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GRB Class of 2014 President Earns a Full-ride to College

Tevin Simard, a senior at G. Ray Bodley, has been awarded the Gates Millennium Scholarship.

The program selects 1,000 students each year to receive an all-expenses paid scholarship to a four year college or university of their choosing.

Pictured is graduating senior Tevin Simard, the Class President of 2014, who received a full-ride scholarship to Georgetown University. He will also travel to Jordan this summer to learn Arabic.

Pictured is graduating senior Tevin Simard, the Class President of 2014, who received a full-ride scholarship to Georgetown University. He will also travel to Jordan this summer to learn Arabic.

Simard was also chosen for the National Security Language Initiative for Youth (NSLI-Y) program that provides merit-based scholarships for eligible high school students to learn less commonly taught languages in overseas immersion programs.

He will stay with a host family for six-weeks in Jordan, and learn Arabic.

The program curriculum is designed to facilitate, through immersion and intensive learning, the equivalent of one year of Arabic instruction at a U.S. university.

With Ramadan beginning on June 29, Simard will be able to witness the holy month first-hand.

He will also visit the Ancient City of Petra and other historical sites.

Simard will attend Georgetown University in the fall, and leave for Jordan just before Fulton’s graduation ceremony.

Clifford Shares Valuable Lessons with BOCES Students

Clifford the Big Red Dog recently visited students on Robyn Yorker’s Blue Team at Oswego County BOCES Stepping Stones Day Program at Fourth Street School in Fulton.

Oswego County BOCES student Madisyn Stuper holds swag she received after a recent visit by Clifford to her school.

Oswego County BOCES student Madisyn Stuper holds swag she received after a recent visit by Clifford to her school.

BOCES students enjoyed a story from Clifford’s friend Renee Ames at WCNY-TV, who accompanied him during the visit.

The story was about his special relationship with Emily Elizabeth and the characteristics that make him a good friend.

The class talked about what it means to be in control of their choices, respecting personal space and strategies they can choose when feeling upset.

Walking and getting some exercise makes Clifford feel better, but students could also count to ten, go on a computer or listen to music to lift their mood.

Students were treated to Clifford pencils and books, and the Big Red Dog signed autographs.

A lesson in giving: Pulaski kindergartner, teacher make an impact in Ethiopia

When school was out of session in mid-April, Pulaski Middle School teacher Ashleigh Wilson and her daughter, Emma, traded in their schoolwork for charitable work during a week-long visit to Ethiopia.

Pulaski Middle School teacher Ashleigh Wilson and her daughter, Emma, a kindergartner in the district, are all smiles during their recent charitable visit to Ethiopia.

Pulaski Middle School teacher Ashleigh Wilson and her daughter, Emma, a kindergartner in the district, are all smiles during their recent charitable visit to Ethiopia.

The trip was the culmination of several fundraising initiatives conducted in the Pulaski Academy and Central School District to benefit African HIV Orphans: Project Embrace (AHOPE). The organization began as a hospice facility for children dying of AIDS. Today, AHOPE offers housing, job training, life skills and basic necessities to the orphans it serves.

“We always knew that AHOPE was a great organization,” Wilson said. “But to actually see the work they do is remarkable. AHOPE has such a far-reaching impact.”

A group of Ethiopian children show off the bracelets that Pulaski Academy and Central School District students made and donated to an organization that cares for African youth stricken with HIV/AIDS.

A group of Ethiopian children show off the bracelets that Pulaski Academy and Central School District students made and donated to an organization that cares for African youth stricken with HIV/AIDS.

Wilson and Emma witnessed that impact first hand during their visit to Ethiopia this spring, and while they were just two people who physically made the journey across the globe, they noted that they didn’t do it alone.

The entire Pulaski community played a significant role in their charitable efforts, donating blankets, bracelets, personal hygiene items, toys, school supplies and other goods.

“We had 200 pounds worth of stuff … our school has always been very supportive, but this went beyond what we could have imagined,” Wilson said. “We brought enough blankets for essentially the entire orphanage.”

