We want your news! Send us: News release |Letter to the Editor | Share a picture | Newborn | Birthday | Engagement | Wedding | Other Milestone
Today







Granby Students Excited To Be 100 Days Smarter

Students in Jessica Frost’s kindergarten class at Granby Elementary School in the Fulton City School District recently had 100 reasons to celebrate.

Students in Jessica Frost’s kindergarten class at Granby Elementary recently celebrated the 100th day of school. Pictured, students Camron Clear and Grace Britton share a smile while working on a project.

Students in Jessica Frost’s kindergarten class at Granby Elementary recently celebrated the 100th day of school. Pictured, students Camron Clear and Grace Britton share a smile while working on a project.

On Feb. 24, the class commemorated the 100th day of the 2014-2015 school year by participating in a variety of fun and educational activities.

Each activity asked students to practice their math skills by counting to 100 by ones, fives and tens.

One of the more popular activities of the day asked students to create a hat from 10 pieces of construction paper.

Once the students had their 10 pieces of construction paper in place, they were asked to place 10 dots on each piece, creating a total of 100 dots.

“They have worked hard up to this point to and it is a wonderful time to celebrate their accomplishments and talk about the things they still would like to accomplish,” said Frost.

Giuliana Busch works on an activity that asks her to count to 100 by tens. Each hat needed 10 strips of construction paper and each piece of construction paper needed to have 10 dots.

Giuliana Busch works on an activity that asks her to count to 100 by tens. Each hat needed 10 strips of construction paper and each piece of construction paper needed to have 10 dots.

Lura M. Sharp Celebrates 100 Days Of School

Students at Lura M. Sharp Elementary School in the Pulaski Academy and Central School District recently held a celebration of centennial proportions.

On Feb. 24, the school celebrated the 100th day of the 2014-2015 school year and commemorated the occasion with an assortment of fun and educational activities.

Students in Denise Kelly’s kindergarten class and Katrina Archibee’s pre-kindergarten class worked together to bake a “100th Day Magic Cake.”

The recipe for the cake called for 100 mini marshmallows.

Students were tasked to work together to count the number of marshmallows that went into the cake’s batter.

Students at Lura M. Sharp Elementary recently celebrated the 100th day of the 2014-2015 school year. Students Emma Shumway and Michaela Sperati-Epding showcase necklaces they created with 100 beads.

Students at Lura M. Sharp Elementary recently celebrated the 100th day of the 2014-2015 school year. Students Emma Shumway and Michaela Sperati-Epding showcase necklaces they created with 100 beads.

After sprinkling the mini marshmallows on the bottom of a pan, the students poured the cake batter on the marshmallows and spooned cherries on top.

However, when the cake was done baking, the students were amazed to see that the top of the cake was glazed with the marshmallows, while the cherries had sunk to the bottom.

“When you work as hard as you have for 100 days, magic can happen,” Kelly told the students.

Students in Bonney Catanzarite’s kindergarten class also celebrated the 100th day of school by created necklaces featuring 100 beads.

CiTi Looking To Form Partnerships With Local Businesses

MEXICO – Personnel with the Center for Instruction, Technology and Innovation’s recently attended a Greater Oswego Chamber of Commerce meeting to provide information on Career and Technical Education programs and initiate potential partnerships with local businesses.

Business Partnerships Explored

Business Partnerships Explored

In front of more than a dozen local business owners and officials, CiTi’s Business Education Liaison Garrett Weiss and Career and Technical Education Principal Marla Berlin provided a brief course description for each of CiTi’s CTE programs.

Weiss explained that the programs provide students with opportunities to learn essential work skills and noted by forming partnerships with local businesses, the students could become even better prepared for their future careers.

“These students need their education, and how better can they get it then by coming from the (local) business owners?” Weiss asked. “So in the back of your head, think about how our students could benefit you.”

Weiss noted several ways that CiTi and local businesses could begin to form partnerships, including coordinating field trips to local businesses so student can experience authentic work conditions and arraigning community projects that could benefit both the students and the businesses.

“If you have projects that we can get involved with, please give us a call. We would love to get involved for the benefit of the kids,” Weiss said. “We want to build relationships with local businesses.”

Weiss provided examples of partnerships CiTi’s CTE program has already formed with local businesses or organizations.

