. Temperatures there topped out at 93 degrees.
Some didn’t have to travel to the lake. Madison-Mae Wilder enjoys her pool at home in Pulaski in the hot weather. Temperatures there topped out at 93 degrees.

The average temperature for July is 70.8 degrees, according to Bill Gregway, local observer for the National Weather Service. It has been above that recently and the humidity makes it feel even worse, he noted.

According to the TV weather reporters, the greater Syracuse area reached 101 degrees on Tuesday, just shy of their all-time record of 102.

The month of July saw the only official triple-digit record on the books for the Port City with a reading of 100 degrees registered on July 1, 1878.

“That’s probably the only 100 we’re ever going to see, ever,” Gregway said.

In the summer of 1878 the city’s weather station was on the second floor of a building at West First and Bridge streets, where Global Buffet – Canal Commons is currently located.

They had the thermometer sitting in the west window, in the sun all day, according to Gregway.