Lura Sharp Elementary School kindergartner Emma Wilson-Hefti helps paint a transition home while volunteering for AHOPE in Ethiopia during spring recess.

Lura Sharp Elementary School kindergartner Emma Wilson-Hefti helps paint a transition home while volunteering for AHOPE in Ethiopia during spring recess.

For Wilson, one of the greatest parts of the trip was watching as her daughter, a 6-year-old kindergartner at Lura Sharp Elementary School, experienced the joy of giving to people in need.

“I was so proud of her, she immersed herself in everything and really embraced the experience,” Wilson said. “The trip far exceeded our expectations and we couldn’t have done it without the support of PACS and the community.”

West First Street closure through May 21

OSWEGO, NY – On Monday, a detour was set up for the Sewer Separation Project.

Through traffic was detoured at Route 48 and Munn Street to West Fifth Street and traffic south was detoured at West First and Erie streets to West Fifth Street.

Local traffic was able to enter the construction zone with great caution.

The intersection of West First and Murray streets was closed to all traffic.

All construction was to be completed and West First Street was originally scheduled to be open by Friday.

However, the City Engineer’s Office has announced that the West First Street closure will now be extended through Wednesday.

If you have any questions or concerns, you may contact the City Engineer’s Office at 342-8153.

Schumer: Dangerous Toxic Algae Found In Nearly 100 Upstate NY Lakes Could Contaminate Drinking Water, Impact Summer Recreation Season

On Wednesday (May 14), U.S. Senator Charles E. Schumer urged the Environmental Protection Agency to act quickly to help curb the threat that toxic algae found in nearly 100 Upstate New York water bodies is posing to drinking water and New York residents. Schumer explained that conditions are ripe for record blue-green algae blooms in Upstate New York, and that the toxins that this algae produces, cyanotoxins, have the potential to contaminate local drinking water because many of these lakes or reservoirs are drinking water sources.

This toxin is also found in lakes that are used for boating and swimming, putting swimmers at risk and also potentially causing beach closures, which harm tourism and the local economy.

Therefore, Schumer is urging the EPA to issue guidance to help protect New York drinking water supplies and New York residents.

View Schumer Report – Toxic Algae

First, Schumer asked the EPA to issue guidance to help local water treatment plants test for and treat cyanotoxins in drinking water sources. Over a dozen countries including Canada currently test drinking water for cyanotoxins, but to date the EPA has not issued guidance on testing in the United States. Second, Schumer urged the EPA to develop water quality criteria for cyanotoxins in ambient water, which will help states better identify contaminated water bodies and implement water quality improvement programs that will help keep beaches open and drinking water safe.

“Lakes are some of Upstate New York’s greatest resources – for tourism, recreation, and for healthy drinking water – but toxic algae blooms threaten to greatly undercut the value of this resource, and what’s more, have the potential to contaminate drinking water and make people sick,” said Senator Schumer. “So I’m announcing a two-pronged plan that will help keep New Yorkers safe and protect our valuable lakes and reservoirs. First, I am urging the EPA to issue guidance and recommendations to local water treatment plans on how best to test for and treat these cyanotoxins. Second, I am pushing the EPA to develop clear water quality criteria for cyanotoxin levels in ambient water so that states like New York can better identify contaminated lakes and implement programs that will improve water quality.”

“With these two steps – one to address contamination in drinking water and one to address contamination in lakes primarily used for recreation — we can safeguard that glass of water we drink every day and ensure that lakes across Upstate New York can be enjoyed by tourists and residents alike,” he continued.

Due to a number of factors, including runoff from nearby agricultural areas and aging sewer systems, the amount of phosphorus in lakes across Upstate New York has increased in recent years, causing large algal blooms to grow in the water.

Climate change has also brought warmer temperatures and more spring rainfall, both of which favor the growth of algae blooms.

Blue-green algae blooms in particular produce cyanotoxins, which form as the algal blooms rob oxygen from the water.