In one example, Weiss explained how construction technology students are currently helping to build ramps for the ARISE Oswego County Ramp Program.

The ramps will be built individually in sections and then assembled later on the site of qualified applicant homes belonging to persons with disabilities.

Battle Of The Books Begins At APW Elementary

Altmar-Parish-Williamstown Elementary School held its battle of the books recently, the primary competition that decides who will continue on to the district level competition.

Sixth graders Lilly Sweeney and Katie Trumble are feeling good half way through the competition.

Sixth graders Lilly Sweeney and Katie Trumble are feeling good half way through the competition.

Battle of the books is a reading initiative where students read a given list of books for that year and then form teams and participate in multi-level competitions testing their familiarity with the readings.

The stakes were high for the fifth and the sixth graders when the competition ended in a three-way tie for fifth place.

Only the top five teams continue on to the district level competition. A set of tie-breaker questions determined the victors.

Third and fourth graders that will continue to the district level competition on March 11 are:

Third graders Jack Rattray and Turner Wheaton and fourth grader Aiden Boucher pose for a team photo at the APW Elementary Battle of the Books.

Third graders Jack Rattray and Turner Wheaton and fourth grader Aiden Boucher pose for a team photo at the APW Elementary Battle of the Books.

Avery Oakes, Laura Kinney, Julianna Phillips,Will Alsworth, Jason Bobanick, Charley Skellington-Bice, Christina Morse, Cooper Brouse, Peyton Flanagan, Kristi Cross, Emily Provost, Gabby Smith, Bruce Pitre, Mikayla Mattison, Sawyer Garrett, Olivia Dalin, Makayla King and Katherine Babcock.

Fifth and sixth graders that will continue to the district level are: Caralyn Benedetto, Zoie Ferris, Evelyn Butterworth, Sarah Davis, Isabelle Hallock, Amelia Auringer, Julianna Bresha, Sydney Townsend, Vinnie Bresha, Michael Kinney, Lilly Sweeney, Katie Trumble and Brooke Wood.

Students that succeed at the district level competition will compete against other schools at the county-wide Battle of the Books on March 24 at the Fulton City School District.

Excellus BlueCross BlueShield Awards Hospitals $26 Million for Quality Improvements

Forty-five upstate New York hospitals and health centers last year earned $26 million in quality improvement incentive payments from Excellus BlueCross BlueShield as part of the health insurer’s Hospital Performance Incentive Program. In the past 10 years, quality performance incentives from Excellus BlueCross BlueShield have exceeded $197 million.

“We applaud our hospital partners, not only for their willingness to collaborate with our health plan on methods and measurements to improved health outcomes and patient safety, but also for tying those outcomes to a financial incentive to drive focus in mutually agreed upon quality goals,” said Carrie Whitcher, vice president clinical quality at Excellus BlueCross BlueShield.

Participating in this program in 2014 were eight Central New York hospitals, including Auburn Memorial Hospital, Cortland Regional Medical Center, Crouse Hospital, Oswego Hospital, Samaritan Medical Center, St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center and Upstate University Health System (2 sites).

“Partnering with Excellus BlueCross BlueShield allows both organizations to achieve shared goals of improved community health through working together,” said Jennifer Watkins, Director, Quality Improvement, Crouse Hospital. “Participation in the Hospital Performance Incentive Program has provided us opportunity for increased education, resources and the ability to network with peers facing similar hurdles to success.”

Launched in 2004, the Hospital Performance Incentive Program evaluates participating hospitals on more than 247 performance measures. In 2014, hospitals achieved 88 percent of all target quality levels. In addition to required clinical and patient safety measures, other nationally endorsed measures and target outcomes are jointly agreed upon by each hospital and the health insurer using benchmarks established by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, The Joint Commission, the Institute for Healthcare Improvement and others.

Areas targeted for improvement include:

• Clinical Processes of Care – Focused on improvements in heart attack care, heart failure, pneumonia and surgical care, and other measures that may be unique to each participating hospital.
• Patient Safety – Centered on reductions in hospital-acquired infections, falls, pressure ulcers, readmissions and other adverse events or errors that affect patient care.
• Patient Satisfaction – Using the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey, which is the first national, standardized, publicly reported survey of patients’ perspectives of hospital care.

