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September 24, 2018

Take A Visual Tour of Fulton’s New Logo


The text is red, with a while outline and green drop shadow. The "F" is decorated with the Onondaga Nation gustoweh (headdress), which is signified by the single feature pointing up and a single feather pointing down. The "F" can be broken off for use on caps and patches. The "F" also has arrowheads inside it pointing up and down, simulating the direction of the feathers in the gustoweh. Designer Ben Jerred said one version of the design had arrowheads in all of the letters, but it made the design too busy.

The text is red, with a while outline and green drop shadow. The "F" is decorated with the Onondaga Nation gustoweh (headdress), which is signified by the single feature pointing up and a single feather pointing down. The "F" can be broken off for use on caps and patches. The "F" also has arrowheads inside it pointing up and down, simulating the direction of the feathers in the gustoweh. Designer Ben Jerred said one version of the design had arrowheads in all of the letters, but it made the design too busy.

The tomahawk, decorated on its blade with the Fulton block letter "F", is crafted in the Iroquois style, with a leather-wrapped handle. It is held aloft in a manner that suggests defensive use, not offensive use, of the weapon.

The tomahawk, decorated on its blade with the Fulton block letter "F", is crafted in the Iroquois style, with a leather-wrapped handle. It is held aloft in a manner that suggests defensive use, not offensive use, of the weapon.

The Onondaga man wears traditional elbow clasps.

The Onondaga man wears traditional elbow clasps.

He stands in the waters of Lake Neatahwanta. Onondaga tribal members often migrated north from their main reserve to Lake Neatahwanta in the summer to enjoy strong hunting and fishing. The small ripples on the water suggest he is not moving; this makes him a figure of stability and steadfastness.

He stands in the waters of Lake Neatahwanta. Onondaga tribal members often migrated north from their main reserve to Lake Neatahwanta in the summer to enjoy strong hunting and fishing. The small ripples on the water suggest he is not moving; this makes him a figure of stability and steadfastness.

The vest includes the wampum belt insignia of Chief Hiawatha. The outlined rectangles symbolize the Six Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy. They are linked to each other and to the central image, the Great Tree of Peace. The vest is open at the center to reveal strong muscles.

The vest includes the wampum belt insignia of Chief Hiawatha. The outlined rectangles symbolize the Six Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy. They are linked to each other and to the central image, the Great Tree of Peace. The vest is open at the center to reveal strong muscles.

Logo co-creator Rob Lescarbeau, who is descended from Canadian Cree indians, spent years researching native customs and life. Once the logo design was underway, he spent time at a museum in New York City. There, he studied masks made from the skulls of Native Americans of the era. That knowledge went into the design of the man's face. It is neither old nor young, but suggests experience and wisdom. It has the high cheekbones and broad nose still seen among Iroquois tribal members. His face is turned slightly upwards, into the sun.

Logo co-creator Rob Lescarbeau, who is descended from Canadian Cree indians, spent years researching native customs and life. Once the logo design was underway, he spent time at a museum in New York City. There, he studied masks made from the skulls of Native Americans of the era. That knowledge went into the design of the man's face. It is neither old nor young, but suggests experience and wisdom. It has the high cheekbones and broad nose still seen among Iroquois tribal members. His face is turned slightly upwards, into the sun.

He wears a gustoweh that identifies him as a member of the Onondaga Nation; one feather is up and one is down and to the side. The number and arrangement of feathers on the gustoweh helped identify the wearer as a member of the Iroquois Confederacy and the tribe to which they belonged.

He wears a gustoweh that identifies him as a member of the Onondaga Nation; one feather is up and one is down and to the side. The number and arrangement of feathers on the gustoweh helped identify the wearer as a member of the Iroquois Confederacy and the tribe to which they belonged.

In his left hand, he holds six arrows. The six arrows signify the Six Nations of the Iroquois. They also signify the six schools of the Fulton City School District.

In his left hand, he holds six arrows. The six arrows signify the Six Nations of the Iroquois. They also signify the six schools of the Fulton City School District.

Six trees line the shore of the lake. In this logo, the number six stands for the Six Nations tribes and also the six schools of the district.

Six trees line the shore of the lake. In this logo, the number six stands for the Six Nations tribes and also the six schools of the district.

The sky behind our man is red; he is not. Logo co-creator Rob Lescarbeau says that was a deliberate choice to get away from the offensive stereotype of a "red man" when the skin tone of native people in this area is similar to that of non-natives.

The sky behind our man is red; he is not. Logo co-creator Rob Lescarbeau says that was a deliberate choice to get away from the offensive stereotype of a "red man" when the skin tone of native people in this area is similar to that of non-natives.

The logo shows our man's arms extending outside the red circle. He is, the logo creators say, "breaking free of the existence that is Fulton".

The logo shows our man's arms extending outside the red circle. He is, the logo creators say, "breaking free of the existence that is Fulton".

The full logo. Because it is an original drawing, the district can copyright the image. It could not copyright its prior logo.

The full logo. Because it is an original drawing, the district can copyright the image. It could not copyright its prior logo.

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