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National Technical Honor Society welcomes 160 BOCES students

Surrounded by a standing-room-only crowd of friends and family members, Oswego County BOCES Career and Technical Education students were recently recognized for their commitment to their schoolwork and for their exemplary citizenship and service outside of the classroom.

During the recent National Technical Honor Society induction ceremony, Koti Turner, an Oswego County BOCES Public Safety and Justice student, lights a candle to signify one of the seven attributes required for membership in the organization.

During the recent National Technical Honor Society induction ceremony, Koti Turner, an Oswego County BOCES Public Safety and Justice student, lights a candle to signify one of the seven attributes required for membership in the organization.

“This year’s class of inductees is remarkable to say the least,” said CTE Principal Marla Berlin, who noted that the support of families and friends was equally noteworthy. “Congratulations to all of you.”

The students were from every school district in the county and represented the newest members of the National Technical Honor Society, which is the highest recognition for outstanding students in CTE.

To be eligible for the distinction, the inductees must set the bar for academic excellence and earn a 90 or higher GPA in their CTE class and an 80 or higher GPA at their home school district.

In addition to academic achievement, the honorees must also maintain an excellent attendance rate and demonstrate the following character attributes: honesty, service, responsibility, knowledge, skill, scholarship, citizenship and leadership.

All of these qualities were on display during the induction ceremony in the Mexico High School auditorium as the honorees humbly accepted their recognition certificates from BOCES administrators and officials, who lauded their achievements.

“These inductees have become role models to their family, friends and peers. They provide service at home and in their communities,” said Oswego County BOCES Board of Education President John Shelmidine. “It is a wonderful honor as well as an incredible responsibility.”

The board president also encouraged the inductees to be ready to adapt to change and to display character when encountering challenges. “When adversity knocks on your door, how do you respond?” he asked.

For the 160 students who were inducted into the honor society, adversity and challenge are part of daily life.

CTE students are challenged with more intensive reading and more demanding schedules than many of their peers, noted Roseann Bayne, Assistant Superintendent for Instruction at Oswego County BOCES.

In fact, Bayne cited research that showed that reading levels in technical education exceeds the reading levels in an average 11th or 12th grade classroom.

In the front, from left, Marla Berlin (Oswego County BOCES Career and Technical Education principal) joins John Shelmidine (OCB Board of Education president) and Roseann Bayne (OCB assistant superintendent for instruction) in congratulating second-year Oswego County BOCES students who were inducted into the National Technical Honor Society recently. In the second row, from left, are Jesse Merritt, Jordan Bennett, Nicole Carvey and Daniel Taylor. Third row, from left, are Samantha Ingersoll, Paige Lockwood and Stephanie Seeley. Fourth row, from left, are Annalee Stirpe, Koti Turner and Kayla Munger. Fifth row, from left, are David Whaley, Eric Hulbert and James Peet.

In the front, from left, Marla Berlin (Oswego County BOCES Career and Technical Education principal) joins John Shelmidine (OCB Board of Education president) and Roseann Bayne (OCB assistant superintendent for instruction) in congratulating second-year Oswego County BOCES students who were inducted into the National Technical Honor Society recently. In the second row, from left, are Jesse Merritt, Jordan Bennett, Nicole Carvey and Daniel Taylor. Third row, from left, are Samantha Ingersoll, Paige Lockwood and Stephanie Seeley. Fourth row, from left, are Annalee Stirpe, Koti Turner and Kayla Munger. Fifth row, from left, are David Whaley, Eric Hulbert and James Peet.

“Being able to read a technical manual puts you beyond a college level,” she said. “So when you have children attending BOCES, they’re not stepping down. They’re not learning less, they’re actually becoming more college and career ready.”

