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Philip R. ‘Jocko’ Reitz, 78

OSWEGO, NY – Philip R. “Jocko” Reitz, 78, a resident of Oswego, passed away Friday October 17, 2014, at Oswego Hospital.

Born in Oswego, he was the son of the late Philip and Laura (Corradino) Reitz.

Philip R. ‘Jocko’ Reitz

Philip R. ‘Jocko’ Reitz

He was the owner and operator of the Ritz Diner.

Surviving are his son, Philip R. Reitz Jr.; his mother, Cynthia J. Rollin; many nieces and nephews.

He was predeceased by his sisters, Rose Spinelli, Betty Torres, Mary Ann Haynes and Dorothy Scaccia.

Funeral services will be held 10 a.m. Friday at St. Joseph’s Church.

Burial will be at St. Peter’s Cemetery.

Calling hours will be held 3-7 p.m. Wednesday and 3-7 p.m. Thursday at the Nelson Funeral Home, 11 W. Albany St., Oswego.

Donations can be made to the Oswego County United Way.

Online condolences may be made at www.nelson-funeralhome.com

With Winter Approaching, Fulton Police Remind Motorists To Follow The Rules of the Road

FULTON, NY – With winter weather approaching and the snowy and slippery road conditions that go with it, the Fulton Police Department wants to remind motorists to follow the rules of the road.

Some of the following reminders should be common sense, others may be confusing or unknown to some motorists.

The most obvious of those rules in bad road conditions is to make sure motorists leave enough space between vehicles when driving.

There is no clearly defined distance or formula to determine what a safe distance is, but a number of factors need to be weighed.

The New York State Vehicle and Traffic Law states, “The driver of a motor vehicle shall not follow another vehicle more closely than is reasonable and prudent, having due regard for the speed of such vehicles and the traffic upon and the condition of the roadway.”

In other words, drivers are expected to leave more room when the speed of traffic is faster, when the volume of traffic is heavier and when the road conditions are more hazardous such as wet or snow and ice covered roads.

The combination of slippery road conditions and being distracted, especially by talking on a cell phone or texting, greatly increases the chances of being involved in a crash, especially rear-end collisions.

Another obvious rule is, when stopped at a traffic signal only begin moving again when your light turns green and the vehicles in front of you begin moving.

At multi-lane intersections, the turning lane sometimes receives an advanced green arrow while the straight lane still has a red light.

It is too often seen that a motorists sees the traffic begin to move beside them and they instinctively begin to move as well only to find that their light has not turned and they have run into the back of the vehicle in front of them.

This is a particular problem for northbound traffic on State Route 481 at State Route 3.

One of the rules that motorists are sometimes unaware of is that when turning at a multi-lane intersection you must turn into your closest lane.

This seems to be a particular problem again at State Route 481 at State Route 3 and also for traffic turning onto the Broadway Bridge.

Turning into the closest lane, instead of making a wider turn into the further lane, allows for vehicles to turn from opposite directions at the same time and helps facilitate smoother moving traffic.

The other rule that has been found to cause traffic backups and hazards is motorists proceeding into an intersection controlled by a traffic signal when the traffic in front of them is not moving.

When this happens vehicles can become trapped in the middle of an intersection blocking traffic in all directions.

This had been a big problem during the Broadway Bridge construction when traffic was more congested; but it still continues to be a problem.

A vehicle may have a green light however if the traffic is not moving ahead of them and they enter the intersection they may block the intersection when the light for the other direction of traffic turns green.

This can completely block the intersection and no traffic can move.

Signs have been put in place on State Route 481 and Oneida Street stating “Do Not Block Side Roads” as a reminder to motorists however the problem continues there and at other intersections in the city.

These four examples are all violations of the New York State Vehicle and Traffic Law however more importantly they are driving behaviors that increase the chance of vehicle crashes and injuries.

These are especially dangerous behaviors when the roads are slippery with snow and ice and vehicles have worse steering and stopping capabilities.

As always, please take your time on our roadways and drive carefully.