Relevance in upstate New York
(From the Excellus BlueCross BlueShield Spring 2013 fact sheet on Hospital-Acquired Infections in Upstate New York)

In 2010, New York state reported about 108,000 hospital-acquired infections, including 24,000 in upstate New York. Those hospital-acquired infections led to an estimated 5,000 New York state deaths, 1,100 of which were in upstate New York.

If upstate New York hospitals could lower the number of hospital-acquired infections by even 20 percent or 40 percent, there would be an estimated 5,000 to 10,000 fewer infections and 200 to 400 fewer associated deaths, the Excellus BlueCross BlueShield report concludes. That would also save upstate New York hospitals an estimated $68 million to $137 million annually.

Maroun Students Quilt Together Western Expansion

Heather Cannella and Patty Lazarz’s classes engaged in the learning of Westward Expansion with the creation of a class quilt at Michael A Maroun Elementary.

Heather Canella’s class proudly displays its quilt, which showcases the learning of Westward Expansion.

Heather Canella’s class proudly displays its quilt, which showcases the learning of Westward Expansion.

The students heard a story each day relating to the topic of Westward Expansion during their listening block.

Traditionally, students would have written a summary of the lesson, but Cannella and Lazarz had other ideas.

“The kids got to complete a quilt square that highlighted the most important parts of the story, in writing, and then they illustrated a main character or important concept in the center of the square,” said Cannella.

The classes each used their paper patches to create a giant quilt on the bulletin board outside of their classroom.

Each student created a total of nine quilt squares.

Tour of Volney Historic Homes, Structures And Points Of Interest

The town of Volney History Center is pleased to offer “Tour of Historic Homes, Structures and Sites of Interest in the Township.“

On April 25 a trolley provided by the Great Lakes Trolley Company will leave the town hall on County Route 6, Volney Center at 9 a.m.

There will be two stops on the tour: the Pinewood School on Route 57 and the North Volney Church on County Route 6.

A guest speaker will give a short talk on the history of Pinewood and Head Start will be celebrating its 50th anniversary ”so we may have information up and flyers that we could give out about the Pinewoods program.”

A member of the North Volney Church will speak on the history and moving of the church across the road.

There will be several display boards.

Seating is limited and by reservation only.

Please call 593-2293 from March 1 to 21 only to make a reservation; leave name, phone number and number of reservations.

Lanigan Class Develops Newscast, Interviews Mayor Woodward

A brainstorming session led by Brad DePoint’s Lanigan Elementary School students recently transformed into a class video project, complete with an interview with the Fulton mayor.

The massive undertaking began with students learning about local current events and developing questions about significant issues that impact the Fulton community.

Fulton Mayor Ron Woodward reviews a map of Lake Neatahwanta with students in Brad DePoint’s classroom at Lanigan Elementary School. As part of a class project, the students videotaped an interview with the mayor, who answered questions about the ongoing lake cleanup efforts.

Fulton Mayor Ron Woodward reviews a map of Lake Neatahwanta with students in Brad DePoint’s classroom at Lanigan Elementary School. As part of a class project, the students videotaped an interview with the mayor, who answered questions about the ongoing lake cleanup efforts.

The Lake Neatahwanta dredging project emerged as a primary source of discussion, and students wrote questions to ask Fulton Mayor Ron Woodward.

“We had all these great questions and ideas, and we thought it would be a good learning experience to get the answers straight from our elected officials,” DePoint said. “We contacted the mayor’s office and he was willing to be part of our project.”

With an interview set up with the mayor, students took things a step further and decided to create an entire newscast, complete with a weather segment, current events and sports.

The students recorded the interviews and worked with DePoint to edit the content, with the goal of eventually streaming it online.

According to DePoint, the project proved to be an excellent lesson that incorporated a variety of subject areas.

“The students wrote scripts, they researched current events, they learned about lake pollution … they really did a bit of everything,” he said.

For the students who collaborated on the project, the opportunity to learn about local news proved to be a valuable lesson.

“It was really cool to meet the mayor and ask him all these questions,” student Owen Sheldon said. “I learned about the dredging and how they plan on cleaning up the nutrients at the bottom of the lake so that we can swim in it in the next few years.”

Dual Enrollment Courses Offer Plenty Of Options For Fulton High School Students

When students at Fulton’s G. Ray Bodley High School begin developing their schedules for next year, they will have a chance to extend their education to the post-secondary level with a number of college credit-bearing courses.