Those college and career-ready students who were inducted into the National Technical Honor Society (* denotes second-year member) were Abigail Allen, Emilee Anderson, Logan Aubeuf, Mckenna Bahner, Daniel Barsuch, Gary Baumbach Jr., Emily Becker, Khrysha Bednar, Jordan Bennett*, Aaron Bentley, Haley Besaw, Tyler Bliss, Sean Blum, Kyle Bogart, Alantis Bonanno, Trevor Boni, Taylor Borst, Alexander Britton, Kyle Buck, Savannah Bush, Joshua Buskey, Makayla Carson, Nicole Carvey*, Gabrielle Christopher, Joseph Clark, Brittany Cole, Alyssa Crandon, Kevin Cronk, Aaron Davis, Evan Davis, David DeLand, Dylan Dewitt, Johnelle Dishaw, Abigail Dixon*, Hollie Doyle, Taylor Duda, Hailey Dunsmoor, Miranda Edick, Makayla Elliott, Cody Ericksen, Joshua Ernestine, Tony Finch*, Annamarie Forestiere, Gabryel Fortino, Jacklyn Foster, Makayla Fowler, Alena Fresch, Jerry Friot, Benjamin Frymoyer, Hannah Gardner, Kyle Gravelle, Frances Green, Kylie Hanni, Benjamin Harper*, Richard Harper, Ashley Hatten, Anthony Haywood, Hunter Hilton, Karley Hilton, Cassondra Horridge, Patrick Howell, Eric Hulbert*, Ashley Hurlbut, Samantha Ingersoll*, Allison Johnson, Mariah Johnson, Devlin Kilmer-Allen, Jacob Kimball, Kody Kingsley, Kathleen Kinney, Ty Kranz, Aleah LaFlamme, Ruby Lagoda, Derrik Lamanteer*, Steven Larkin, Mark Lauricella*, Jeffrey Lawson, Shawn Layton, Jason Leon, Zachary Litz, Meghan LiVoti, Paige Lockwood*, John Loura, Alexandra Mannise, Leonardo Marino, Steven Maynard, Ashley McCann, Maureen McCann, Caitlyn McRae, Jesse Merritt*, Gianna Migliaccio, Bradley Molsberger, Desteny Moore, Michaela Moran, Cullynn Morley, Rachelle Morrison, Zachery Mosher, Alexandra Mueller, Erik Muench, Kayla Munger*, Tracie Murphy, Kaitlyn Naylor, Erik Neacosia, William Niedzwecki*, Meagan Oakes, Perrin Ogden*, Brenna O’Neil, Hunter Ouderkirk, Jonathan Parker, Austin Parkhurst*, Gage Parkhurst, Courtney Pasco, Kathryn Paye, James Peet*, Jadon Powell, Elaine Powers, Richard Prent*, Haley Purdy, Richelle Ranieri, David Rice, Kayla Richards, Kendall Ridgeway, Austin Rizzo, Maxwell Roberts, Alissa Robinson, Lindsay Rollson, Brandon Rotach*, Amanda Ryan, CodiAnne Salzman, Anita Savich, Nathaniel Schroeder, Stephanie Seeley*, Shelby Sheehan, Natalie Shopland, Garrett Skinner, Joseph Smith, Leighton Smith, Mikaylea Sonnacchio, Matthew Sova, Erin Stever, Annalee Stirpe*, Steven Stonecypher, Robert Swan, Eric Swart, Katrina Tafler, Daniel Taylor*, Jessica Thompson, Koti Turner*, Jhannine Verceles, Michael Visco, Ian Vivlemore*, Natasha Waloven, Taylor Walpole, David Whaley*, Kelsie Wilson, Heather Wood, Jennifer Young, Caden Zahn, Adam Zayown and Caleb Zehr.

County youth among 28 Junior Dairy Leaders to graduate at Empire Farm Days

Twenty-eight New York Dairy Leaders will graduate at Empire Farm Days on August 6 at 1:30 p.m. hosted by the Empire Farm Days Dairy Profit Seminar Center at the Northeast’s largest outdoor farm show at Rodman Lott and Son Farms in Seneca Falls.

The 2014 class of New York's Junior Dairy Leaders. Photo: Cornell University.

The 2014 class of New York’s Junior Dairy Leaders. Photo: Cornell University.

Junior Dairy Leader program coordinator Deborah Grusenmeyer, with Pro-Dairy and assistant coordinator Betsey Howland will welcome families and visitors to the graduation which includes a presentation of the program year by the graduating members and sponsor recognition.

The Cornell Pro-Dairy Junior Dairy Leader is a statewide program for youth between the ages of 16 and 19 who have an interest in learning more about career opportunities in the dairy industry and gaining hands-on experience in the field. The year-long program combines a series of hands-on workshops focusing on specific facets of the dairy industry in veterinary science, dairy nutrition, production management, and on-farm production analysis, with opportunities for interaction with dairy producers, industry professionals, and other dairy-interested young people.

The Junior Dairy Leader program begins in September with a seven-day trip to Madison, Wisc., to tour dairies and agribusinesses, followed by attending the annual National 4-H Dairy Conference.