Emmons, Lucas named as Community Champions for October

OSWEGO, NY – In keeping with October’s theme of Breast Cancer Awareness, Recognizing Oswego County has selected two Community Champions who are active in the fight against cancer in Oswego County.

The Community Champions for October are Carl Emmons and Liz Lucas.

ROC members with October Community Champions Liz Lucas and Carl Emmons. From left, front row: Carl Emmons III, Kiley Emmons, Layla Emmons.  Back Row: Carolyn Handville, Liz Lucas, Penny Morley, Brian Coleman, Brandon Morey, Susan Emmons and Carl Emmons.

ROC members with October Community Champions Liz Lucas and Carl Emmons. From left, front row: Carl Emmons III, Kiley Emmons, Layla Emmons. Back Row: Carolyn Handville, Liz Lucas, Penny Morley, Brian Coleman, Brandon Morey, Susan Emmons and Carl Emmons.

“Carl and Liz exemplify what ROC is all about,” said ROC co-chair Brandon Morey.  “They give their time and energy to a cause that is larger than themselves for the good of the community.  ROC is thrilled to highlight their efforts and encourages everyone to look around for others who are making a difference.  They are everywhere; you just have to look.”

Recognizing Oswego County focuses on the positive efforts that are being made in the community.

Each month ROC uses this recognition effort as a platform for emphasizing the wonderful work that is happening in Oswego County to promote the health and wellness of children, families and adults.

Emmons is a firefighter with the Oswego City Fire Department.

Inspired several years ago by his son’s interest in the pink that the NFL players were wearing, Emmons signed the OCFD up as a local participant in the International Association of Fire Fighters’ nationwide breast cancer awareness campaign and has been selling pink T-shirts as a fundraiser.

Wanting to keep the funds local, Emmons chose to donate the proceeds of the T-shirt sale to Oswego County Opportunities’ Cancer Services Program, which provides free cancer screenings for the uninsured.

Emmons’ efforts are a family affair.

His wife, Susan, helps out and his son, Carl III, recently painted his go-cart pink and raced it to raise awareness.

T-shirts are available from the OFD until the end of the month, while supplies last.

Call the fire station at 343-2161 for more information.

Lucas is a cancer survivor and is currently in total remission.

Having been through chemotherapy and being a salon specialist at Hair We Are in Fulton, Lucas knows how difficult it can be to lose hair and eyebrows.

“Eyebrows are the hardest, because they help define the face,” Lucas said.

In order to help those going through cancer treatment, Lucas provides free haircuts, wig fittings and make up application, including how to draw on eyebrows.

These services can provide confidence and help find a sense of normalcy during a very difficult time.

If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with cancer, call her at 529-0542 to set up an appointment.

ROC would also like to thank Carolyn Handville of OCO’s Cancer Services Program and Sara Gozzi from OCO’s SAF Domestic Violence Prevention Program for presenting at their meeting on October 9.

October is also Domestic Violence Prevention month and Gozzi shared some of her program’s work to increase awareness and prevent domestic violence in Oswego County.

Gozzi noted, “Many people know about our hotline which can be reached at 342-1600.  We want the community to know that the hotline is not only for victims, but also for friends, co-workers and loved ones who know someone who is being abused and want to help.”

Each month, ROC selects a theme and invites guest speakers to share the good work they are doing.

Nominations are also solicited for Community Champions.

For the month of November, Recognizing Oswego County is seeking nominations in the area of Senior Support.

A potential nominee might be an individual that provides companionship to homebound seniors or coordinates activities for nursing home residents.

Nominations are due by November 5.

The nomination form is available on the ROC Facebook page or by contacting bmorey@oswegocounty.com

ROC members include representatives from a broad range of community organizations as well as individual community members.  New members are welcome.

Monthly meetings are held from 8-9:15 am on the second Thursday of the month.

The November meeting will be held at SUNY Oswego’s Rice Creek.