In incidents reported throughout the U.S., water contamination caused by cyanotoxins has resulted in illness, beach closures, and animal deaths. In some areas of New York, conditions are ripe this year for record toxic algae blooms because – due to the Polar Vortex that hit this winter and the subsequent milder temperatures – rapid melting occurred. This caused extra runoff from nearby farms, whose soil contains phosphorous, a major contributing factor to the growing algae populations in many of our lakes.

Schumer explained that these factors, as well as increased human activity near water bodies, has resulted in the toxic algae blooms becoming more widespread than before.

According to a recent report by the National Wildlife Federation, New York leads a nationwide list for reports of toxic blue-green algae.

Schumer provided data on the number of Upstate New York water bodies that have had reported instances of toxic algae blooms over the past two years, according to the state Department of Environmental Conservation. In total, the state has reported that blue-green algae blooms have been found in nearly 100 upstate New York lakes.

• In the Capital Region, there were 17 lakes with reported algae blooms

• In Western New York, there were 8 lakes with reported algae blooms

• In the Rochester-Finger Lakes Region, there were 4 lakes with reported algae blooms

• In the Southern Tier, there were 16 lakes with reported algae blooms

• In Central New York, there were 17 lakes with reported algae blooms

• In the Hudson Valley, there were 27 lakes with reported algae blooms

• In the North Country, there were 7 lakes with reported algae blooms

The cyanotoxins found in Upstate New York water bodies include neurotoxins (affect the nervous system), hepatotoxins (affect the liver), and dermatoxins (affect the skin).

The presence of high levels of cyanotoxins in recreational water and drinking water may cause a wide range of symptoms including fever, headaches, muscle and joint pain, blisters, stomach cramps, diarrhea, vomiting, mouth ulcers, and allergic reactions. Such effects can occur within minutes to days after exposure. In severe cases, seizures, liver failure, respiratory arrest, and death may occur, although very rarely.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently reported on three instances in which a total of six people suffered rashes, sores, swelling, eye irritation and congestion after exposure to algal toxins in New York lakes.

In addition, in 2009 Wisconsin had more than 57 algae bloom related illnesses, and in the late 1990s more than 75 people died of liver failure in Brazil after drinking water contaminated with cyanotoxins.

Cyanotoxin contaminated water also impacts animals – claiming the lives of hundreds of animals, including elk, cows, and dogs across the country in recent years.

Although the hazards associated with cyanotoxins are apparent, and the risk this year is especially clear, the toxin has not been added to the EPA’s regulated contaminant list; rather it is listed on the potential contaminants list. Without this regulation, the EPA has not released guidelines or assistance for how local water treatment plants can prevent cyanotoxins from entering drinking water.

And, in the case of ambient water bodies, which are used mostly for recreation the EPA has not set criteria on water quality that would help states identify when a body of water is contaminated with cyanotoxins.

Therefore, Schumer is launching a two-pronged plan to address the growing problem of algae blooms and cyanotoxins in Upstate New York bodies of water. First, he is pressing the EPA to assist and direct local water treatment plants on how to more effectively filter water to avoid the presence of cyanotoxins; specifically the three types of toxins described above.

This would require the EPA to regulate and release guidance on cyanotoxins. Local water treatment plants should receive guidance on how to test for and treat cyanotoxins in the water supply, to mitigate the potential for contaminated drinking water, Schumer said.

The EPA has issued such guidelines for other contaminants like arsenic and lead.

Second, Schumer is urging the EPA to develop water quality criteria for cyanotoxins in ambient water. Schumer explained that these criteria – which would help states set standards for safe levels of these toxins – will help New York state and local communities develop their own criteria for which water bodies are in danger, which ones they should monitor, and which need immediate assistance. Overall, these criteria would help the New York State DEC more effectively implement water quality improvement programs that prevent toxic algal blooms and help clean them up when they are found. Schumer noted that, as the nation’s foremost scientific authority on environmental issues, the EPA should play a major role in identifying where the problem is most pressing and how to fix it, especially since the widespread nature of the problem is relatively recent.

