;

Oswego Health Surgical Services Staff Earns Prestigious CNOR Certification

Pictured seated from left, Catherine Bulger, Shannon Campbell and Teresa Traspasso. Standing are Jody Wood, Terri Lutz, RoseMarie Rockwell, Lorrie Galletta, Karen Damico and Lauren Miles. Missing from the photo was Brandi Leaf.
Pictured seated from left, Catherine Bulger, Shannon Campbell and Teresa Traspasso. Standing are Jody Wood, Terri Lutz, RoseMarie Rockwell, Lorrie Galletta, Karen Damico and Lauren Miles. Missing from the photo was Brandi Leaf.

OSWEGO – Oswego Health’s surgical services nursing staff members have earned the most prestigious certification awarded to the specialty.

Pictured seated from left, Catherine Bulger, Shannon Campbell and Teresa Traspasso. Standing are Jody Wood, Terri Lutz, RoseMarie Rockwell, Lorrie Galletta, Karen Damico and Lauren Miles. Missing from the photo was Brandi Leaf.
Pictured seated from left, Catherine Bulger, Shannon Campbell and Teresa Traspasso. Standing are Jody Wood, Terri Lutz, RoseMarie Rockwell, Lorrie Galletta, Karen Damico and Lauren Miles. Missing from the photo was Brandi Leaf.

A group of ten Oswego Health registered nurses, who provide care in Oswego Hospital’s technologically-advanced surgery center have earned the respected CNOR certification.

As the only accredited credentialing program for perioperative registered nurses, CNOR certification is the gold standard.

Earning the CNOR credential is a mark of distinction and a highly sought after personal as well as professional accomplishment.

The CNOR credentialing program is for perioperative nurses interested in enhancing as well as validating their specialized knowledge and skills.

CNOR certified nurses are committed to providing the highest quality care to their surgical patients.

“For our department, this is actually groundbreaking,” said Surgical Services Director Shannon Campbell. “Few, if any surgical departments, regardless of their size, have a staff where a majority of the registered nurses have earned this certification.”

Ten of the department’s registered nurses have earned certification as a CNOR.

Campbell said the certification translates to better patient care.

“Our patients benefit as it signifies that the staff provides a higher level of care and that they possess a deeper knowledge of evidenced-based practices,” she said.

To be eligible for the prestigious certification, registered nurses must be currently working in perioperative nursing in the area of nursing education, administration, research or clinical practice.

They are further required to have completed a minimum of two years and 2,400 hours of experience in perioperative nursing, with a minimum of 50 percent in the intraoperative setting.

Once they achieve the requirements they can sit for a 200-multiple choice examination that covers nine related subject areas.

The letters, CNOR are not an acronym, but rather indicate that an individual has demonstrated the knowledge and skills that denote competency in the specialized field of perioperative nursing.

CNOR certified nurses are committed to providing the highest quality care to their surgical patients and possess a have a greater confidence in their practice.

Those RNs that have mastered perioperative nursing standards also promote a culture of professionalism and improve patient outcomes. Certification is a compass for directing a RNs clinical practice toward national standards of surgical care. These RNs and the organizations that are committed to improving outcomes look to certification as a measure of mastery.

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*