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Oswego’s Winter Parking Plan Continues To Evolve

A snowplow clears the snow on East Albany Street.

A snowplow clears the snow on East Albany Street.

In the middle of one of the hottest, driest summers in Oswego history, the Administrative Services Committee was once again focused on the city’s winter parking policy. For about an hour Monday night councilors and residents discussed concerns and possible solutions to the city winter parking problems. Currently, the plan is “a work in progress.” A final resolution has yet to be proposed.

OSWEGO, NY – In the middle of one of the hottest, driest summers in Oswego history, the Administrative Services Committee was once again focused on the city’s winter parking policy.

Two weeks ago, First Ward Councilor Caitlin Reynolds presented a tentative local law regarding winter parking. Following a lengthy discussion, the committee took no action on the item.

On Monday night, Third Ward Councilor Nate Emmons presented an updated version of the proposal.

Once again, after a lengthy discussion, the committee took no action.

“This is a work in progress,” Emmons said, adding that no matter what the council finally approves, not everyone will be happy with it.

The current plan is for a ban in effect from November 15 through March 31. The mayor, at his or her discretion, can initiate the ban earlier or extend it based on weather conditions.

It calls for no parking on city streets from 12 a.m. to 6 a.m. in residential areas; for downtown, 2 – 6 a.m.

Permits (exceptions) would be granted based on demonstrated need for parking on the street. The permit fee would be $125. The permits would be exclusive for the purchaser’s property.

And, municipal lots would be available for overnight parking for excess vehicles.

“This is not necessarily the final resolution,” Emmons pointed out. “We just want to give the public a sense of what we’re working on and get their input.”

Some people have suggested various options; they point out that a certain city does things this way and another city does this and this is how another city does it.

“We’re a different city with a different makeup,” Emmons pointed out. “We’re trying to figure out what works here.”

It wouldn’t be prudent to move to some big bold policy right off the bat, he said.

However, some residents had concerns about the city’s proposal.

One westside questioned whether the rentals in her area would be able to get permits, and have many cars parked on the street.

Another resident said he was unaware of a parking ban.

Council President Shawn Walker noted that several large signs regarding the city’s winter parking ban are posted around the city.

One resident noted that college students returning from Christmas break are unaware the parking ban has started and that causes problems.

Another resident asked where the municipal lots were that people could utilize.

A list of the lots will be included in the final plan.

“This is a work in progress,” chairman Robert Corradino said. “We’re trying to make this work, we can compromise. If something isn’t working, we can tweak it.”

The wards are all different and have their own parking and plowing issues, Walker said, adding the committee will continue to work on a policy that is the best for the entire city.

2 Comments

  1. I hope the council takes into consideration that the neighborhood’s that were allowed to put five unrelated people in a rental also have the narrowest streets. From what I have read there seems to be the feeling that only those who live in the high rental area’s like the first ward will suffer the on street parking.

  2. So how is CHARGING $125 for a permit going to help? Good lord I almost choked on my water while reading this. Lesson learned….Never eat or drink anything while reading what the Council has to say.

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