In addition to this two-pronged push, Schumer is also working to attack the problem at its source by working to limit the sources that cause these algae blooms from making it into watersheds in the first place. One aspect of this is to upgrade aging sewer systems, which contribute to the algae growth with their periodic overflows and septic discharges. Schumer is working to address this sewer problem through his ongoing push to preserve or increase federal funding that can be used to upgrade aging sewer systems.

Another way to help mitigate the cause of toxic algae that Schumer noted is through the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) – a program that is part of the Farm Bill Schumer helped pass earlier this year.

Specifically, EQIP provides over $1 billion in financial assistance to farmers each year for conservation efforts that will help them limit erosion and runoff from their farms. According to Schumer, this will help farmers mitigate the phosphorous runoff which is contributing to algae growth.

Stephanie Maturo named Administrator Advocate of the Year

The Oswego County BOCES School Library System named Stephanie Maturo the 2014 Administrator Advocate of the Year in a ceremony held on May 13.

The 2014 Administrator Advocate of the Year Award was presented by the Oswego County BOCES School Library System, to Stephanie Maturo, Director of Technology in the Fulton City School District. From left are: Marla Yudin, Coordinator of the Oswego County BOCES School Library System; Sarah Fay, Volney Elementary School Library Media Specialist; Bill Lynch, Superintendent of the Fulton City Schools; Wendy Scalfaro, G. Ray Bodley High School Library Media Specialist; Stephanie Maturo; Barbara Senecal, Fairgrieve Elementary School Library Media Specialist; Betsy Connors, Executive Director of Curriculum and Assessment; and Teresa Burgdorf, Fulton Junior High School Library Media Specialist.

The 2014 Administrator Advocate of the Year Award was presented by the Oswego County BOCES School Library System, to Stephanie Maturo, Director of Technology in the Fulton City School District. From left are: Marla Yudin, Coordinator of the Oswego County BOCES School Library System; Sarah Fay, Volney Elementary School Library Media Specialist; Bill Lynch, Superintendent of the Fulton City Schools; Wendy Scalfaro, G. Ray Bodley High School Library Media Specialist; Stephanie Maturo; Barbara Senecal, Fairgrieve Elementary School Library Media Specialist; Betsy Connors, Executive Director of Curriculum and Assessment; and Teresa Burgdorf, Fulton Junior High School Library Media Specialist.

The award was created to honor a library advocate in an administrative position in an educational setting who has demonstrated innovative administrative initiatives in the area of school libraries and librarianship.

Maturo is the director of Technology in the Fulton City School District.

Marla Yudin, coordinator of the OCB School Library System said Maturo was selected by a committee comprised of current Oswego County SLS council members, liaisons and colleagues.

She was chosen for her forward thinking vision and support of the library media program.

Yudin said she was proud to name Maturo as the first recipient of the award for her support and collaboration with library initiatives and technologies.

Maturo was nominated by members of the Fulton district’s library team.

FCSD Superintendent Bill Lynch and Executive Director of Curriculum and Assessment Betsy Connors were on hand to congratulate Maturo on the award.

Hannibal teachers develop literacy intervention plan through grant funding

Thanks to a New York State Education Department grant, teachers at Hannibal High School have formulated a plan designed to provide additional support to students struggling with reading and writing.

The data-driven literacy intervention grant, issued earlier this year, funded the collaboration of six secondary-level teachers and their development of a Response To Intervention plan at Hannibal High School. After meeting multiple times over the course of two months, the six-person team comprised of Hannibal English teachers and other personnel were able to put their ideas on paper.

“Our charge was to create an RTI for the building to do literacy instruction and to create our dream,” said Courtney Best, who served as the grant facilitator. “It’s very rare for teachers to get together and create an RTI process for this age group. This is ground-breaking for the high school. It is a dream and we’re hoping it moves forward, that would be amazing.”