Class members participate in eight workshops throughout the year, focusing on team building, personality styles, resume development, change, and leadership skills development, as well as facets of dairy production, tours, and exposure to numerous career options in the dairy field.

The 2014 Junior Dairy Leader class members are

. Chautauqua County: Benjamin Dye, Hewitt Meeder, Andrew Miller
. Chemung County: Wesley Noble
. Chenango County: Peter Robinson
. Cortland County: Austin Burrows
. Erie County: Dalton Gerhardt
. Genesee County: Sarrah Matla
. Herkimer County: Travis Nelson, Kayla Windecker
. Niagara County: Christopher Sweeney
. Oneida County: Kristen Gallagher, Jaycie Staring
. Onondaga County: Tylor McCaulley
. Ontario County: Huntter Weigert
. Orange County: Madeline Goldsmith, Eileen Van Vorst
. Oswego County: Justine Williamson
. Otsego County: Mariah Goodwin, Avery Schneider, Cody Sears
. Rensselaer County: Michael Sullivan
. Saratoga County: Stephanie McBath, Alana Phelps
. St. Lawrence County: Jennifer King
. Tioga County: Taylor Mead
. Westchester County: Rachel Marderstein, Kerry McCann.

The 2014 sponsors of the Junior Dairy Leaders program are the Cornell Pro-Dairy Program, Northeast Agricultural Education Foundation, Professional Dairy Producers Association, DEHM Associates, SHUR-GAIN USA, Genex/CRI, Select Sire Power, Northeast Farm Credit AgEnhancement Program, Cargill Animal Nutrition, Northeast Ag and Feed Alliance, New York Corn and Soybean Growers Association, Cornell’s Department of Animal Science, and New York’s dairy producers.

The Dairy Profit Seminar Center at Empire Farm Days is located between East Make-a-Buck and East Seneca Acres avenues at the Northeast’s largest outdoor farm show, held at the Rodman Lott and Son Farms in Seneca Falls from August 5-7.

Learn more at www.empirefarmdays.com

GRB students present research findings at environmental summit

Using the knowledge acquired in Dan Mainville’s global environment course at G. Ray Bodley High School, 11 students recently showcased their research at an environmental summit sponsored by SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry.

Tevin Simard, a Fulton high school senior, removes macro invertebrates from a water sample he tests as part of a research project. He and his lab partner, MacKenzie Grow, presented their findings recently at an annual environmental summit in Syracuse.

Tevin Simard, a Fulton high school senior, removes macro invertebrates from a water sample he tests as part of a research project. He and his lab partner, MacKenzie Grow, presented their findings recently at an annual environmental summit in Syracuse.

The summit provides an opportunity for students enrolled in the college-level course to present their findings to their peers, SUNY ESF faculty and scholars.

The research is conducted as part of the global environment course curriculum and gives students a better understanding of the subject matter.

It also encourages students to review scientific literature, engage in critical thinking and consider science-related careers.

For the students from Fulton, their hard work in the classroom this year was on display as they delivered their oral presentations and displayed posters highlighting their research.

Seniors Mark Pollock, Jeremy Langdon and Seth DeLisle showcased their findings regarding the effects of cigarette filter pollution on the mortality rate of daphnia.

“We all brainstormed ideas for our research project and since we like to fish and we always see cigarette butts on the shore, we thought it would make a good topic,” DeLisle said. “We wanted to know how the cigarette butts impact the daphnia population.”

G. Ray Bodley High School students (from left) Mark Pollock, Jeremy Langdon and Seth DeLisle present their research findings, which explored how cigarette filter pollution impacts the mortality rate of daphnia. They joined students from several local school districts who delivered presentations during a recent summit sponsored by SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry.

G. Ray Bodley High School students (from left) Mark Pollock, Jeremy Langdon and Seth DeLisle present their research findings, which explored how cigarette filter pollution impacts the mortality rate of daphnia. They joined students from several local school districts who delivered presentations during a recent summit sponsored by SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry.

The group noted that their findings were eye-opening and indicated a significant death rate of daphnia when placed in polluted water.

“If the cigarette butts affect the daphnia, then the food chain would be disrupted. Look at all the living things that rely on the daphnia,” Pollock said as he gestured toward an illustration of the food chain.

In addition to the pollution and remediation presentation, three other GRB students gave an oral presentation during the summit. Seniors Keisha Pierce, Josh Plonka and Konner Myers explored biodiversity and natural history to determine how earthworms affect forest ecosystems.