Tales From the Netherlands: Montreal’s Mystery is revealed at last

By Len Senecal
While progressive rock may stand as a bad word in some sectors of the sonic world, the Dutch have always harbored a special affinity for this extended and cerebral brand of music. So it comes as no surprise that the stars aligned themselves perfectly on May 10, 2013, when Montreal based prog-rock band Mystery took to the stage of the Boerderij Cultuurpodium in Zoetermeer, Netherlands.

Mystery live

Mystery live

The end result is the group’s first-ever live release, Tales from the Netherlands, an astounding ride through the band’s recent catalogue that could also serve as the perfect jumping on point for the uninitiated.

Featuring tracks from their albums The World is a Game, Beneath the Veil of Winter’s Face and One Among the Living, guitarist/songwriter Michel St-Pere and company charge through an evening’s worth of excellence spotlessly captured for all to hear.

With traces of progressive giants Yes and Marillion along with touches of fellow Canadians Rush and the better elements of Styx, Mystery are able to accomplish something that many prog bands seek to achieve but often fall short of: originality. Lead singer Benoit David, whom some may remember from his stint with Yes, is just one of the factors placing Mystery in a progressive class all its own.

Amply backed by bassist Francois Fournier, guitarist Sylvain Moineau, keyboards player Benoit Dupuis and the thundering percussion of Jean-Sebastien Goyette, David and St-Pere have crafted a sound reminiscent of the progressive greats, but uniquely owned by Mystery.

Most impressive are the 22-minute-plus epic “Through Different Eyes” and the show-stopping rendition of “Another Day,” the two longest tracks on the album. Every element of the band’s complex sound is captured well with each member enjoying his moment, but never overwhelming the group’s overall presentation.

And while this may not seem like a major accomplishment, given the complexity of the music it stands as a testament to their talent that Mystery are able to replicate and even surpass the original studio versions in every case.

David, who has since left the band, is joined by the crowd on the opening a cappella vocals of “Wolf,” and the beauty of his voice is also showcased well on songs such as “Dear Someone” and “As I Am.” Synchronized guitar and bass parts dominate “Travel to the Night” from their One Among the Living LP, and the band shows that it can turn up the intensity without losing fidelity on “Pride” and a driving version of “The Preacher’s Fall.”

Coming full circle during their recent visit to Europe, Tales from the Netherlands made its world debut in September at the very venue where it was recorded.

And even though David is no longer with them, Mystery showed that it has not missed a beat during the August debut of new lead singer Jean Pageau in Ottawa, which can only mean good things heading forward for the Mysterions.

The album is available through on-line services such as i-tunes, but for those who prefer physical ownership of a CD it may also be ordered directly through the band itself at their website: therealmystery.com

And for those willing to take a chance on a somewhat unknown band the benefits will far outweigh the risks.

You’ll find yourself realizing that the real mystery is how this group from Canada has not become a household name in the world of progressive rock.

Doris Barden, 72

FULTON, NY – Doris Ann Barden, 72, of Fulton, passed away Friday October 17, 2014, at Upstate University Hospital, Syracuse, with her family by her side.

She was born January 6, 1942, in Fulton, to the late Thomas and Pauline Ellis Carr.

Doris was a member of North Volney Methodist Church and of the Fulton VFW.

Her hobbies were playing Bingo and doing her crafts.

Doris was predeceased by her sister, Betty Thrasher, in 1986.

She will be greatly missed and forever loved by her four siblings, Nancy (Richard) Scott of Fulton, Janet (William) Ruby of Mexico, Thomas Carr of New Haven and Barbara (Harry) Sullivan of Fulton; as well as several nieces and nephews.

Services will be held privately.

Burial will be in North Volney Cemetery.

Arrangements are in the care of Foster Funeral Home in Fulton.

Foster Funeral Home, Inc.

fosterfuneralhome.com

Local Agencies Work to Improve Literacy

By Assemblyman Will Barclay
In 1961, Ruth Colvin, a resident of Central New York, read an article in the newspaper claiming that more than 11,000 people in her town were unable to read.

Shocked by this information, Ms. Colvin decided to take it upon herself to do something about it. It was defining moment for Ms. Colvin and her life’s work.