That dream, as outlined by the committee of six, is a multi-pronged approach targeting freshmen. It calls for a guided study hall, which would be overseen by a teaching assistant and would be specifically for students who are not completing homework or class assignments.

The plan also calls for a literacy lab where students would be required to read select book titles individually and aloud, identify unknown words and study vocabulary words.

According to Best, this proposal is a critical component in addressing literacy issues among high school students.

“It’s (very) important to have a plan that focuses on literacy,” she said. “Students need to have good literacy skills to be successful in any of their classes. All content areas are focusing on literacy and are receiving professional development in this area. The district sees that as a significant need.”

Although the plan has been drafted, Best noted that the vision is a long-term one.

“An RTI process is a fluid process where it starts as a seed; so this is just a seed we’re planting and it should develop over the next five or six years. I’m hoping we can revise it and refine it as we go along,” she said.

NY Sea Grant Offers Clean and Safe Boating Tips with 2014 ‘Water Mouse’ Exhibit

Oswego, NY – New York Sea Grant shares clean and safe boating tips as the new Discover Clean & Safe Boating educational vessel travels to venues throughout Upstate New York through the 2014 boating season.

NY Sea Grant Coastal Recreation and Tourism Specialist Dave White educates boaters about how to be safe, environmentally-friendly, and legal on NY waters.  He is seen here with the 2014 Discover Clean and Safe Boating educational vessel, a 10-foot 'water mouse.'

NY Sea Grant Coastal Recreation and Tourism Specialist Dave White educates boaters about how to be safe, environmentally-friendly, and legal on NY waters. He is seen here with the 2014 Discover Clean and Safe Boating educational vessel, a 10-foot ‘water mouse.’

The top ten list of tips from New York Sea Grant is designed to help boaters be safe, environmentally-friendly and legal on New York’s recreational waters:

1. Wear It! Make sure all passengers are wearing a US Coast-Guard approved life jacket. A throwable floatation device is also required for boats more than 16 feet long.

2. Conduct a Clean, Drain, Dry inspection of your watercraft, trailer and gear to remove aquatic invasive species and debris each time you enter and leave new water.

3. Check that the safety features of your boat trailer are in proper working order before use in the spring and throughout the boating season.

4. Depending upon your age, be sure you have the proper boating safety certification. New regulations took effect in New York State May 1, 2014.

5. Check expiration date/s of onboard fire extinguishers and flares. Be sure you have the correct number of extinguishers aboard per US Coast Guard regulations. Store flares and distress signals in dry compartment.

6. Use a fuel nozzle bib and bilge sock to keep fuel from spilling into the water.

7. Make sure all vessel lights are working and flashlights have fresh batteries.

8. Have a proper device onboard to receive weather alerts.

9. Check to be sure you have the proper navigational charts onboard.

10. Check that the boat horn, whistles, and other means of sounding distress are in working order.

Since its inception in 2008, the Discover Clean & Safe Boating campaign, a program developed by New York Sea Grant in partnership with the Boating Industries Association of Upstate New York with support from marine industry representatives, has educated more than half-a-million boaters about how to be legal, safe and environmentally-friendly on New York state waters.

The annual campaign features a different type of vessel provided by New York state manufacturers and dealers each year. The traveling exhibit equips the boats with all the required and recommended equipment for clean, safe and lawful boating on New York waters.

The 2014 Discover Clean & Safe Boating educational vessel is a two-seat ‘water mouse’ just 10 feet long.

‘I love that my little boat is traveling on a public service mission with New York Sea Grant,’ says Patti White of Pirate’s Cove Marina and Resort on the Oneida River in Clay, NY, who has donated the use of the boat. ‘We need to encourage every boater to be safety conscious in any size boat.’

The Discover Clean & Safe Boating campaign has steadily expanded its educational outreach to include anglers, duck hunters, pontoon boat and paddle sports enthusiasts, deaf boaters, and, in 2014, New York’s First Responders who handle water-related emergencies.