“The students did very well,” Mainville said. “They had a unique opportunity to present their research to college professors who specialize in the environmental fields … No pressure! They did a fantastic job and I couldn’t be more proud of them.”

Other high schools participating in the environmental summit were Chittenango, East Syracuse-Minoa, Fabius-Pompey, LaFayette, Institute of Technology, Liverpool, Ulster BOCES New Visions, Westhill, Solvay and Vestal.

Parents become students as Fulton district shines spotlight on math

In an effort to help parents better understand the math curriculum and the strategies implemented as part of the Common Core, the Fulton City School District recently hosted an information night.

Fulton City School District instructional math coach Lynnette DePoint (left) reviews array and area models with parents Elizabeth Thompson and Toby McCleery, who have a first grader in the district.

Fulton City School District instructional math coach Lynnette DePoint (left) reviews array and area models with parents Elizabeth Thompson and Toby McCleery, who have a first grader in the district.

Focusing on foundational strategies for math and some of the new terms and tools used in the classroom, district instructional math coach Lynnette DePoint and math specialists Kelly Stadtmiller, Kristine Kaufman and Amanda Haggerty led the discussion. Parents learned about number bonds, tape diagrams, array and area models, and place value charts and disks.

“I think you will find some clarity in the transitions from kindergarten up through the higher grade levels,” DePoint said as parents explored the math strategies in four separate groups.

For Sandy Criswell, who has a daughter in seventh grade, the information night provided her with a hands-on math lesson and some insight into what her child was learning in the classroom.

“I can get the answer, I just can’t always get it the same way she gets it,” Criswell said. “This encourages them to actually understand the concept rather than memorize something.”

According to Haggerty, who had several math exercises for parents to try using place value disks, the Common Core curriculum is encouraging that kind of critical thinking and helping students build a strong foundation in mathematics.

“There are tons of ways to get to an answer, but it is critical for students to understand the process and how they got to an answer,” Haggerty said. “We are promoting a deeper understanding.”

While the students are getting a better understanding of math concepts, the parents who attended the recent information night walked away with a deeper understanding as well.

Fulton students ‘channel’ history knowledge during visit to the locks

Fourth graders at Lanigan Elementary School recently built on their classroom studies of geography and water navigation by getting a first-hand look at the lock system along the Oswego River.

Jacob Tanner, a fourth grade student at Lanigan Elementary School, pretends to be the captain of the Tug Urger during a recent fieldtrip to the Fulton locks.

Jacob Tanner, a fourth grade student at Lanigan Elementary School, pretends to be the captain of the Tug Urger during a recent fieldtrip to the Fulton locks.

The students traveled to the locks, where they hopped aboard the Tug Urger, examined the lock system, learned about water pollution and received a history lesson about the importance of waterways as a transportation mechanism.

The tug’s four-man crew discussed the history of the 113-year-old vessel, its 20-ton engine, and what it is like to travel along the water.

“The locks create flat water to navigate, otherwise the river would be rough,” said crew member Mike Burns as he displayed a small-scale replica version of the locks.

Students had a chance to move a miniature boat through the replica lock structure, all while learning about the gravitational operation of the locks.

During a recent fieldtrip, Lanigan Elementary School fourth graders examine a replica of the lock system while gaining some insight into the history of local waterways.

During a recent fieldtrip, Lanigan Elementary School fourth graders examine a replica of the lock system while gaining some insight into the history of local waterways.

Sandy Creek Volleyball team members recognized for athletic achievement

Several members of the Sandy Creek Varsity Volleyball team were recognized for outstanding athletic achievement.

Volleyball team members recognized for outstanding athletic achievement from left are: McKenna Guarasce - All Star; Kylie Hanni - All Star, All Section Honorable Mention; Grace Wallace - All Star, All Section Honorable Mention; Kylee Martin - All Star, All Section; and Michaela Martin - All Star.

Volleyball team members recognized for outstanding athletic achievement from left are: McKenna Guarasce – All Star; Kylie Hanni – All Star, All Section Honorable Mention; Grace Wallace – All Star, All Section Honorable Mention; Kylee Martin – All Star, All Section; and Michaela Martin – All Star.

The team is coached by Dorianne Hathway.

The team members pictured here were selected for All Star and All Section status.

Kylee Martin, was named to the All Section team, with Kylie Hanni and Grace Wallace receiving All Section Honorable Mention. Kylee Martin was also named All Star along with Michaela Martin, Kylie Hanni, Grace Wallace and McKenna Guarasce.