She pioneered Literacy Volunteers of America, a program providing literacy tutoring to adults.

Her decision to act was also a defining moment for the literacy movement in our country as well as around the globe.

Fifty-three years later, the need to improve literacy still exists in our country and our community.

According to ProLiteracy, there are more than 36 million Americans who cannot read over a third-grade level.

Low literacy rates have serious implications for families, communities and the economy.

It impacts all aspects of an individual’s life, from their health, employment opportunities, financial decisions and their quality of life.

Studies have determined that low-level literacy rates attribute to higher healthcare costs, higher unemployment and economic instability.

A person’s literacy ability can mean the difference between giving a child the correct dose of medication or following proper safety procedures while on a job.

It can also determine your financial stability.

According to recent statistics, 43 percent of those who have low literacy skills lived in poverty.

Clearly, literacy is empowerment.

A person’s ability to read can change the trajectory of their life and those around them.

Fortunately, there are adult literacy programs throughout our region that provide services for those in need and also advocate and raise awareness about its importance.

One place where people can often find classes or programs are at your local library.

Libraries are no longer just places to read and take out books and other materials.

They have transformed into educational centers and many offer a variety of classes to assist adults with computer and financial literacy, job applications or other needs.

If a person needs more specialized attention to improve their reading skills, there are organizations such as Literacy Volunteers of Oswego County, Literacy of Northern New York and Literacy CNY.

These programs match tutors with adults and they work on individualized literacy goals.

This one-on-one approach works.  I have heard many stories from individuals who received services.

While each story is unique they all have the underlying theme of how reading has transformed their lives in powerful and profound ways.

In addition to the efforts being made to improve literacy rates among adults, there are many initiatives that are focused on improving literacy among our children.

Encouraging children to read at an early age helps build a lifelong love of learning and reading.

The link between literacy levels and a person’s quality of life is closely intertwined.

That is why getting our young people engaged early is so important.

Our schools and libraries do a great job promoting reading and offer many reading incentives and challenges throughout the year.

Because literacy is important to me, I sponsor an annual Summer Reading Challenge.

Studies show that students who read leisurely over the summer months perform better in school when they return in the fall.

This year’s theme Fizz, Boom, Read! focused on science and technology and children had to read 15 minutes a day for 40 days throughout the summer to complete the challenge.

To celebrate all my participants, I held a Summer Reading Challenge party at the Oswego Public Library a few weeks ago to celebrate their accomplishment.

I enjoyed hearing from the kids about their favorite books and meeting the families.

The children were visibly proud of their accomplishment and it is great to reward them for a job well done.

This is the goal of this program, building lifelong readers, one at a time.

If you or someone you know who is in need of adult literacy services, please feel free to contact the following organizations: In Jefferson County, contact Literacy of Northern New York at 315-782-4270, for Oswego County, contact Literacy Volunteers of Oswego County 315-342-8839 or in Onondaga County contact, Literacy CNY at 315-471-1300.

If you have any questions or comments on this or any other state issue, or if you would like to be added to my mailing list or receive my newsletter, please contact my office.

My office can be reached by mail at 200 N. Second St., Fulton, NY 13069, by e-mail at barclaw@assembly.state.ny.us or by calling (315) 598-5185.

Irene L. King, 74

HANNIBAL, NY – Irene L. King, 74, formerly of Sterling, passed away on Monday, October 13, 2014, at Cayuga Medical Center in Ithaca, after a long illness.

A native of Sterling, she was the daughter of the late Walter and Gladys Gray King.

Irene lived in Cortland for the past 17 years.

She retired as a rural mail carrier for the Sterling, NY, Post Office and she had previously worked at Syroco in Baldwinsville.

Irene enjoyed gardening, outdoor activities and travelling.

She was a volunteer for RSVP, the Cortland Regional Medical Center and employee store.

Surviving are her two sisters, Evelyn Kyle and Catherine Shortslef, both of Sterling; and several nieces and nephews.

