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IBEW, Building Trades Respond To Lawsuit Against CES

SYRACUSE, NY – Today (Oct. 19), the IBEW Utility Labor Council of New York, along with the Central and Northern New York Building and Construction Trades Council and the Rochester Building and Construction Trades Council, reiterated its strong support for New York’s Clean Energy Standard (CES) and voiced their disappointment at the lawsuit filed by gas, oil and coal generators seeking to halt the implementation of the CES.

“Today’s lawsuit filed by gas, oil and  coal generators is wholly inconsistent with the values of the countless New Yorkers who want to achieve a clean energy future,” said Ted Skerpon, chair of the IBEW Utility Labor Council of New York. “For the sake of all New Yorkers, we cannot let the CES fall. It is a groundbreaking effort that will preserve countless environmental and economic benefits for our state.”

“The bottom line here is that eliminating the nuclear provision from the CES will cause electricity prices to spike and will put thousands of New Yorkers out of work,” said Gregory Lancette, president of the Central and Northern New York Building and Construction Trades Council. “It’s also critical to remember that these are solid, well-paying jobs, and let’s not forget these plants are lifelines for local community services and small businesses.”

“Ultimately, if upstate nuclear plants close, it is the generation facilities that burn coal, oil, and gas that will benefit from the electricity price spikes that would result,” said Dave Young, president of the Rochester Building and Construction Trades Council. “The profits that these other generation facilities are seeking should not outweigh the great clean air and reliability benefits of our nuclear plants, which we must continue working to preserve.”

Upstate nuclear plants support 25,000 jobs, pay $144 million in state and local taxes annually, and save New Yorkers $1.7 billion in electricity costs per year.

If these facilities were to close, New York would see 16,000,000 tons of additional GHG nearly a 50% increase over their current level and older natural gas and oil units will be dispatched at higher capacity factors.

This would be an environmental, energy, and economic loss for New York State.

Additionally, an assessment by economic consulting firm The Brattle Group found that the total benefits of preserving upstate nuclear plants through the CES far exceed the costs.