Coach Hathway also recognized the seniors on the team including: Kylee Martin, Michaela Martin, Kylie Hanni, Grace Wallace, Shania Darling, and Madison Bush.

Senior members of the Sandy Creek Varsity Volleyball team from left are: Madison Bush, Shania Darling, Kylie Hanni, Grace Wallace, Kylee Martin and Michaela Martin.

Senior members of the Sandy Creek Varsity Volleyball team from left are: Madison Bush, Shania Darling, Kylie Hanni, Grace Wallace, Kylee Martin and Michaela Martin.

Classroom chick project a huge favorite

For many years, students in Patty King’s third grade classroom at Sandy Creek Elementary School have participated in a very special and highly anticipated chick hatching project.

“Can I keep it?” asks Cade Stoker, a third grade student at Sandy Creek Elementary School. The class project involved hatching eggs in an incubator and studying the genetics and life cycle of a chicken.

“Can I keep it?” asks Cade Stoker, a third grade student at Sandy Creek Elementary School. The class project involved hatching eggs in an incubator and studying the genetics and life cycle of a chicken.

Each year, Mrs. King gets fertilized eggs from several area farms, and puts them into an incubator.

The students learn about chicken growth and development, and are even able to watch the chicks through a special microscope-type tool that projects a light through the shell of the egg and illuminates the growing chicken inside the egg.

The students eagerly count down the incubation timeline and as the hatching date nears, a video camera is set up on the incubator to broadcast the exciting hatching times via the Sandy Creek District website.

Timed to coincide with the school’s science fair, the chicks make their school-wide debut at the science fair along with lots of science data the students gather about the growth and development of the chickens.

During the hatching and first few days following, the chicks are video stars with a 24-hour “chick cam” streaming to the district website which allows students and visitors to the site an opportunity to watch the chicks hatch and then track their growth and progress.

“I’ve had students from the high school come up to me and say they watched the chicks hatch from home,” said King.

King uses the project to teach her students about many things aside from the obvious scientific study of the animal.

Zachary Cummins carefully holds a baby chick recently hatched in his classroom’s incubator. Patricia King, third grade teacher at Sandy Creek Elementary School, annually involves students in the chick project for the school’s science fair.

Zachary Cummins carefully holds a baby chick recently hatched in his classroom’s incubator. Patricia King, third grade teacher at Sandy Creek Elementary School, annually involves students in the chick project for the school’s science fair.

Since the eggs come from several sources, King teaches the students about genetics and identifying specific characteristics and traits associated with certain breeds of chicken to help identify where the egg could have come from and who the parent chickens could be.

In spite of all of the scientific knowledge the children gain, King is especially proud of the way the students learn other important lessons such as responsibility, respect and nurturing.

One of the toughest lessons the students learn, though, is letting the chickens go at the end of the experiment. Each student, at some point in the process, has asked Mrs. King if they can have “just one” to take home and keep, but the chicks are distributed back to the farms to carry on the tradition and generate future eggs, perhaps for next years’ chick project.

Lanigan students explore the great outdoors on trip to Beaver Lake Nature Center

Brooke Reynolds, left, and Rebekah May discovered a small caterpillar during their exploration of one of the trails at Beaver Lake Nature Center.

Brooke Reynolds, left, and Rebekah May discovered a small caterpillar during their exploration of one of the trails at Beaver Lake Nature Center.

Second graders from Lanigan Elementary School studied plants and animals in their natural habitat during a recent field trip to Beaver Lake Nature Center.

The students were given guided and self-guided tours of the trails and displays in the center.

They were able to spot a wide variety of animals, insects, reptiles and more during their day-long trip and enjoyed the many signposts detailing unique natural wonders along the trails and at the water’s edge.

Friends and fellow second-graders from Lanigan Elementary School paused for a photo at one of the scenic lake overlooks during their field trip to Beaver Lake Nature Center. The students, left to right are: Clarissa Fake, Jordyn Woodcock, Daniela Mendez, and Jaelyn DeSalvatore.

Friends and fellow second-graders from Lanigan Elementary School paused for a photo at one of the scenic lake overlooks during their field trip to Beaver Lake Nature Center. The students, left to right are: Clarissa Fake, Jordyn Woodcock, Daniela Mendez, and Jaelyn DeSalvatore.