Graveside services will be 10 a.m. Saturday, October 25, at Springbrook Cemetery, Route 104A in Sterling.

Foster Funeral Home, Hannibal has care of arrangements.

Foster Funeral Home, Inc.

www.fosterfuneralhome.com

Cop Logs: Sheriff’s Office 10/20/2014

On 10/14/14 at 10:50 a.m., Sharon A. Silver, 59, of 68 Lock St., Phoenix, was issued tickets for No Inspection Certificate and Aggravated Unlicensed Operation, Third Degree (license suspended on 10/07/12 for Failure to Answer Summons from the Town of Clay and on 5/01/12 for Failure to Answer a Summons in the Town of Lysander), during a road safety checkpoint detail established on SR 3 in the town of Palermo.
Ms. Silver is scheduled to answer the charge before Town of Palermo Court on 10/20/14.

On 10/14/14 at 10:53 p.m., Christian A. Earl, 18, of 3388 Maple Ave., Pulaski, was charged with Insufficient Tail Lamps and Aggravated Unlicensed Operation, Third Degree (license suspended on 8/07/2014 for failure to answer a summons in the Town of Sandy Creek), following a traffic stop on Maple Avenue in the village of Pulaski.
Mr. Earl was issued tickets returnable to Town of Richland Court on 11/06/14.

On 10/17/14 at 9:59 a.m., Angela L. Hamlin, 34, of 24 Parkhurst Road, 2, Oswego, was operating a 2011 Nissan eastbound on SR 104 in the town of Scriba when she reportedly rear-ended an eastbound 2012 Chevrolet suburban driven by M.A. Attenborough, 63, of 81 E. Ninth St., Oswego.
The incident occurred 200 feet west of CR 53 as Ms. Attenborough was stopped in traffic at a construction zone that was limiting the road to one lane.
Ms. Hamlin was issued a ticket for Following Too Closely.

On 10/17/14 at 11:30 p.m., Amber L.Wilmott, 21, of 4 Catherine St., Oswego, was arrested for Promoting Prison Contraband, Second Degree, a class A misdemeanor, after she allegedly brought body piercing jewelry and hair ties in a plastic bag hidden within her body into the Oswego County Correctional Facility.
Ms. Wilmott was issued an appearance ticket and is scheduled to answer the charge before Oswego City Court on 10/28/14.

On 10/18/14 at midnight, Charles L. Carter, 28, of 235 Main St., Apt. A, Richland, was taken into custody based on a bench warrant issued by Town of Richland Court.
Mr. Carter was arraigned before Town of Parish Court and released on his own recognizance.
He is scheduled to appear before Town of Richland Court on 10/20/14.

On 10/18/14 at 8:19 a.m., George M. Wise II, 43, of 251 S. Sixth St., Fulton, was taken into custody based on a Family Court Warrant.
Mr. Wise was arraigned before Town of Oswego Court and remanded to the Oswego County Correctional Facility in lieu of $500 cash bail or $5,000 bail bond.
He is scheduled to appear before Oswego County Family Court on 10/20/14.

On 10/18/14 at 6:29 p.m., Charles L. Carter, 28, of 235 Main St., Apt. A, Richland, was arrested based on a bench warrant issued by Oswego City Court.
Mr. Carter was turned over to a member of the Oswego City Police Department for further processing.

On 10/19/14, Gregory H. Breslin, 39, of 191 CR 13, Lacona, David W. Dillabough, 32, of 25 Rocking Horse Lane, Sandy Creek, and Kaitlyn A. Peabody, 30 of 3996 Port St., Pulaski, were each arrested for Criminal Possession of Marijuana, First Degree, a class C felony, and Unlawful Growing of Cannabis, a class A misdemeanor.
They were allegedly participating in a marijuana grow operation conducted in the town of Sandy Creek.
Each was arraigned before Town of Sandy Creek Court and remanded to the Oswego County Correctional Facility, Mr. Breslin in lieu of $2,500 cash bail or $5,000 bail bond and Mr. Dillabough and Ms. Peabody each in lieu of $1,000 cash bail or $2,000 bail bond.
They are each scheduled to return to court on 11/06/14.