The Discover Clean & Safe Boating campaign also shares the North American Safe Boating Campaign Wear It! message.

‘A major component of the Discover Clean & Safe Boating message is encouraging people to learn which type of life jacket is right for them and to wear it,’ says New York Sea Grant Coastal Recreation and Tourism Specialist Dave White.

The campaign also emphasizes the national Stop Aquatic Hitchhikers Clean-Drain-Dry message for removing aquatic debris that may contain invasive species.

‘Clean, Drain, Dry refers to easy-to-implement steps boaters can take whenever they launch their boats to help reduce the spread of invasive species that can impact boating venues and the coastal economies that thrive on marine-related activities,’ White says.

A 12-foot made-in-New York canoe from Marathon Boat Group of Marathon, NY, was added as a permanent educational vessel with the campaign in 2012.

The Discover Clean & Safe Boating campaign has been recognized as a model marine industry partnership program at four international marine industry conferences. Dave White has received a BoatUS Foundation Environmental Leadership Commendation and a US Coast Guard Auxiliary Wear It! Award for developing and implementing the campaign. For more information, contact New York Sea Grant at 315-312-3042, www.nyseagrant.org.

NYS Police K9 Teams Visit Public Safety and Justice Classes

Students enrolled in the Public Safety and Justice Program at Oswego County BOCES met two very special four-legged members of the New York State Police K9 Unit and learned that the phrase, “man’s best friend” is no cliché.

Trooper Kevin Conners and his K9 partner Lynde talk to students enrolled in the Public Safety and Justice program at Oswego County BOCES about their role as a trained scent-specific trailing team.

Trooper Kevin Conners and his K9 partner Lynde talk to students enrolled in the Public Safety and Justice program at Oswego County BOCES about their role as a trained scent-specific trailing team.

Mark Bender, the students’ instructor and a full-time New York State Trooper brought his canine partner, Mandin in to the class and was joined by fellow Trooper Kevin Conners, who brought his canine partner, Lynde.

Mandin, a Czech shepherd is a patrol dog trained to search for narcotics and trained in handler protection, criminal tracking and apprehension. Lynde is part of the New York State Police Bloodhound Team and is a trained scent-specific trailing dog.

Troopers Bender and Conners talked to students about the training program that they completed with their respective K9 partners and how their K9 partner assists them in various on-the-job situations.

Trained to search for narcotics, K9 Mandin signals to his partner, Trooper Mark Bender, that he has found such a substance in the filing cabinet. The demonstration was coordinated for students in the Public Safety and Justice program, giving them an opportunity to learn about the NYS Police K9 Unit.

Trained to search for narcotics, K9 Mandin signals to his partner, Trooper Mark Bender, that he has found such a substance in the filing cabinet. The demonstration was coordinated for students in the Public Safety and Justice program, giving them an opportunity to learn about the NYS Police K9 Unit.

The two troopers and their partners staged a few typical scenarios, giving students an opportunity to see how K9s assisted in trailing and apprehending a criminal.

Instructors for the Public Safety and Justice Program are highly-trained professionals currently working in the field, allowing the program to stay current and better prepare its students for today’s workforce.

Trooper Bender is in his 12th year at OCB and his 20th year with the New York State Police.

Trooper Mark Bender signals his K9 partner Mandin to stay while he prepares to pat down or search a potential suspect, played by Oswego County BOCES Public Safety and Justice Instructor Charles Gabriel. Gabriel played the role of a violent criminal during the demonstration, pushing Trooper Bender to the ground to give Public Safety and Justice students an opportunity to see how a police K9 is trained to protect his/her handler in the field.

Trooper Mark Bender signals his K9 partner Mandin to stay while he prepares to pat down or search a potential suspect, played by Oswego County BOCES Public Safety and Justice Instructor Charles Gabriel. Gabriel played the role of a violent criminal during the demonstration, pushing Trooper Bender to the ground to give Public Safety and Justice students an opportunity to see how a police K9 is trained to protect his/her handler in the field.