True Beauty club at Sandy Creek High School raises suicide prevention awareness

Members of the True Beauty Club at Sandy Creek High School recently held a suicide awareness day at the school.

From left manning the True Beauty suicide awareness table during one of the lunch periods of the day are: Lindsey Goodnough, Deanna Rusz, Valarie Kampff, John Shirley, Brittany Valley, Wayne Sponable and Caitlyn Williams.

From left manning the True Beauty suicide awareness table during one of the lunch periods of the day are: Lindsey Goodnough, Deanna Rusz, Valarie Kampff, John Shirley, Brittany Valley, Wayne Sponable and Caitlyn Williams.

The students had a table set up with information about teen depression and suicide prevention.

Suicide Prevention Education Awareness Kit (SPEAK) information was available for students to read and the club passed out ribbons to raise awareness of teen depression and suicide.

The True Beauty Club, with more than 120 members, is in its second year and was formed to recognize an individual’s true beauty rather than focus on looks and superficial beauty.

Tanya Van Ornum and Michael Stevens are co-advisors of the group in grades six to twelve.

Also handing out ribbons to raise awareness of teen depression and suicide were: Jessica Leppien, Lindsey Goodnough, Richelle Ranieri, Courtney Plumley, Tanya Van Ornum, Caitlyn Williams, Bailey Laudre and Wayne Sponable.

Also handing out ribbons to raise awareness of teen depression and suicide were: Jessica Leppien, Lindsey Goodnough, Richelle Ranieri, Courtney Plumley, Tanya Van Ornum, Caitlyn Williams, Bailey Laudre and Wayne Sponable.

Breann Burns breaks Section III 100-meter hurdles record

Breann Burns set a Section III record for the 100 meter hurdles during the New York state track and field championships recently. Her time of 14.30 seconds broke the 27-year-old record by nine-tenths of a second. She is pictured with Jeff Shirley, Pulaski’s Athletic Director.

Breann Burns set a Section III record for the 100 meter hurdles during the New York state track and field championships recently. Her time of 14.30 seconds broke the 27-year-old record by nine-tenths of a second. She is pictured with Jeff Shirley, Pulaski’s Athletic Director.

Recently at the New York state track and field championships at Cicero North Syracuse High School, Pulaski High School track and field team member Breann Burns ran the 100 meter hurdles in 14.30 seconds, smashing a 27-year-old Section III record by nine-tenths of a second.

Burns finished in second place in the Division II race and second in the Federation Race which was the Division one and two combined.

Burns will run for the University of Rhode Island following graduation.

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STOP-DWI Program to Coordinate Halloween Weekend DWI Crackdown

Oswego County STOP-DWI Coordinator Robert Lighthall today (Oct. 30) announced that law enforcement agencies across Oswego County will deploy special DWI enforcement patrols to help ensure that our roadways will be safe during the Halloween weekend.

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Schumer to USDA: Fed Designation Would Grow Oswego’s Local Economy, Should Not Be A Heavy Lift

At the Shineman Center at SUNY Oswego on Thursday (Oct. 30), U.S. Senator Charles Schumer launched his push to get the Port of Oswego and SUNY Oswego a special federal designation that would allow the Port of Oswego to export grain and other agriculture products for the first time. Schumer explained that the port takes in approximately 10 million bushels of grain – soybeans, corn and wheat – each year, and then companies like Perdue send these grains by rail to Virginia where they then export them abroad.

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Rotarians Hear About The Internet

Gregory Peddle was the guest of Oswego Rotarian Mark DuFore recently. He spoke about Net Neutrality and the future of the Internet related to open access. Net Neutrality is the principle that Internet Service Providers and the government should treat all information on the Internet equally.

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Open House Set For Proposed Pulaski Bridge Rehabilitation

NYS Department of Transportation will hold an open house on November 6 regarding a bridge rehabilitation project on Route 11 over the Salmon River in Pulaski. It will take place from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Pulaski Fire Department, 12 Lake St. Preliminary drawings for the upcoming project will be available for review and representatives from NYSDOT will be present to answer questions. No formal presentation is planned.

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Ventriloquists dazzles at Granby Elementary

Laughter and joy overflowed into the hallways of Granby Elementary School recently, as ventriloquist Sylvia Fletcher and her puppets stopped by to give students a lesson in anti-bullying. Fletcher’s performance was designed to teach students the importance of not bullying and feeling comfortable with one another. Through comedic messages, the program reinforced the significance of creating a climate in the school in which students feel safe and comfortable.

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