Dual enrollment opportunities are available at GRB thanks to articulation agreements with Cayuga Community College, Onondaga Community College, SUNY Oswego, SUNY Environmental Science and Forestry, and Rochester Institute of Technology.

These partnerships allow students to participate in college-level courses while earning credit and promoting critical thinking.

“We offer so many opportunities for the kids to get a jumpstart on their college education,” said GRB Principal Donna Parkhurst. “There is a cost associated with some of the credit-bearing courses, but it is so minimal ($175) compared to taking the class while enrolled in college. We try to emphasize with the parents that it’s just so much cheaper to take the classes here than at college.”

According to Parkhurst, one of the more popular offerings is the Cayuga Advantage program.

The initiative is free to participants and is comprised of sophisticated, intensive college coursework.

“These courses are more challenging and academically rigorous than high school courses and require greater independence of thought and action,” Parkhurst said.

While some of the courses fall under the basic general education category such as English, psychology and health, other dual enrollment offerings can net students credit in areas like business, public justice, engineering, economics, accounting and foreign language.

The broad range of courses gives GRB students an advantage as they pursue a post-secondary degree, Parkhurst said.

“The kids can take the courses here and then walk into college, as freshmen, with credit already,” Parkhurst said. “Even if they don’t take the dual enrollment courses, there are other upper-level Advanced Placement classes that we offer. There are quite a few options for our students.”

Budget Development A Community Effort In Fulton City School District

Members of the Fulton community are joining forces with school district officials as the 2015-2016 school budget process unfolds in the coming months.

The collaborative effort kicked off in January as parents, board of education representatives, FCSD administrators and community members came together for a budget committee meeting.

Members of the Fulton City School District Budget Committee listen as Superintendent William Lynch discusses the budget process. The group will meet periodically in the months leading up to the May 19 school budget vote and board of education elections.

Members of the Fulton City School District Budget Committee listen as Superintendent William Lynch discusses the budget process. The group will meet periodically in the months leading up to the May 19 school budget vote and board of education elections.

Facilitated by Superintendent William Lynch, the group outlined spending and revenue goals, reviewed a budget timeline, examined the Regents Reform Agenda, discussed anticipated state aid and explored reserve fund options.

While there are a number of factors that play a role in the development of the spending plan, the superintendent noted that the process is guided largely by board policy.

The proposal is also designed to align with the district’s primary objectives.

“Anything in our budget should support our mission statement and should support our guiding principles,” Lynch said. “We have to be very thoughtful as to how we spend the money we have, and we need to make sure we’re meeting the needs of all learners in the district. We also have to make sure there’s engagement of parents, community members and site teams so there is constant back-and-forth communication.”

Although still early in the budget development process, committee members were encouraged by the school district’s program offerings, the amount of money in the reserve fund, and the district’s commitment to fiscal responsibility.

“As we move forward in the process, we will maximize our use of federal funds; ensure we are meeting mandates; focus on maintaining safe, secure and healthy learning environments; and identify a tax impact that is predictable,” Lynch said.

For important budget dates and related documents, visit www.fulton.cnyric.org/board/budget1516.cfm

Search Our Archives:

Oswego High School Third Quarter Honor Roll Announced

The Oswego High School has announced the students making the honor roll for the third marking period.

Continue reading


Oswego Hospital Auxiliary Makes Generous Donation to Health System

Each May, as Oswego Health celebrates May as healthcare month, members of the auxiliary make a large donation to the health system, which ensures that exceptional healthcare programs and services will remain available locally.

Continue reading


Fulton’s Memorial Day Salute Set Saturday

FULTON, NY – Fulton’s Memorial Day Salute is set for Saturday. The entertainment will feature The Billionaires, one of the very best and most experienced bands in Central New York. Joshua Batstone will also be showcased. Other festivities include a … Continue reading


Health Department Announces Clinic Services for Week of May 26

The Oswego County Health department offers a variety of services to all residents of Oswego County, including preventive health services, certified home health care, certified hospice, and a maternal and child health program.

Continue reading


County Legislature Recognizes Older Americans

The Oswego County Legislature’s Human Services Committee recently presented a proclamation designating May as Older Americans Month. Since 1955, the Older Americans Act has provided services that help older adults remain healthy and independent.

Continue reading



v3_2014_64