NLRB Finds Novelis Broke Labor Laws at Oswego Plant

OSWEGO, NY – The National Labor Relations Board charged aluminum producer Novelis with violating labor laws in its response to workers’ efforts to organize a union at its Oswego facility.

Novelis, which also has other unfair labor practice charges pending before the NLRB related to its interference in the effort to unionize its 600 hourly workers, is charged with illegally threatening job loss, plant closure, wage reductions and with providing benefits to employees in order to dissuade them from voting to join the USW.

In addition, the company is accused of manipulating documents to make it appear that the union was behind a plan to rescind those benefits.

USW District 4 Director John Shinn said Novelis has engaged in clear-cut, illegal, union-busting behavior.

“It’s unfortunate that it has come to this, but this company has proven that it will stop at nothing to keep workers from gaining a voice on the job,” Shinn said. “The workers and their families deserve better than this, and the best way for them to improve the situation is through collective action.”

“The USW would never deprive hard-working people of the benefits they deserve,” Shinn said. “We believe the actions we’ve taken are the best way to achieve the goal of a better workplace and better community for all.”

USW attorney Brad Manzolillo said that, due to the particularly outrageous behavior of Novelis management, the NLRB may ultimately compel Novelis to recognize the USW as the bargaining representative of Novelis-Oswego employees without holding a new election.

“The NLRB only seeks these orders when an employer’s illegal conduct is so egregious and extreme that it makes it impossible to have a fair election,” Manzolillo said. “Despite the claims Novelis has made to the contrary, this is far from a ‘typical’ case. Novelis has committed extremely serious violations, and the board is seeking the strongest remedies available to it under the law.”

The USW also represents workers at Novelis plants in Indiana, West Virginia and Ontario. The Oswego workers sought to unionize after the company imposed unilateral benefit cuts. The union fell just 14 votes short in a February election despite unprecedented interference by Novelis.

The USW is the largest industrial union in North America, representing workers in a range of industries including metals, mining, rubber, paper and forestry, oil refining, health care, security, hotels, and municipal governments and agencies.

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Fulton Rotarians Help Out Salvation Army

The Fulton Noon Rotarians were made aware in late winter that the two community food pantries, one at the Salvation Army and one at Catholic Charities, were in need of more food supplies than were being donated. The Rotarians took action and each Rotarian donated funds each week to the two organizations to help them buy food.

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The British Are Coming To Harborfest!

Come to Oswego’s historic harbor to witness a re-enactment of the Battle of Oswego during the 27th annual Harborfest. The action begins at 2 p.m. on Saturday. “We will have a few ships and a gunboat in the harbor, including Oswego’s own OMF Ontario, engaging with Fort Ontario to re-create this event,” said Steve Fulton, director of Oswego’s Harborfest. “There will be action from the east breakwall to the west bluff, so people can line up anywhere along to harbor to watch the battle.”

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Midway Drive-In Seeks Help Of Community To Rebuild

While we have been questioning the future of the drive-in there has been a seemingly endless stream of automobiles pulling over to the side of the road or pulling into the driveway with folks getting out of their cars to stand quietly and to gaze upon the mangled screen tower, as though at a wake paying their final respects; many capturing photos for remembrance. There has been an amazing outpouring from the community through personal emails, visits at the theatre and through social media.

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Long-Time District Clerk Announces Retirement

After more than 20 years on the job, William Foley will step down next month from his position as clerk for the Oswego City School District. Foley, who also acts as the district’s public information officer, said he applied for the position because the ad said they were looking for someone to help promote the school district – something the OHS grad felt he could do well.

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Mayor Gillen Announces Appointment of Zoning and Planning Director

Oswego Mayor Tom Gillen is pleased to announce the appointment of Amy L. Birdsall as the Zoning and Planning Director for the city of Oswego. She will lead the Zoning and Planning Department. Her responsibilities will include overseeing city land use policies, zoning administration, and planning and development efforts.

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