On 10/19/14 at 10:30 a.m., a 17-year-old girl residing in the town of Constantia, was arrested for Assault, Third Degree, a class A misdemeanor, following an incident that occurred at Oswego County BOCES on 10/17/14.
She allegedly caused physical injury to a 16-year-old boy victim by hitting him in the face, causing bruising and swelling to his eye.
The girl was issued an appearance ticket returnable to Town of Mexico Court on 11/11/14.

Oswego AmeriCorps Members Work with DSS to Help Homeless Population

OSWEGO – Due to the growing homeless population in Oswego County, the Oswego County Department of Social Services has partnered with the Oswego City-County Youth Bureau, Oswego County Opportunities, and Catholic Charities to utilize AmeriCorps members under the Economic Opportunity Program to help provide homeless services for many at-risk individuals.

The program began earlier this fall.

“Since Oswego County has no homeless shelters, it is imperative that we coordinate services with community partners to provide cohesive case management to individuals in need,” said Gidget Stevens, director of assistance programs for the County Department of Social Services.

AmeriCorps members Mike Butler, Jamie Colvin and Sonja Henson are currently serving at the Oswego County DSS working with individuals in need of housing.

They assist customers on their housing search, connect them with different landlords and provide them with helpful information, including referrals to OCO or Catholic Charities for further assistance.

AmeriCorps members address critical needs in communities all across America.

Each year, AmeriCorps offers 75,000 opportunities for adults of all ages and backgrounds to serve through a network of partnerships with local agencies and national nonprofit groups.

Members experience the tremendous reward that comes from helping others.

They gain career skills while receiving a modest living allowance and earning an education award to help pay for college or pay back qualified student loans.

Visit AmeriCorps.gov for more information.

Oswego AmeriCorps is currently accepting applications for the fall 2014-2015 program year.

Site opportunities are located around the county including DSS, OCO, and Catholic Charities.

Each site has its own educational and experience requirements.

Applications can be found at http://www.oswegocounty.com/youth/Americorps.html

http://www.oswegocounty.com/youth/Americorps.html

For more information, contact Kathy Andolina at 315-349-3451 or email Kathleen@oswegocounty.com

Search Our Archives:

Philip R. ‘Jocko’ Reitz, 78

Philip R. “Jocko” Reitz, 78, a resident of Oswego, passed away Friday October 17, 2014, at Oswego Hospital.

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With Winter Approaching, Fulton Police Remind Motorists To Follow The Rules of the Road

With winter weather approaching and the snowy and slippery road conditions that go with it, the Fulton Police Department wants to remind motorists to follow the rules of the road. Some of the following reminders should be common sense, others may be confusing or unknown to some motorists. The most obvious of those rules in bad road conditions is to make sure motorists leave enough space between vehicles when driving.

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Emmons, Lucas named as Community Champions for October

In keeping with October’s theme of Breast Cancer Awareness, Recognizing Oswego County has selected two Community Champions who are active in the fight against cancer in Oswego County. The Community Champions for October are Carl Emmons and Liz Lucas.

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Tales From the Netherlands: Montreal’s Mystery is revealed at last

While progressive rock may stand as a bad word in some sectors of the sonic world, the Dutch have always harbored a special affinity for this extended and cerebral brand of music. So it comes as no surprise that the stars aligned themselves perfectly on May 10, 2013, when Montreal based prog-rock band Mystery took to the stage of the Boerderij Cultuurpodium in Zoetermeer, Netherlands. The end result is the group’s first-ever live release, Tales from the Netherlands, an astounding ride through the band’s recent catalogue that could also serve as the perfect jumping on point for the uninitiated.

Continue reading


Safety Expo shines despite rainy weather

Dreary fall weather couldn’t keep the Phoenix community indoors on Saturday, as hundreds ventured into the cold for the Safety Expo. For the better part of a decade, the Phoenix Central School District Transportation Department has organized the event, which unites students, community members and local agencies for a day of safety and fun.

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